The Real Ellsworth Toohey: Anthony Lane Reviews ‘Dark Knight Rises’

I am very happy that the movie Dark Knight Rises stayed on top of the box office rankings for three weeks in a row in spite of the terrible shooting at Aurora, Colorado. To date the worldwide sales for Dark Knight Rises is at $750 million and continuing to grow. After three weeks of running at the top it beat the opening of the Total Recall remake by more than $10 million dollars. Dark Knight Rises made $36,440 million in domestic sales during a weekend of heavy competition at a run time of 2 hours and 45 minutes, which defies logic in Hollywood terms. Dark Knight Rises is only $40 million dollars behind the domestic total of The Dark Knight–the previous Batman film in the Nolan trilogy–at its 17 day total mark, which is quite incredible considering the blanket of horror that shrouded a very good film on the opening weekend tragedy.

But Why?

The why is the reason I sat in the Regal Theater long after the movie credits ended and only silence in an empty arena looked back at me with a blank screen white and motionless. I know damn well why Dark Knight Rises is so successful and there are factions on the progressive political side that fears that reason, because they know it too and work to prevent it. The movie is fantastic not because it has any particular realism to the story line. Some might find parts of it unbelievable as the heroics might sometimes defy logic. But Dark Knight Rises is not about realism, it’s about what lives in the human heart and why. It is about what works in society and what doesn’t, and it holds up the confusing messages of our current world and takes viewers on an incredible journey into topics that baffle us in the light of day. Read my review by CLICKING HERE.

I will have to give Christopher Nolan credit; he played the ultimate Don Diego. Only people who know me well will understand what I mean by that, but Nolan pulled off a miracle that critics should have seen coming in the previous two films. I suspected it was coming, but I had no idea that he would be able to pull it off with a 2 hour and 45 minute movie without Warner Brothers cutting the film down to an even 2 hours, because the extra 45 minutes contain all the important messages that progressives have managed to suppress for many years of film making. Dark Knight Rises is the movie that Ayn Rand would have put her support behind, along with Walt Disney, and John Wayne. CLICK HERE TO SEE WHY. Nolan working within the framework of a progressive town wore the mask himself and did the impossible delivering to the world a film they needed to see.

And the world is HUNGRY for it. Once critics saw the film and realized the heavy anti-collectivist message Dark Knight Rises contained they tried to back out of their gushy support for Christopher Nolan, which up to a few weeks ago could do no wrong. But it was too late.

You see, the battle for the heart of mankind is at stake, and progressives want to posses that heart. They want control of the media in virtually every way and they do not want competition in thought, because their ideas cannot compete directly with a philosophy of freedom. If you are familiar with the great novel The Fountainhead there are a million Ellsworth Toohey’s working today as newspaper reporters, newscasters, and film critics. Dark Knight Rises directed by the critically acclaimed Christopher Nolan turned out to be a work of Howard Roark and the critics didn’t catch it till after the film hit theaters and a gush of anxiety rippled through progressive communities like an earthquake.

To see an example of what I’m talking about here are a couple of reviews from Anthony Lane of The New Yorker. The New Yorker is a progressive publication in the extreme. They were progressive well before there was ever a Huffington Post, a Daily Show, and Bill Maher. They were progressive when George Soros was still making his fortune as a capitalist on Wall Street. I have read The New Yorker for years as a way to hone my writing skills, because they often publish very good short stories and I enjoy their articles. They’d never publish anything I’d write because my politics is way too conservative for them, but I do appreciate good literature even if it’s progressive. But it cannot be ignored that they are attempting to paint Dark Knight Rises as unsophisticated tripe that should be ignored by popular culture. Below are two links from The New Yorker so you can see for yourself what is being said by them and how. Read these reviews intently. The gap between what the general public wants and what the progressive desires for mankind is absolutely clear by looking at the words of the reviewers who have come out against Dark Knight Rises.

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/cinema/2012/07/30/120730crci_cinema_lane/
http://www.newyorker.com/arts/reviews/film/the_dark_knight_rises_nolan

It is in such pretentiousness that many Victorian well wishers hold much sway. For the leeching progressive who desires human weakness, ever-growing government, and perpetual debt they fully endorse films and other art that supports their cause. They do not want characters like Batman to inspire an entire generation of young people toward the cause of inner strength and valor. Valor to the progressive is the Holy Water of political exorcism. Hollywood fears these types of progressive critics because they are perceived to be the intellectual elite and don’t want the intellectual elite to alienate Hollywood from cocktail conversation.

But it’s OK Hollywood to turn the progressive opinion loose. The numbers from Dark Knight Rises should solve the question once and for all. Dark Knight Rises will make well over a billion dollars for Hollywood, much, much more than Slumdog Millionaire. Making the kind of movies that make people like Anthony Lane happy will not make Hollywood money. But making movies like Dark Knight Rises will. And it takes more than dressing up a guy in a bat suit to pull it off. The movie has to have the correct message that audiences respond to, and Dark Knight Rises has it, and they put it up on the screen without apology.

To understand the intention of The New Yorker’s Anthony Lane all one needs to do is read Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead. Ellsworth Toohey is a character in the microcosm of that classic novel that many of today’s critics and newspaper journalists play similar roles. In media circles, the New Yorker is considered to be the top rung of social thought, and out of all the journalists who wish to become great novelists, or work for a big news organization, they read the opinions of The New Yorker, where writers like Anthony Lane help shape the parameters of society in the exact same say that Ellsworth Toohey did against Howard Roark in The Fountainhead, written in 1943. So the tricks are not new, but if left unchecked will play out perpetually forever and to great destructive effect.

In The Fountainhead, Toohey was furious that Howard Roark was able to build the type of architectural designs that authenticated Roark’s individual existence. So Toohey used his influence at the newspaper he worked at to shape social thought away from Roark’s designs even though the public enjoyed the originality, and strength of them. Toohey being the gatekeeper of what was “cool” in society or “uncool” attempted with all his effort to bring Roark to his knees in complete destruction for the sole reason that Roark functioned outside of the influence of Toohey. For an example, below is a short line from Toohey from The Fountainhead. Then compare what Anthony Lane says about Dark Knight Rises in the linked New Yorker movie reviews above with the Toohey quote in mind. If you know the Rand work, you will understand immediately. If you are still being exposed to this work, then it might take a moment of thought to behold.

• Don’t set out to raze all shrines—you’ll frighten men. Enshrine mediocrity—and the shrines are razed.
o Ellsworth Toohey, p. 636 of The Fountainhead

Now, The New Yorker quote from the July 30th 2012 film review.

• Be honest. How badly would you not want Bruce—or Batman—to show up at one of your parties? He has no small talk (and Bale, as an actor, has charisma but no charm), although ask him about fear, anger, and other large abstract nouns, especially as they relate to him, and he’ll keep you in the corner all night. He doesn’t eat or drink, besides toying with a flute of champagne. Basic human tasks are beyond his reach; direct Batman to the bathroom, and it would take him twenty minuets of hydraulic shunting simply to unzip. On the rare occasions when Bruce, fresh from his helicopter or his Lamborghini, enters a reception with a girl or two on his arm, he looks deeply uncomfortable, and Nolan, as if sharing that unease, tends to hurry him through the moment. The point—and, after three installments, it seems a fatal one—is that the two halves of our hero form not a beguiling contrast but a dreary, perfect match. Both as Wayne and as super-Wayne he seems indifferent, as the films themselves are, to the activities of little people and to the claims of the everyday, preferring to semi-purse his lips, as if preparing to whistle for an errant dog, and stare pensively into the distance. Caped or uncaped, the guy is a bore. He should have kids; that would pull him out of himself. Or else he should hang out with Iron Man and get wasted. He should have fun.
o Anthony Lane from The “esteemed” New Yorker.

If you understand the media network and how it works from the top where Anthony Lane writes from to the bottom, where the local 22-year-old journalism major is trying hard to impress editors at large publications so they can advance their careers by mimicking the type behavior exhibited in The New Yorker, you can begin to understand why I did not want to leave the theater at the end of Dark Knight Rises, because the way the system is set up, such movies hardly ever get made to the epic scale shown in the latest Batman film.

Yes, there is a war for the heart of man, and too many writers trained in colleges and film schools have been taught to bend their will to the Anthony Lanes of the world. The writing pool in Hollywood has been watered down with progressive tripe, in spite of the hunger for American audiences to witness the exceptional. So Hollywood has turned to comic books, not destroyed by progressivism for new material to put on the big screen, because comic books have not been destroyed by the Ellsworth Toohey’s of literature. The American public wants exceptionalism. Children want more than mediocrity, and much of their anger as young people approaching adulthood is the realization that the world they live in is mediocre, shaped in large by people like Anthony Lane. Because when an example of exceptionalism shows itself, progressives attempt to crush them before they have a chance to encourage others to also rise above mediocrity.

I appreciate exactly how difficult it was to bring a movie like Dark Knight Rises to the big screen, and it is now obvious that like Nolan’s film Inception, the concept of delivering Dark Knight Rises was a dream within a dream within a dream. The motive was well-kept and hidden from people like Anthony Lane behind the performance of Heath Ledger in The Dark Knight to set up this well conceived comic book masterpiece that arrived intact to millions of fans in a unique exposé of valor, honor, and inner strength exemplifying the plight of the individual against a parasitic attack by collectivists.

In this case, fans are voting with their wallets. But the progressive wishes for the vote to never take place, which is why more films like Dark Knight Rises does not see the light of day off a film executives desk. The process for which such restrictions occur were written by the former screen writer Ayn Rand in her masterpiece The Fountainhead. For me, to see Dark Knight Rises was equivalent to reading about Howard Roark’s construction of the Wayland Building. The journey is very similar and to see it happen is an act of wonder that I won’t soon forget.

Toohey in the novel The Fountainhead embraced socialism as a political philosophy because he was a weakling in his youth. He knew he could never be exceptional, so as he grew into an adult he used his natural manipulative abilities to bring down the world around him with aspirations of collectivism in an attempt to eliminate his own anxiety about a world that would always outpace him—as he would always be condemned to a life of mediocrity. Without knowing Anthony Lane personally, his views of the world are without doubt very close to the fictional views of Ellsworth Toohey and for the same reasons. They fear that stories like Dark Knight Rises might push society to reach for exceptionalism and are a direct threat to their meager, boring lives.

However, as the evidence at Comic Con testifies to, most people do aspire to become more than mediocre. The fan geeks and other Comic Con nerds are at least in their minds attempting to behold the heroics of exceptionalism even if their bodies cannot rise to meet the cause. It is in the act of embracing the idea of a superhero where magic actually happens, and this is to the peril of collectivism. No child at 5 years old yearns to the toy aisle at Target to search for the newest toy that will allow them to pretend they are at a New York dinner party impressing people like the snooty Anthony Lane. Instead kids look for fast cars in their Hot Wheels, action figures from The Dark Knight, and Star Wars light sabers because in such play is the attempt to be more than social yielding wants for us. Hidden deep in the mind of Anthony Lane is a concession that fantasy should be abandoned in favor of realism which falls under the spell of political control where magazines like The New Yorker set the standard of quality. But the box office results do not lie. Nobody waits in line to read The New Yorker and nobody would scammer to the theater 3 to 4 times to see the same movie like they are doing with Dark Knight Rises, if the movie was about collectivism. It is exceptionalism that audiences want and in the case of Dark Knight Rises, Director Christopher Nolan found a way to work around the system to give everybody but the progressive what they wanted. Warner Brothers get a smash hit that will help carry their studio through the rest of the year without worry. And the fans received a film that will fill their imaginations with a yearning for greatness, even if the closest they ever get is in a darkened movie theater.

The truth is in the box office take, because in spite of the progressives who wish to shape society with gentle nudges, the fans have put their money where their mouth is. This is devastating news to all the Ellsworth Toohey’s who are quite stunned at the box office take in spite of all their efforts. So it brings me great pleasure to see Dark Knight Rises continuing its path to a billion dollars. Because film studios must take note of what not just American audiences want, but the entire world. The world wants Batman, and they want their heroes uncorrupted, unafraid, and larger than life. And these days, the modern heroes’ ride the musical wave of Hans Zimmer as it is his music that most plays from my iPod hour by hour week by week on a quest for valor and hope of what can come from fearlessness.

Behold—the superman! What every young person should strive to emulate without apology!

To place in perspective just how important those box office numbers are for Dark Knight Rises consider that popular summer film geared exclusively toward older women, Magic Mike featuring male strippers was released on June 29th and to date has only made $110,894 million total, and has not been released to international markets. Magic Mike would be considered a progressive film as it plays to the feminist movement. The movie did very well the first couple of weekends as all the “liberated” women flocked to the theaters to see a movie that gave them revenge on men for all the “sexist” films they’ve watched over the years like American Pie and the Hangover. Opening that same weekend was Ted directed by the makers of the cartoon Family Guy which to date has made $203,414 million with a production budget of only $50 million, both movies could be considered a financial success, but not even in the same category as a film like Dark Knight Rises.

In the same arena however would be the latest Spiderman which is not considered a success and insiders are disappointed. Opening right before the 4th of July it had the benefit of a holiday week with a rare Tuesday midnight opening, then a following weekend to make a ton of money, but for the month of July it only made $250,640 with a production budget of $230 million, not exactly a runaway success. The only film that looks to beat Dark Knight Rises in the year of 2012 is The Avengers which opened in early May and to date has a worldwide box office take of $1.6 billion dollars after three months of release. Dark Knight Rises is already halfway at that point, and it still hasn’t opened in China or Italy. But what those last mentioned films have in common as opposed to the more progressive films like Ted and Magic Mike is that they are superhero movies—movies about individuals doing big and glorious things. Critics like those who write for The New Yorker and other so-called prominent publications seem to dislike money, so to them all the movies are on equal footing. But in a world where fans of movies vote with the price of a ticket, the differences are extremely clear. In the end, the ones left standing in the corner talking to themselves won’t be Batman at the dinner party but the pretentious socialite that wants to talk about feelings and how to save the poor which global socialism created. Everyone else will be at the movies watching Batman kick the crap out of the kind of people who write for The New Yorker.

____________________________________________

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2 thoughts on “The Real Ellsworth Toohey: Anthony Lane Reviews ‘Dark Knight Rises’

  1. Anthony Lane totally missed the point about many things in The Dark Knight Rises. One that stands out to me is revealed when he wrote “On the rare occasions when Bruce, fresh from his helicopter or his Lamborghini, enters a reception with a girl or two on his arm, he looks deeply uncomfortable, and Nolan, as if sharing that unease, tends to hurry him through the moment.” The whole point is that Bruce Wayne is NOT a conceited playboy. He is very much in love with Rachel Dawes. He wears the billionaire playboy persona as a mask to divert suspicion away from his heroics and selflessness as Batman. He would much rather be on a quiet date with Rachel than clubbing with two supermodels. He IS uncomfortable with the two girls on his arm.

    As you said, his review reveals a lot about the mentality of elite progressives…and a Russian immigrant named Ayn Rand described exactly how liberals like Anthony Lane would react to something like The Dark Knight…way back in 1943!

    As for that masterpiece, “The Fountainhead”…my favorite quote by far is this one, which reveals a lot about the Howard Roark character:

    Toohey: I’m fighting you and shall fight you in every way I can!
    Roark: You’re free to do what you please.
    Toohey: Mr. Roark, we’re alone here. Why don’t you tell me what you think of me in any words you wish?
    Roark: But I don’t think of you.

    Like

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