Month: February 2017

Donald Trump and Saint Augustine: Becoming a missionary of justice to fight off the pagan insurgents

It was intensely bizarre for me personally to be standing at the grave of St. Augustine in his demolished Abby while watching the media reaction to Donald Trump’s CPAC speech on my iPhone because in a lot of ways, what Trump and Steve Bannon are doing presently reflects accurately what St. Augustine did in 597 AD under the assignment of Pope Gregory. Rome had to withdraw its troops from Britain to protect its crumbling empire and Anglo Saxons had moved into south England bringing with them their pagan religions to corrupt the countryside away from Christianity, which had been brought to England by the Romans.  Augustine set up a mission in Canterbury and formed a friendship with the pagan king Æthelberht of Kent and within a few years the Roman Catholic Church was converting pagans to Christianity serving as the first of its kind anywhere in the world. What happened in Canterbury would be done to the far corners of the world in favor of the Catholic Church following the manner for which Augustine had conducted the enterprise.  Eventually during the reformation in England King Henry VIII would destroy the Abby and loot it of its wealth which left the place in ruins at Canterbury.  But the body of St. Augustine remained for me to observe as I finished watching the speech fall out by Donald Trump who was given a similar task, this time not by a Pope, but by the people of the United States to spread the message of Americanism to a world hell-bent on anti-capitalist objectives.

Trump’s message to the media during CPAC was firm, that they were no longer relevant and that the White House would not be moved off its objective of returning Americanism to the land of the free as opposed to the pagan chaos of the parasites that had moved in and taken refuge in the shadows of the weak leaders that have emerged over the last century due to a more global focus on philosophy and economics. Stunningly the whole speech was carried live in England from the start of it to the end and endless commentary spewed forth after.  Donald Trump like St. Augustine before him was a vessel for undoing the damage caused by poor thinking and the lack of structure adhered to by an advanced culture.  For instance, the moment the Romans moved out of England, the society reverted back to the tribalism of the Germanic people following perfectly the Vico cycle—where democracy turns to anarchy, then back to theology—and thus under St Augustine, then by the influence of the Nomads, the spreading of Christianity spread again and gave birth to a new age which lasted for over a thousand years.

Trump is engaged in the same kind of effort. The emphasis of his presidency is one with a long goal in mind, to change the culture of America back toward patriotism and to vanquish those who speak against it, which has been the entire world.  And the world cannot turn away because Trump is such a great topic to cover, they can’t help but put him on television.  Even as Jodi Foster held a rally against Trump and the attendees of the Oscars were winding up for a celebration of the black, gay film Moonlight—Trump was planning his own celebrations which would divide up the media coverage of what is often a monopoly held by Hollywood on Oscar night.  For the first time ever a sitting president wasn’t licking the heels of the Hollywood community, but was standing in defiance of them during Oscar night.  Even as Hollywood and their Academy members bent over backwards to put a film like Moonlight into the limelight—to show they aren’t racist elites in Santa Monica, Trump was beating a different drum and the world was listening—a national patriotism that was intent to convert people back to what built the country.

img_3820Our politicians in America and the media culture that followed it were a lot like the Germanic people who invaded England once the Roman Empire withdrew. That is always what happens when a powerful force from a superior culture takes away its influence.  The masses collapse on themselves and chaos ushers itself in.  This was the subject of the great Ayn Rand novel Atlas Shrugged, where the producers of society withdrew their talents and society quickly crumbled away.  What has been told to American culture was that we should embrace all these “Moonlight” values and establish our society on those foundations, which of course lead to a degradation of the human condition—as we see presently in Paris.  Even as all this news was spewing forth about the Oscars and Trump’s CPAC speech across Europe, President Hollande was complaining about how disrespectful Trump had been toward the city of Paris—and the news cycle did almost nothing but talk about it.

In the past lesser people would feel the burden of not being accepted by the actors of Hollywood, or the press, or even global socialists like Hollande, but Trump doesn’t care, because he is on a mission and his drive is not created from other people, it is generated from within. And that’s what the world doesn’t understand.  I could see it clearly watching the news while I toured the St. Augustine Abby and paid respect to the tomb of the Saint himself.  Trump was that modern voice who had to step into a pagan land of lawless behemoths and establish order among them.  Trump gets all his strength from within himself, in his faith in his ability.  Augustine put his faith in God so he was able to step into a hostile environment and establish the first Church of England.  Trump is doing something as we speak that will be talked about for thousands of years and that history is happening in the present—and it’s quite something to see.

It is during events like this which is why I love history so much, because understanding these types of things explain contemporary occurrences with context. Because once you understand the Vico cycle and the patterns of the human race, you can know the outcome of something that is happening which of course happened before.  Only instead of the topic being Christianity as it was in Augustine’s time, it is now the concept of Americanism, which to my eyes the world desperately needs.  The pagan losers in Hollywood like Jodi Foster, Casey Affleck and many others never understood the meaning of America, and are completely unable to define it.  And the kids in the media, all those entertainment writers and beat reporters who are under 30 years old and have a lifetime of lessons to learn before really being able to inform a public of a viewpoint beyond the facts of a matter—they are lost and rootless and will quickly convert to the Americanism that Trump and Steve Bannon are proposing.  Just as the skeptical Æthelberht listened to Augustine for his first years of missionary action then converted to Christianity from his pagan roots—the world too will do the same with Trump.  And Trump knows it.

The real fear that isn’t being said at the Oscars, in France, in the media and in the CNN newsrooms, the New York Times boardroom, and all the others who are finding themselves on the outside of Trump’s White House. They are aware of it too, that they are about to be extinct.  Trump is converting pagans to Americanism and his White House has more global influence than all of Hollywood and the modern press put together and it is driving them crazy to realize how irrelevant they are.   And that was the purpose of the old cathedrals, they were to impress upon the residents the power and majestic triumph of the Catholic Church which strengthened their faith into God and the Church’s role in statehood.  Trump is now doing that with the White House, using that majestic platform to spread the benefits of Americanism.  And the pagans know they are losing their grip on the American public because Trump doesn’t need anything from them leaving them completely powerless.   And that is a great thing!

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

cropped-img_0202.jpg

Socialism is Destroying The Louvre: Capitalism is the best way to preserve art and history

For a museum that opened in 1793 and had been used as a personal residence of King Francis I and many others after him serving around 10 million visitors a year and is one of the most celebrated of its kind in the world, I had high expectations for The Louvre in Paris. I love museums, I absolutely adore the one in Cincinnati which I visit several times a year called The Museum Center.  However, I have always assumed that places like The Louvre were far superior—after all, when one thinks of Paris they think of two things, the Eiffel Tower and The Louvre so my pilgrimage to that historic museum was something I had thought about for decades.  Perhaps it was because I had been spoiled by the various Heritage sites across the English Channel in England.  My wife and I are members of English Heritage which gives us free access to important historic sites all over England from Stonehenge to Dover Castle and everything in between.  Even relatively small sites like St. Augustine’s Abbey in Canterbury have wonderful museums that go along with their preservation sites.  I had spent a week leading up to my visit to The Louvre visiting Heritage sites and spending a lot of time at the British Museum in London—and I have to say, I was in heaven.  They were so wonderfully organized and put together and the literature they offered was immense and provided me with years of reading.

Yet when I arrived at The Louvre I was greeted with chaos and socialist mayhem. Let me begin by saying that if The Louvre had been in the United States, it would be the greatest attraction in the world, including Disney World.  The building itself was immaculate, stunning even.  And the museum collection acquired under Napoleon rivaled anything else in the world.  It was remarkable.  The combination of contemporary design with the ancient was everything I hoped it would be.  But the main problem with The Louvre was that it is being operated by socialists who have no idea what they are doing.  They have this wonderful museum with all these people coming to it—but they literally have screwed up every aspect of the enterprise starting at the front gate.

My family arrived surprised to see an hour-long line outside the pyramid. We naturally assumed that this was the line to purchase tickets. So we stood in the cold needing to use the restroom for just a little over an hour only to find out that the line we were in was just for security.  The Louvre had enough visitors on a Wednesday afternoon at lunch time to populate a football stadium in the United States, yet the security forced everyone to go through two lines of airport like security which took forever.  Everyone understands that The Louvre is a target for terrorist attacks, but they should have at least had 7 to 8 security lines to properly handle all the museum visitors.  By the time we all got through security we all had to use the restroom—badly.  One of the worst things in France is that they don’t know how to give people places to use the restroom.  They have these ridiculous public restrooms on the sidewalks that hardly work.  Every time I tried to use one it malfunctioned and the seat would come up and the door would come up to the outside letting everyone in the world see you.  So we didn’t use those.  I thought we were in luck by the major tourist attraction of Notre Dame.  We followed the signs to the “toilets” only to go down a series of steps to find a group of east Europeans sitting in a group behind a steel cage charging 1 Euro to go through turnstile just to use the restroom.  So guess what, we turned around and decided to wait until we got to The Louvre thinking it would be like the Museum Center in Cincinnati—and would have like rows of places to use the restroom.  By the time we arrived in that hour long line, we had to go badly and it was almost unbearable by the time we got through security.  There certainly wasn’t any place to go in the courtyard around the pyramid.  Now that we were through security we rushed to the restrooms before buying tickets and found a line there too—especially for the women.

I told my family that I’d step into the men’s room, use the restroom, then I’d get our tickets. By the time I got through that line I thought the girls would have a chance to get through that massive women’s line.  Now keep in mind that this was a Wednesday afternoon in February.  It wasn’t Saturday in the middle of the summer.  For a museum of this size, there was no way there should be lines like what we saw at The Louvre.  Going into the restroom it was pandemonium, and there were as many women in there as men.  It was sheer chaos.  And there were only four urinals.  I managed to use one and did as I said and went to stand in another line to get admission tickets.  After standing in lines for over two hours we had our tickets and were ready to see the museum.  My wife and daughter gave up on the women’s restroom not moving at all for over twenty minutes and used the men’s room under the guidance of my son-in-law.  That solved one problem, now we had another one, we needed to eat.

The plan was always to eat at The Louvre so we didn’t stop at any of the many little restaurants on our way. We figured we grab a bite to eat, spend about 10 minutes eating it, then we’d get into the museum and get to work.  But no, they had only like three restaurants and all of them had half hour lines.  My wife and I managed to get some food as my daughter and her husband waited for an additional 15 minutes to get the same type of food.  The food itself was pretty good, but the means to get it was horrendous.  The employees were slow and unmotivated.  They didn’t care how big the crowds were, they weren’t getting into any kind of hurry.  Service in France is just unfathomably terrible.  Nobody cares about anything and everyone just exists.  And at The Louvre, customer service was not a priority.

Once we got through all that we enjoyed the museum, but the way the experience started put a bad taste in our mouth. If The Louvre had been in America there would have been about 10 restaurants all around the grand room and plenty of seating and bathrooms. Getting tickets for a museum, using the restroom and obtaining food should be easy things for such a large tourist attraction so that visitors could spend their time learning and doing things.  But under the socialist country of France, they even managed to screw up a slam dunk of a great tourist attraction, and turn it into sheer misery.

The whole thing told the story of why socialism is so terrible and how capitalism services society so much better.  Even in England they get it, the Heritage people understand how they make their money to offer services to a public which funds the preservation of art and history.  But The Louvre, they are missing millions of dollars of opportunities and are just living off their reputation—which won’t last forever.  They need approximately ten times the bathroom capacity and that much equally in restaurant availability.  They certainly have the room for it, but obviously not the business sense.  If I were running The Louvre I’d seek out a partnership with McDonald’s—someone who knows how to serve massive amounts of customers quickly.  I’d also bring in other American fast-food chains who are just as good—obviously, the French don’t know how to do that on their own and I’d set them all up on some of those blank walls in the main area under the pyramid outside of the ticketing area.

It isn’t cool to provide bad service, and it certainly doesn’t place people above the bourgeoisie of society to drag ass everything.   Bad service is just disrespectful and it says to visitors of The Louvre that the management doesn’t give a rat’s ass if anyone visits or not.  And from what I saw, The Louvre really doesn’t care if anyone comes.  They think they are entitled to the business and they think that because there really isn’t much else to do in Paris except visit museums that they’ll get by with this kind of thing for the foreseeable future.  But I’m sure I’m not the only visitor to The Louvre to come away feeling disenchanted by their terrible service.   They have a lot of lessons to learn, and for their own sake, they better start learning them.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

cropped-img_0202.jpg

Paris is a Disaster: Stepping beyond progressivism and the metaphor of Sainte Chapelle

I’ve listened to people rattle on about how wonderful Paris is, the “great city of lights” for years now, and I really thought I was missing something. Not allowing for a lack of being there to shape my opinions I felt I needed to give the place a chance to win me over even though I knew going in that France was a socialist country and that I’d likely be disappointed.  My family is of the type that we can make something good out of anything, so a little video of our trip can be seen below as we hit the major tourist sites, Notre Dame, Sainte Chapelle, the Louvre, the bridge of locks, and the Eiffel Tower and everything in between as we walked the entire length from the Eurostar train station all the way down to the tower.  We didn’t do the tourist thing of riding in a taxi or a bus to get through the “quaint” neighborhoods with all their “great” personality to arrive at our destinations.  We came to know the city through hard work—and boy did we get to see it up close.  We did hire a bicycle cart to take us from the Eiffel Tower back up to Notre Dame because my wife had developed a massive blister on her foot and we wanted to get her back up to the Boulevard de Strasbourg for the heaviest part of the walk so not to risk being late for our train at the Gare du Nord.  Given that little explanation, this is what our trip looked like getting to and leaving Paris.

But let me say this—Paris is a disaster. A city living off its past that has been destroyed by the chaos of kingdoms, religion, and now open border socialism.  What I saw along just the Boulevard de Strasbourg was enough to convince me to shut down the city and start over, because they have a mess.  It was more of a third world country than one of the premier capitals of the world—and their undisciplined immigration and loose lifestyles have eradicated the city of any nobility of character.  The first sign of trouble came just a block from the train station where two men were arguing, one of them looked homeless.  He had a large concrete block over his head threatening to throw it through a window while the other man cussed at him in French with great passion to put it down.  We had to walk between them to get down the sidewalk and apparently, this goes on all the time because the other people with us on the crowded sidewalk were just going about their business.  If that guy were doing something like that in the United States, somebody would have shot him, it’s that simple.  The whole ordeal was just a hot mess representation of what a country with open borders and progressive socialism produces—anger, frustration, extreme poverty and dirty filth everywhere.  But they do have diversity.  There were immigrants from as far away as Sri Lanka to mass gatherings of Muslim Central Africans and associated cultures.  Only an idiot would think that so many people without common beliefs packed on top of each other and prostitutes thrown into the mix was a good idea and evidence of a successful country.  Prior to coming I had only heard about how wonderful the walk down the Boulevard de Strasbourg was.  Well, those people must have been smoking crack, because it was among the worst that I’ve seen in any slum area in the United States—a defeated community failing by the day.  And if it was that bad in the tourist area just think how terrible it would be just a few blocks in on both sides where the tourists don’t go.  My thoughts were to give those people guns, let them fight it out and whoever wins, they would decide the nature of the community because as it is now, pickpockets, prostitutes and con artists are defining the nature of the city and that’s not a good thing.

After about six blocks of this things did improve as we came closer to the river Seine and armed police stood around everywhere with assault weapons ready to gun down any terrorist insurgents. Just two weeks’ prior an Islamic terrorist had assaulted people at the Lourve, which is one of the biggest tourist areas of Paris, so they weren’t taking any chances along the river which is the breadbasket of tourism for Paris.  As long as we were near the river, I could see a glimpse of the Paris that people have been talking about.  But it was like visiting a relative in the hospital whom you know is about to die.  They are there talking to you and you reflect on their life while they are still speaking.  But you can see the specter of death over their shoulders beckoning them to come hither.  Paris was already dead, but the body of tourism just hadn’t yet cooled to show the menace to the drunken westerners looking to fill their illusions of the famous Moulin Rouge and the Hugo epic Les Misérables.   It was a depressing situation far from the kind of optimism I’m used to in America.

As I said, we did get to visit our key sites and I couldn’t help but ponder the layers of mistakes. As beautiful as the old cathedrals like Notre Dame were, everything I could see was just piled up forms of socialism with the churches of the Middle Ages being the first to usher in the kind of collectivism that set Paris up for failure over a thousand years ago, I have read more about this stuff than most people would care to do in a lifetime and I was explaining a bit of it to my kids when were at the Sainte Chapelle because that is a perfect example of what’s wrong with Paris.  In the lower chamber of Sainte Chapelle is a mini cathedral which represents our time on earth.  On both sides of this room are tight spiral staircases which take you up and into the grand room above with large vaulted ceilings and stained glass enclosures 25 feet high.  The spiral staircase represents death—or the birth canal into re-birth into heaven and this was the point of emphasis for the entire Middle Ages for which Paris was founded and the historic foundation visitors relish to this very day.  I was happy to see it but I felt sad for all the suckers over the last thousand years who came to Sainte Chapelle after throwing their piss and shit out their windows into the streets below to worship in this truly magnificent place when the Greek and Romans had lived better 1000 and 2000 years earlier—and to think that what they were doing was cutting edge wonder—is just stupid.  Paris was a city built on the back of the Vico cycle reverting back to the beginning to make the same mistakes all over again which were showing up just a short time later in 2017 where the culture had broken down to this scribbled mess of ancient religions which no longer spoke to the world due to their failure to update themselves to modern science.

Naturally a society so collectively based, and willing to throw away the here and now for the promise of everlasting life shown in the great cathedrals socialism became their new standard and that has led to the present despicable situation. On the way into Gare du Nord by train my wife and I marveled at the beautiful French countryside, but not in the way you might think.  It looked much the way it had for many centuries, and hadn’t changed much.  There were a lot of empty fields and very little industry.  Then suddenly we were in Paris and then the frustrations of poverty were clear with all the defacing graffiti and long looks on the faces of the residents who have been poor all their lives and like the mythology of the Sainte Chapelle have retreated to religion to show them a light at the end of the tunnel. France had chosen poverty for its people and used environmental worship as just the latest religion to control the thoughts of their people into keeping their lives easily confined to the lower room metaphorically of the Sainte Chapelle where the average European has been for over 2000 years.

If France had adopted capitalism that countryside would have shown signs of more factories, nicer homes, and more commercial options like would be found in the United States—like an occasional Crackler Barrel for god’s sake. France and its socialist residents might come to the United States and balk at our unrepentant splendor of capitalism, of our big houses, cars and lifestyles where every few miles across the country are just about anything you could want and eat.  And just like their past in Paris in forcing people into the Catholic religion and the cathedrals there to provide a state sponsored view of the everlasting, they haven’t improved.  Sure they have a separation of church and state now, but not really.  Instead of their religion being a Catholic one inherited from the Roman Empire that conquered them just a few years after the crucifixion of Christ they now have a progressive view of the world where any religion from any place can come and interact freely and without State regulations—which essentially allows every ethnic community to impose their version of Sainte Chapelle on everyone else.  That terrorist who was shot recently at the Louvre threatening tourists with a knife is the same loser who for millennia before was beheading people for not following the rules of the cathedrals and adhering to the state sponsorship of the everlasting.  Now the new religion is environmentalism and it is purposely keeping people poor so that they must look to the “State” for guidance which has created the deplorable situation along the Boulevard de Strasbourg. Sure women are “free” to walk around topless and earn as much money as a man.  The men have been subverted into little shrimps of human flesh walking around in their cosmopolitan “skinny jeans” which obviously have shoved their genitals back up into them squeezing off their masculinity.  And this has left nobody to challenge the failures of their vast socialism and the carcass of Paris which is cooling by the minute as rigor mortis is fast setting in.

Anyone who thinks Paris is a stunning city of “lights” is stuck in the distant past remembering the life that might have been from the vantage point of ignorance. It’s like remembering that abusive parent while they are on their death bed and the one time they bought you a nice snack somewhere, then beat you to a pulp because you used all their money in the act.  Paris has committed suicide many years ago and has slowly been bleeding out all this time leaving us with a fine example of what not to do.  Like all cities of socialism, it was a dirty place filled with crime leaving people desperate to make any money at all begging for it at every opportunity.  Graffiti and crime are only the most obvious signs, but sex workers are the next layer.  When people start selling sex in exchange for opportunity, that’s when you know you have a failing society and need to pass on some of those open green fields and build a few factories.  Paris never had it right, not when they were conquered by the Romans, or settled by the Celts, or spent years at war with Spain and England pawning off their daughters for the promise of peace with a rival kingdom.  Paris has always been a city of suppression even as women celebrate their nudity and their unshaved armpits as Madonna did for Playboy in the eighties to sell America on this garbage—like a big sister trying to get their innocent sibling to smoke cigarettes for the first time.  The socialism of France was sold to us all through rebellion, with sex, violence, and red flagged upheavals—and their net result has been garbage and decay.

I was so glad to get out of Paris that the Coke I had on the way out on the fast train back to England never tasted better. The city lights faded quickly because there was nothing going on in the French countryside past 9 PM, nothing productive.  Nobody was up late working third shift to make bowls for a thriving export, nobody was inventing the newest revelation of science and technology—the French people were just sleeping and paying respect to their latest religion hoping to climb those circular stairs upon their deaths to arrive in the grand room of heaven.  And I was happy to speed right on by for the English Channel.  As we went under the water and came up on the other side, and the time changed I felt relief to have been out of that dreadful place.  England has its problems with socialism too, but at least they are intellectually curious people rooted in the capitalism of language.   It was like that feeling you have after a funeral where the sad stuff is out of the way and you could get back to what you would normally do—you can take off the stuffy suit and put on some shorts and relax with your thoughts. Paris was a disaster and it will take anyone who follows it with it into the oblivion of death—which is the primary driver behind Brexit.  Thank goodness, we are waking up in America because Paris was not an example anybody should follow, and I can say that now with firsthand experience.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

cropped-img_0202.jpg

The Literature of Canterbury: Why America needs to embrace being smarter

I have to be critical of the United States in an unusual way, because my trip to Europe lately was not so much for leisure or extravagance, which has certainly been a part of it. It was to tie up loose ends started many decades ago in many facets of my life. If I didn’t enjoy making money, spending time with my family, and shooting guns—I would have been very happy to be a PHD scholar who spends all his time reading and going over old maps musing about the world and where it’s been and where it’s going.  To a smaller extent, I do that with this blog, which many people think is extensive and tenacious—but it is far from where I’d like to be if I could just commit all my time to literature which I would enjoy immensely.  Unfortunately, I can’t—you have to make decisions in life and time is not infinite—as much as it should be.  Literature for me is a hobby, a foundation for my soul and has always been my secret little joy that I do when everyone goes to bed, or runs out to a dance club.  It’s always been like that for me, and it always will.  So when I had a chance to go to Europe, eat at a three Michelan Star Chef Ramsey restaurant in Chelsea, England and live for a while on the streets of Canterbury, England where much of my favorite literature was born—I did it.canterbury13

Before getting too far ahead however, I have to say that if Donald Trump had not been elected president—I would not have taken the trip. This visit to Canterbury is because of Donald Trump.  I see clearly that America avoided a very narrow precipice toward destruction and now there is a significant opportunity for a major cultural shift in America that will lead the world toward better things.  In all actuality, it reminds me of the Roman conquest of Briton and the pagan tribes which attempted to hold them back.  But it was no use, Rome was a superior culture and it moved into the area that would become Canterbury bringing with it a culture that would mold the future of England forever.  Once the Empire united the kingdom with Christianity Rome fell from power and by 500 AD leaving the area ripe for conquest and that’s when the Indo-Europeans (Celts) moved in and took over the culture.  Then the Vikings knocked on the door and by the time St Augustine was writing his City of God and setting up the first religious center in England just outside the city walls of Canterbury in AD 598 Canterbury has emerged as a hotbed of the foundations of what it met to be human.  It inherited an oriental religion from the Romans which destroyed the empire from the inside out—much the way communism has destroyed modern Europe—all collectivist based societies follow the same trend.  You see the Indo-European came from the region of the Black Sea and had exposure for years to the orient which had worked its way around the south of the Mediterranean Sea for a time.  Jesus Christ had picked up on some of this in the desert during his years of formulation developed through wondering until the events which led to his execution for disrupting the political order of the day.  So it was Catholicism that was inserted upon a culture in Briton which collided with the old pagan stories and gave rise to the Arthurian legends, then The Canterbury Tales, and eventually the work of Charles Dickens and a cast of characters in literature that exceeds description.  Many of the most powerful and persuasive literary figures of our modern times—from 500 AD to the present—worked within a 100 miles of Canterbury.  With that in mind dear reader, you might understand the context of this pilgrimage and why it was so important to me.canterbury15

Here I was walking the same streets that Geoffery Chaucer and Charles Dickens had along with the playwright Marlow and I was witnessing something remarkable. The people of England at least from London to the east coast may be a lot of things—but they were at least very literate.  They read books and they enjoyed the English language.  Now to be honest, part of that is that their roads are too small, so they can’t drive anywhere quick, and their television is terrible.  Their art and culture is certainly built on their reputations, not on their present actions but at least they read.  I was in several book stores in Canterbury during my time in living within the city recently and I saw titles that I had never seen displayed simply because people actually buy them in England.  Back home, the Barnes & Noble in West Chester which is quite large, or the same store on Newport on the Levee carry a lot of books, but they are more geared toward the trends of today—the things that sell in America—50 Shades of Grey, Harry Potter, and Game of Thrones.  In England, people still read for fun and they do it often—which shows directly in their language.

Even the stupid people in England are smarter than most people in the United States and you can tell that by the way people speak and how their minds frame ideas. In England people naturally treat their language with great emphasis on the intelligence from which it pours forth and they take the time to guard it—where in America we have adopted every slang term imposed on us by every trend that has emerged.  For example, one criticism that many have about me is that I use too many big words when speaking to them.  They think I’m purposely trying to make them feel stupid because they don’t have the same vocabulary range that I do.  But that’s not necessarily the case.  I have read so many books over the years that I speak that way naturally all the time—it is a function of being literate.  Just like a body builder might have big muscles, a person who reads a lot will have a well-defined intellect.  And in England they do.  I heard a homeless person just yesterday uttering rhetoric of insanity about the stars in the sky and he was using words in such a way that the average suburbanite in America never does—because it’s not part of their experience.  The American has given up on literature and actually embraces stupidity to make “others” feel better about their lackluster existence where in England they tend to look at such people as “rubbish” and treat them as such.  They figure if someone isn’t going to learn the proper words for things—then they probably don’t have much value for things and should be discarded.

As I provided this little history lesson to set up this idea, the English language of Canterbury and all the literature that followed was not indigenous to the area. Many cultures rose and fell before Geoffrey Chaucer wrote his masterpiece Canterbury Tales so it’s not like they are preserving some deep history.  It is just the nature of those people to embrace thinking even if the root cause of their economic depravity and lack of scientific invention is rooted in their incursion of an oriental religion—Christianity.  Their foundations into literature at least have elevated their culture to have a solid foundation to build from, and America would do well to adopt those same methods.canterbury14

I went to many museums around London, Paris, and Canterbury and I can report that the children are different from they are in America. Parents still teach their kids things in England and form strong bonds that last their lifetimes whereas in America too much Paris has migrated into our culture there and people are too rootless to teach children much of anything—and that is a mistake.  Intelligence should be celebrated and nurtured, not avoided and pissed upon—and in America we take it for granted.  We celebrate stupidity and it shows in our values for books and the process for learning.

The election of Donald Trump I know is going to make a lot of people unhappy, because like the cultures in Europe conquered by so many superior cultures, this new president is a game changer. He may be viewed in history the way William the Conqueror was in England, or even Napoleon in France.  As much as history baulks at such aggressive characters it is in their wake that great works of art have furthered the human race and the same will now happen in America—the “Trumpian age.”  So part of that new Trumpian age needs to embrace literature.  Trump himself may not be the most literate person in the world, but he doesn’t need to be.  The values that come out of his presidency however could—and that starts with embracing values that are positive and throwing away those that aren’t.  As I said at the beginning of this, if Hillary Clinton were still president, I would not have taken this trip to Europe.  I wouldn’t want to see what the progressives wanted to do to America.  But now I can visit and observe the mistakes and the successes, and bring home the summation of both to apply to American culture.  And the most obvious thing to me is the protection of the written word and elevating its value in our North American culture.   That alone would go a long way to solving many of our national problems—teaching people to read again and to enjoy the process would go a long way to enriching our American life to be the leader of the free world and all those wanting to become free.   It all starts with what you accept in your mind—which therefor comes out in your mouth.  And in Canterbury, England, they still love their literature and for me it was a relief to see.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

cropped-img_0202.jpg

The Next Generation of Mass Transit: America’s version of Europe’s train system

img_3759

 

I’ve never had much of a passionate thought about train travel because in the United States—we just don’t do it. We have cars and massive highways, and we love our independence. My main experience with trains is in the novel Atlas Shrugged, the monorail at Disney World, and the train ride at Kings Island, the amusement park near my home in Cincinnati, Ohio.  So during a recent trip to Europe and being without a car, I had to learn quickly how to use trains, because honestly, they are the most efficient way to get around.  European cities are just so densely packed as they frustrate suburban development forcing most of their residents into their metropolises.  So having a car in London, or Paris, just as it is in New York in the U.S. just doesn’t make much sense—because parking is nearly impossible and traveling down the roads is ridiculously slow.  With that in mind, getting around London, Paris or between them into the countryside requires trains which I’ve used heavily lately and to a great effect.  The trains in England are quite nice and I have enjoyed using them covering ground from as far south as Brighton, to Canterbury and using the Eurostar from London to Paris under the English Channel.  It was the combination of those experiences which launched my mind on the new train technology being developed in the United States called the Hyperloop—which is an Elon Musk initiation that is being extensively tested this summer outside of Las Vegas.  In fact it looks like the UAB will be among the first cities of the world to buy into the concept which will make the Eurostar look like an archaic dinosaur regarding train travel.  The Hyperloop will take passengers at near the speed of sound and faster which will significantly change the world.

I love that America is built around individualized transportation, but I personally have a need to get around the country quickly—so these high-speed trains are appealing to me. I would love to take a train to Orlando, Florida from Cincinnati to justify a season pass to Disney World so I could take my grandkids there many times throughout the year.  Flying is just a bit too expensive leaving an alternative form in need to fill the market demand.  Since America doesn’t yet have a complex train system like they do in Europe this leaves the United States prime to develop one of their own using the new hyperloop technology as the centerpiece.

This whole train thing really came to life for me at the St. Pancras station in London which shares space across the street from Kings Cross. My wife and I were eating some sushi from the dining area and I was watching all the people coming and going as we awaited our train into the countryside to visit Canterbury.  It was like a mini airport that was carrying a tremendous amount of people to and from.  I was able to visit many more thereafter at Ashford International and as far south as Gare Du Nord in Paris and I have to say it was an impressive system that allowed me to get around an enormous part of Northern Europe quickly and without insulting my time.  While on the trains I was able to read and rest which I appreciated and I found myself hundreds of miles away within an hour and that was something that would greatly benefit the American economy because of the vast spaces we enjoy in North America.

Trains are best in relieving traffic. I experienced this of course in London and Paris, but over the last year have seen it most effectively used in Kobe, Japan where dinner guests came up from the south quicker than they ever could have by car, simply because dense cities don’t have anywhere to park leaving the roads stagnant messes.  To solve the problem of America’s dying cities, wealth needs to be imported back into them by a means that allows people to utilize what they offer.  For instance, Cincinnati, Atlanta and Detroit should be part of a shared market—people should be able to conduct business between those places easily and within the same day—such as a lunch meeting in Atlanta for an hour or two then jumping back up to Detroit by the end of the business day.

When Ayn Rand wrote, Atlas Shrugged she believed that America would have a series of train systems like the Eurostar all over the country, and that they would be privately owned—which would be optimal.  One of the weaknesses of the publicly owned ones in Europe that has solicited private investment and is doing a better job in turning a profit, but the ghosts of their government owned days is evident–they are not always on time.  And at this point, I would love to have a Eurostar type of system in America.  Since we don’t I would think that the Hyperloop would be the technology that would demand the investment priorities.  In the video included from Twitter I was thinking about how fast we were really going while my wife was buying us some snacks in the dining car.  It was easy to walk around and the drinks didn’t slide around on our tables never threatening to tip over.  The ride was very smooth and comfortable which has been the promise of the Hyperloop.  At the time I took the video the Eurostar was going about 150 MPH, and sometimes it was going faster.  The distance between Paris and London which was the length we were traveling is 459 miles and we did it in just under 2 hours.  It would have taken three times longer by car.  This allowed my family to go to Paris for the day and still be back in London in time for dinner.  Without the Eurostar we would have never been able to do such a thing.  Flying would have been too expense and too complicated and driving would have taken way too long.  And regarding security and passport verifications, everything was done for us before we even got on the train.  Once we were in Paris, we simply got out of the train and headed to our destinations with the immigration issues already don’t at the front of the line—quickly.  Having something similar in America would certainly lead to economic expansion for the cities and would even have an impact on the voting patterns—because currently only liberals live in cities making it impossible for Republicans to get elected.  The best way to change a city’s culture is to allow people of value from other places to come in and have an impact—but you don’t want to trap them otherwise they’ll keep their money and input into the suburbs.

I can see Hyperloop terminals all over the United States much like Europe has train stations. They could be vibrant places that move people across vast distances quickly, and cheaply expanding our economic output.  And it could be a uniquely American thing, just as Europe has established itself on trains.  Trains are too slow for me, but Hyperloop could be the best answer for a nation that hasn’t yet invested in mass transit.  I would love to have something like St. Pancras station in West Chester, Ohio—or Monroe.  There was something exciting about sitting at that station and knowing that I could buy an affordable ticket to Italy and be there in a few hours while eating sushi.  It was strange to send a text to my daughter who was in Canterbury from London and saying to her that we’d be there within an hour.   It’s only 61 miles, but with the tiny roads that they have in England, it would be more than a two-hour drive.  That allowed us to step onto a train and be at her doorstep before she could get ready for dinner and that was an efficient use of time.  Something that America could use and the Hyperloop is just the right technological advance.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

cropped-img_0202.jpg

Mystery of the British Museum’s Crystal Skull: Why its not a fake, but many wish it were

It was one of the things I most wanted to see in London—the famous crystal skull at the British Museum. The idea that an ancient civilization was able to carve such a fine sculpture out of quartz without obvious machining marks in the 14th century, or even before, is quite remarkable so I wanted to see it for myself.   The artifact is famous because it is one of the few of its kind in the world and it was acquired by the British Museum at that magical time of early archaeology when the British empire still held sway and was able to gather important items around the world before a new generation of politics and war would further destroy the art and relics of the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas—especially in Mexico where their Mexican Revolution at the start of the 20th Century has all but destroyed their economy leaving the people there impoverished.  If any crystal skulls were found today in those regions they would without question be in private collections sold off by locals who needed to feed themselves.  It was remarkable that the crystal skull featured here even made it to the British Museum as it was acquired from the Tiffany and Co. from New York in 1897 after being owned originally by Eughen Boban who was an early fortune hunter able to gather up objects from digs before the Smithsonian, and the British Museum were able to lay claim to the historic record.  For something that old, it certainly couldn’t have seen modern methods of cutting a quartz structure so for anybody to go to such trouble to make a crystal skull there had to be a good reason for it.crystal-skull

The skull is in the “living and dying” wing of the museum stuck away in the corner much the way that the Cincinnati Tablet is at the Museum Center in my home town of Cincinnati—they really don’t know what to do with it because it doesn’t fit their narrative of a primitive people. In Cincinnati the tablet doesn’t fit the profile of the Adena Indians and at the British Museum which many contributes have already laid claim to their version of history and feel they possess the narrative of history by being the first to report it—the crystal skull is sort of a mystery—so they put it in the corner of the room leaving it in limbo.  In fact it was so unobtrusive I had to ask where it was.  I found a museum worker who pointed it out to me then felt the need to let me know that the skull was a “fake” which irritated me greatly.  There was no need for the additional commentary, but the guy felt he needed to make sure I knew his opinion of the crystal skull which revealed a lot about what I had long suspected about this particular museum.

The collection at the British Museum is one of the finest in the world and it could be argued that their imperialism which acquired all the artifacts there robbed the home countries of their “birth rights” to those cultures. But as we’ve seen in Cairo, Baghdad and other places around the world, especially in Mexico City where the ruins of an Aztec civilization were literally buried underneath—new cultures usually destroy old cultures and the British Museum was able to save those artifacts in time because of their audacity to take them from their domestic lands—which were unstable to the historical record.  The museum has an extensive membership list that is very active, and they depend on their donations to keep everything on the upside—and they are very successful.  However, to preserve that funding model they need to lay claim to the historical narrative created by the British Museum, so to preserve the integrity of their members and donors.  That concern was reflected in the museum worker’s proclamation to me that the crystal skull was a fake—because he didn’t want me to be one of those guys to further perpetuate the many theories that the skull may belong to an undiscovered culture not yet in the museum—which is highly likely—and was the source of my interest.crystal-skull-2

The failure of the premise that the British Museum established, for which the worker represented was that it was inconceivable that the Spanish conquest of Mexico in 1521 was interacting with a superior culture at the time since it has been established that European culture was the dominate one and that everyone they interacted with was inferior. We see this with the discovery of America by Columbus—even though the Chinese were obviously already in America and trading around the world—and that the Vikings were likely already in America several centuries earlier.  Even more perplexing, which is obvious to me, the mound builders of England, Ireland and likely Scandinavia likely were trading with the Phoenicians from the south, maybe even Egypt and were in the New World building mounds like those at Nework in Ohio well before Christ was born.  The British Museum ignores all these issues and sticks to their story that Europe conquered the world and thus making them the authors of history.  Relics like the crystal skull challenge that.crystal-skull-3

After looking at the skull closely with an electron microscope scan, there is evidence that some of the features were carved using a rotary cutting wheel of some kind.   Note the word, “some.”  There are many parts of the crystal skull that defy even modern methods of manufacture so there is still great mystery as to how the thing was even made by today’s standards, let along done at a time before the telephone existed.  And there is evidence that what Spain conquered in Mexico was far advanced in many ways to the Europeans, especially in canal building and astronomy.  So there is guilt in the statement—the “crystal skull is fake.”  Guilt that the very things the British Museum is supposed to guard against—the loss of information advanced by the many cultures of the world—the evidence says that a lot of the world’s cultures have been lost and the Europeans are very guilty of building their Catholic religion on top of conquests to erase the memory of what came before—which I think the crystal skull represents most.brisish-museum2

The science of history is in its infancy, even in the Room of Enlightenment—which was my favorite room in the museum—it is obvious that our grasp of history is rather shallow, and all we know is from the private collections of kings, or the little bits of junk acquired from dealers who looted tombs and cultures to sell on the black market. The best stuff is still out there locked away in private collections and museum basements lacking a proper explanation that fits with the story of history that has been told to us from our infancies.  History is much more complicated and to know it is to understand the crystal skull culture and other mysteries that are out there which have not been given a proper introduction to the world because too many people—especially of European decent—call things fake—when they are obviously not.  The crystal skull of the British Museum is more than just an artifact, it is a glimpse into the human race who had an obsession with death and wanted to face it literally—and an old habit of doing what should be impossible for the benefit of doing it and perplexing those from the future with the valor of their endeavors.britsh-museum

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

cropped-img_0202.jpg

What’s Behind the Trump Protests in London: Socialists fighting for the right to be lazy

What the media is not telling you dear reader about all these “spontaneous” riots of “concerned” people protesting Donald Trump around the world, and his immigration policies, is that they are organized by dirty, rotten scum bag socialists that draw like flies on shit the stink of the most lazy and uninformed of our human species. They are not “people” as reported by the media concerned over the direction of the world led by Donald Trump trying to challenge him wherever he may show up to cast an influence—but they are insurgents of the group Socialist International still attempting to cast the world into the doom of global communism, just like they had in the Soviet Union and as they do now in China.  The media which is advancing this plot that they learned in their public institutions as silly, drunken pre-adult losers mean to destroy Donald Trump because he is not only now the leader of the free world, but an unapologetic capitalist who is rebuilding the wealth of America at a rate that is terrifying to them.  Because capitalists and communists in any form cannot work together toward a common goal.  One side must lose to the other because their fundamental philosophies are just too different and the war we are witnessing can be summed up that simply.

Of course you’ll want proof dear reader of my bombastic statements, especially in regard to these so-called “Not My President” rallies which “sprang up” across the world, particularly in the progressive cities of New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. I happened to be in London for a number of reasons, and was down by Parliament to see Theresa May defend Brexit from the House of Lords attempting to waver back in the direction of Tony Blair and the avocation of a “European Union” which again is a Socialist International plot to spread global socialism then communism to every corner of the world.  It was in fact in London where Karl Marx did most of his work toward that collective based monstrosity that leads directly to economic depravity. So I happened to be right next to the “spontaneous” group that gathered in the park across from parliament in the shadow of Big Ben which was made to look so much bigger on television than it really was.  And I gathered up the pictures you need as proof to understand what I’m saying and have been now for many years.  Socialist advocates are behind all these global protests, even the Black Lives Matter endeavors.  They do not want peace with anything in a capitalist country and cannot be reasoned with.  So as a civilization we must drag them kicking and screaming to a bitter bloody ending across the finish line of prosperity and ignore their utterings—because in the scheme of things they are completely worthless.trump-protests4

You will notice from the pictures I took at the London rally all the red tents—well those were there to pass out socialist literature—and there were a lot of them. In many ways, it broke my heart to see so many red flag waving socialists and their tents of Marxism set up at the feet of Winston Churchill’s statue.  He would be literally rolling over in his grave if he knew that—because it goes against everything we fought in World War II and many other wars.  The Marxist types who formed this destructive philosophy started in the mid-19th Century and everywhere they proposed themselves destruction and war has been in their wake.  Today their influence is everywhere, from the union strike of British Airways by their cabin crew looking for a “living wage” to the nearly complete conquest of the Asian countries by communism as it flowed down out of Russia into those villages of China, Korea, and Vietnam.  In fact that whole mess in China and Vietnam started just a few miles to the south of these London protests in Paris where the future Vietnamese leader wanted a voice at the Treaty Versailles convention.  He didn’t get it, so he went to the rickety little building across the street that was spreading communism in Paris and they did listen to him—so be became philosophically aligned and the rest is history.  The protests of the Vietnam War by the press wasn’t so much about the many deaths that the United States and other countries suffered among their young people fighting communism there—it was that those armies fighting Ho Chi Minh were trying to stop communism which the political left were trying to advance in the same manner that these protests in London against Donald Trump were being presented.trump-protests5

What was even stranger about the London protests is that the people participating were not people who voted for Donald Trump. In the United States, at least they could claim to be concerned about a president they didn’t vote for.  Heck, I never accepted Barack Obama as my president—and it had nothing to do with his color.  He was an idiot advocating global socialism which was why I rejected him.  So I can understand people who didn’t vote for Donald Trump being upset—because I have been for the last 24 years in not having a good president in the White House whom I could respect.   But in London, these people were so concerned about Donald Trump that they felt they had to protest as if he were already the president of the world—which actually tells you quite a lot about the role America plays in global matters.  The socialist know that Donald Trump could destroy all the progressive gains they’ve made against capitalism for the last 100 years, and it is that which they are fighting against.trump-protests2

The people at the rally in London were not just concerned moms afraid that they wouldn’t be able to kill a baby if they engaged in reckless sex with some libitard at a late night bar covered in cologne from Harrod’s on a wild night in London, or gay rights advocates hoping to water down the sexes so that expectations of behavior would be bent to the most lazy of our society allowing unclean losers to have a shot at more potential “partners” than they do now—or complacent idiots who want to play video games all day could with a “living wage” so they would not have to worry about working a real job and paying all their bills—their rent, their cars, and their online fees. They were pawns in a giant game of chess intent to weaken the human race.  As I looked at their faces close up their stories were obvious.  Most of the men were the type who had moms who did pay all their fees for online gaming because the women felt guilty at not providing strong role models for the young lads who were now stringy haired losers barely able to function in society.  The loudest voices at that rally were the type of young men who had watched many lovers enter their mother’s lives and dirty her up leaving them without the prospect of a good clean family life into their adulthoods—so they turned to collectivist philosophies as a way to normalize their personal tragedies—and now Donald Trump was a severe threat to their choices made so far in life.  But even the conditions which made those young protestors are the result of liberal policies—the young women their mom’s used to be were taught they could have the world and everything in it if only they asked for it.  If they wanted to sleep with lots of men, they had the pill.  If they acquired AIDS through reckless sex, they’d have Hollywood stars show up at their bedside and sing songs to the media.  They were taught that lives were conducted without consequence and that big daddy government would be the new husband while Hollywood helped cultivate the image that the great men of the world would now be versions of Homer Simpson.  Now the people who bought that view of the world most were forced to deal with an alpha male Donald Trump who had a gorgeous supermodel wife who was an immigrant herself which diffuses all their arguments toward socialism, and they are genuinely terrified.  This wasn’t the world they were promised as budding young socialists.  The capitalists were coming back in style and no matter what tricks they played, people weren’t listening.trump-protests3

So these protestors of Donald Trump are not normal people, they are rejects from a failed society who haven’t yet figured out that the greatest threat to the future of our species isn’t global warming, immigration, or even racism—its stupidity.  And stupidity flourishes under communism and socialism because it takes competition out of the equation which allows the half-baked stringy haired losers to have an equal opinion to the well-read orator who has spent their life perfecting ideas and concepts.  It just doesn’t work and that was the real summation of what was behind the London Trump protests.  The leaders weren’t well-intentioned citizens of the world, they were radicals fighting to keep the bar of human achievement low so that they could stay relevant.  And the media is in the bag for those insurgents because they are looking for the same assurances—and under a Trump presidency, they won’t get it.  And that is why they protest—and the only reason why.trump-protests

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

cropped-img_0202.jpg