Month: March 2017

“Snitches get Stitches”: Why black on black crimes go unsolved

I think we need to talk about something seriously, because as Michael Bennett of the Seattle Seahawks reminded me with his stupid Tweet regarding Tom Brady’s Super Bowl Jersey—the police in Cincinnati are chasing ghosts in regard to the Cameo Night Club shooting, which is the same kind of thing witnessed in the killings that Bennett brought up. With all the cameras at the Cameo Night Club on Saturday March 25th 2017 and the off duty cops outside, nobody seems to know who opened fire into a hip hop dance crowd shooting 17 and killing at least one.  The shooters got away and nobody is talking.  All police know as of this writing is that there were a few of them, but what’s unexplained is how the guns got into the club when people were scrutinized through security and why nobody has any real leads when it was also reported that the shooting appears to have erupted after a scuffle earlier that day between two groups of people.  Surely, we know the names of the people in those two groups?  Surely the bartenders, owner, and other people present knew somebody who knew somebody, who knew somebody.

The sad answer is that police do know who was involved, as does everyone at the club. Correctly the owner of the club surrendered his liquor license that following morning, so that Cameo Night Club is now officially out of business.  It should be remembered that as the global media pounced on the story that day before the sun even came up, they were talking about gun violence in an American night club in India for God’s sake.  CNN, FOX—everyone was covering the story in Cincinnati and to my knowledge I was the very first person in the world who told the real story early that same morning—because I’m from the area and know something about the history of Cameo.  It wasn’t guns that caused all the violence—it was the hip hop culture the club itself that did—and once that became evident—the story virtually died on the spot.   Nobody in the mainstream media wanted to talk about black on black violence for all the same reasons they don’t want to talk about it in Chicago or any other urban neighborhood where hip hop culture percolates.  When guns couldn’t easily be blamed, the media lost interest and that was that.

I stated the problem quite correctly on Sunday morning what the issue was and the police confirmed it as the investigation drug on for the entire next week. The people in the club were reluctant to rat out the shooters is basically what it came down to.  What do they say in da’ hood?  “Snitches get stitches” and so nobody said anything with any meaning pointing to an arrest.  It is utterly astonishing that police couldn’t gather up enough evidence to pull people into a series of arrests for the massive violence which did occur.  Instead what we got was a half-hearted vigil heavily promoted by the local news trying to pull on people’s heart strings in the suburbs enough to drive some sort of narrative against social gun violence.  But it didn’t work.

It’s not racist to say it—even though modern politics would seek to say otherwise—but people lost interest in the story because we have become used to violence associated with hip hop culture and normal people recognize that the thug culture that was commonly attending the Cameo Club were asking for trouble and when it happened—nobody was surprised. It’s not that everyone involved was black in skin color—it’s the behavior they exhibit which gave clear indications that violence is an expected part of the hip hop lifestyle and that for many in that culture, it’s a badge of honor.  So why would anybody rat out someone who gunned down a bunch of innocent people when that kind of behavior seems to be the goal of their movement.  Just listen to their music, the whole story is quite clear as to their social intentions.

So what is Michael Bennett referring to when he stated that Tom Brady managed to get his jersey back but there are still black on black crimes still not solved? Well, he’s assuming that when a rich white guy married to a supermodel wants something the world will bend over backwards to give it to him—which propels the myth about all this “white privilege” nonsense.  What Bennett is ignoring is that in “white” culture people generally cooperate with the law and seek to live with some sense of tolerance toward each other.  So getting Tom Brady’s Super Bowl jersey back from some Mexican peddler had a beginning, middle and end to that case that the FBI agents were able to focus on.  But in the case of the Cameo Night Club there was a beginning—people were shot dead innocently likely in most cases—but there was no second and third part.

There is no obvious way to identify the shooters because there were so many like-minded people present and the survivors were protecting the identity out of their urban culture code against cops.  So step two is very difficult.  But even if police do find out who the shooters were, what then?  The shooters won’t be able to obtain a lawyer so there isn’t any money for the legal system to make off the situation meaning all the costs of a trial will go to the state.  Then when they are prosecuted they’ll just go to the prison system where the cells are literally overflowing with people just like them for the same stupid stuff.  It is far less costly to keep them on the streets killing others of their kind unfortunately.  If they move out into the suburbs, then that becomes another matter.  But if the killings are in the “hood,” in our society it is an acceptable casualty statistic because the cost is great either way.  Whether the violence takes place in prison or on the streets, it is less cumbersome on our legal system to have the violence occur on the streets because there isn’t any solution in arrests.  If arrests are made the behavior won’t change and you stick tax payers with a burden they don’t want to pay for.  So the police are in sheer limbo so inaction is what happens.

To answer Michael Bennett, we don’t know who killed Tupac because the answer takes you to a bottomless pit of violent subhuman behavior that cannot be managed by our current legal system. It’s as simple as that. If you are a cop, by the time you sort through all the “baby mommas” and hostile welfare recipients who shut the door in your face all day long and get to some honest leads—you run into little street thugs who think it’s cool not to talk to police and they’d rather not rat out a member of their community—even if they are a rival.  Remember, snitches get stitches in their hip hop culture—so nobody talks.  Then when you do make an arrest some liberal loser becomes their public attorney and case-law ends up being written that screws up the legal system forever because of the case you are working on, so in a really dysfunctional way, the best thing to do is to let the villains stay free so that the responsibility for their correction doesn’t fall on state authority powerless to do anything about the situation.

Yeah, I know, what I said was really mean—but it’s the truth. Nobody wants to deal with a pain in the ass and the members of the hip hop community are just a huge pain in the ass that nobody can sympathize with.  When you try to treat them fairly they want more tax money, and they want reparations for slavery which was banned over a hundred years ago.  When you move out of their neighborhood because you don’t want to park next to a purple Cadillac with inner tubes on for tires and dressed out in all brass and gold trimmings they call you a racist.  Then when they are all together they shoot each other over baby momma rights and turf boundaries.  I can promise that the people at the Cameo Club were not NRA members, and even after we have thrown millions and millions of tax dollars at the people who were in that club its likely most of them there couldn’t have even spelled the name of the popular gun lobby group.  That is why Mr. Bennett that the black on black murders continue and nobody does anything about it.  Because when Tom Brady got back his Super Bowl jersey at least he said thank you.  When it comes to unsolved murders like Tupac or the shooting at Cameo’s—everyone just clams up and makes the job impossibly hard.  So the police lose interest because they are caught between a rock and a hard place both of which the politics of our day have put them in.  And that’s why nothing ever gets fixed and never will under this present system.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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When Snowflakes Melt: The coming crises of tomorrow

I did manage to catch some of the Rush Limbaugh Show during lunch on 3-28-2017 and he was making some excellent points about the nature of our modern “snowflakes” as we are calling them now. It was a topic I have been talking about for more than twenty years—in fact longer.  Even when I was in my school years I was concerned about how different the people were in the 80s than they were from the westerns I watched as a kid where everyone was polite to everyone else, intelligence was celebrated and chivalry—especially toward women was considered a virtue.  I was concerned as a high school student that we had fallen too far from our core American values.  Kids liked to drink and do drugs too much—casual sex was destructively too common for the needed process of romance which then built families.  I dated a lot of girls back then but the relationships fell apart within two weeks as they craved more what they were used to from their parents and it was obvious that I was far too serious of a person for casual fun—or a boy toy.  Even back then I was much more interested in very deep topics as opposed to what musical bands were popular—or what my favorite beer was.  As an anthropology student in high school I was one of those kids who read USA Today every morning in my home room class before preparing for that class which was one of the few that I really enjoyed—I looked at my classmates and I was really concerned about the future of America because they just weren’t cutting the mustard.  I disliked them so much because of what they were that I have not communicated with any of them for over twenty years now.  I bump into someone here and there, but I don’t communicate with anybody—essentially because I am let down by what they have become.

 (Check out the 25 minute mark for the best examples)

But let me tell you something—compared to today, my generation which graduated in 1986 was a beacon of morality compared to the kids of today and as Rush said during his broadcast, one of our greatest shortages coming over the next few decades is in the intelligence of our youth. They have been deliberately destroyed by our public education system and we are facing a true crisis as a country.  The biggest fear we have is not of artificial intelligence taking over as it often does in science fiction movies—it’s in the inability of our society to meet the challenges of tomorrow—because as the snowflakes that they’ve become, they melt upon the slightest heat—and simply cannot endure the stresses of our times.

Probably the hardest personal thing for me was in raising two daughters in a time when I knew that the direction our society was moving was wrong. Again, it probably helped me greatly to have as one of my main hobbies a love for studying history and culture—because I could see it clearly and was able to teach my kids in ways that society wasn’t—and they turned out to be fantastic young people and continue to be.  But they were girls and that typically means they’ll want to date boys and as I looked around the boys in their age group sucked.  That wasn’t just because I was protective of my girls—of course I was as all dads should be, but because the boys they had out there as options to date did not share their value system which my kids gained from living under my roof.  So that was a problem and was probably the worst years of my life because you have to let them live, but you know they are encountering a tangled mess and they had to go through the pain of sorting it out as individuals which was really hard to watch.  I still have a really tough time with it.  When I deal with people in that generation I just assume I’m talking to a child that needs excessive patience—much more patience than I’m comfortable with providing.  I can do it, but I usually just steam under my hat because they just don’t have the basic foundations to understand much of anything I say to them.  One dumb boy who dated my youngest daughter actually argued with me about the value of Chick-fil-A over their position against gays.  First problem was that you don’t argue with me, especially in my house or treat me like some kind of equal to his sluggish ass.  Second was the kid was so incredibly lazy and unfocused.  I had to let my daughter go through the dating patterns and realize on her own the direction of things, so I tried to let her live her life.  But the kid was just so stupid—it made me miserable to look at him.  He grew up without a father and his mother coddled him to the point where he never thought he was wrong about anything so he truly didn’t know how to interact with an alpha male like me.  I took that into consideration for my daughter’s sake, but it was painful.  My concerns went far beyond the fact that no boy would be good enough for my girls—it was literally the fact that no boy was good enough for my girls because they had been taught incorrectly from infants on how to be good people as adults.  And the crippling of these young people was intentional by our education institutions.

My generation was wave one of the dumbed down society, my kids were wave two. The Department of Education was legalized as an institution while I was in grade school and from there public education went downhill fast.  I’ve watched a lot of the kids my children played with grow up and some of them are alright—but they all have suffered with dealing against a world that deliberately put low expectations on them only to drown a little bit each day by their inner desires for personal excellence—because the world was determined not to give it to them.  That has left a level of exasperation on their faces that is clear to me—a silent reservation of understanding that mediocrity is the ruler of our times for which the human race has never really accepted at our cores.  But these days instead of doing something about it in our lives we yearn for empowerment in our television, sports and movies.  But increasingly even in those formats the concept of nobility and valor are evaporating.  In movies and television shows dads are portrayed as dumbasses, women are overbearing tyrants hell-bent on forging their own professions away from the family unit, and children are always the smartest people in the room.   That was a long way from Gunsmoke and Bonanza which is what I grew up on where older people were there to help young people reason through complicated problems with good advice when needed most.  No, these days the primary concern of the day is change from a good country into a bad one by turning off the minds of our youth with drugs, sex, and liberal educations so that they will grow up to be drones to progressive thinking—which we are starting to see in abundance presently.  Even if we changed course right now and the Trump administration gets things fixed over the next eight years it will take at least twenty more years to see a turnaround in personal human philosophy within the family unit that would be productive on a macro scale.  We are truly in a crisis because that means two generations of people will not be functioning correctly in our American government and our businesses—because they are not intellectually equipped for the job.  Old people like me will have to work longer and harder to keep the train on the tracks and the very young will have to enter the workplace sooner so that they can save this current breed of snowflakes from their undeveloped minds.

I’ve talked about it for such a long time but yet in the back of my mind I hoped to be a little wrong—but I wasn’t. This generation of “snowflakes” have been brought up in day cares and their core value system was shaped in those terrible places of collectivism and stunted development.  There is no way to trick F**k the system.  You can’t take away a biological mother and replace it with a paid babysitter who is watching eight other children and expect those kids to grow up correctly because that’s just not how human beings are wired.  The liberal experiment of this Brave New World has been an utter failure and the ramifications of it are upon us—and it’s hard to look at.   I don’t blame the kids so much as I do the system they grew up in, but never-the-less, we have a major problem and there is no easy way out of it.  There will be no real retirement for my generation and things won’t be easy for the current generation that grows up under Trump as president because they’ll have to be rushed into the marketplace just to keep the ship floating—and we’ll be stuck with over 100 million louses who can’t think for themselves and melt under the slightest pressure as they are ruined for life and our compassion for them will force us to carry them along kicking and screaming at every inconvenience.  And that is the greatest crises of our coming tomorrow.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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Turning the Corner in the War: Why Ted Kopple was really mad

I spent a few days thinking about this topic before addressing it, because it really does mark a turning point in this war. I first realized the scope of the war when I was pitching screenplays to Hollywood from 1995 until 2005.  I learned a lot about the “business” over that ten-year period which of course carries directly over to the experiences Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity had on the Ted Kopple interview shown by a recent CBS Sunday show.  I was obviously a conservative writer and I didn’t think it would matter that I didn’t think the way the people in the business thought.  I thought they’d find my perspectives fresh and perhaps a throwback to the period where Hollywood had great success.  But what I learned pretty much reflects the subtle pain that I heard in Rush’s voice all during Monday March 27, 2017.  Sean Hannity too seemed wounded by the outright rejection of the great Ted Kopple.  Of course, they played it down, but I could hear it in their voices, and I understood.  Intellectually, they always knew they were different than Ted, but on a human level—they are peers and wanted to at least participate in the arena of debate even if the people on the other side were wackos.  They honestly liked Ted and at some deep level, wanted his approval.  Ted Kopple represented to them the media and as sick as we all know that media to be—they wanted to help it be better with debate.  What Ted Kopple did was ignite one last bomb hoping to stop the loss that Democrats are experiencing.  It was like an ugly divorce where a person you thought you loved at one point in your life yells at you—“I never enjoyed making love to you because you have bad breath.”  That is essentially what Ted Kopple did to Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh on Sunday March 26th 2017 on his little morning show.

I call it a war because it was obvious to me that’s what it has been. “They” didn’t care what the casualties were—they certainly didn’t care about my wife and kids.  Once I put myself out there in an artistic way, then took very strong positions against casual sex and drugs—representing the Midwest in California—they didn’t care who they destroyed in my life so long as I felt the pain of it.  I have never seen so much hatred and vitriol as was expressed at me in such a passive aggressive manner than in those years mentions above.  In essence I was told that I would never write a book, or a movie, or do anything in the media and that nobody would see or hear from me because they controlled all the avenues in the media and I would never get through.  I never tried to force feed anything to them, I was just being my Midwestern Cincinnati self.  I would remind them that Steven Spielberg and Tom Cruise came from Cincinnati for which they would say that “they” became one of us instead of expecting us to become them.  Well, there was some truth to that—I did intend to change their point of view through creative debate which is how I thought things were supposed to be.  Instead I learned that they weren’t open to those types of experiences.   Instead, they were on a mission to convert all of us into bleeding heart liberals or else, and that was the focus of their agenda and the cause of this “war in America.”

It was a very disheartening thing to learn that Hollywood was not the place I grew up loving, or even the place that made all the great westerns I watched as a kid with my grandparents. It was a propaganda machine mostly that was hell-bent on liberal advocacy.  It was even worse than Robert Altman’s The Player—it was even more corrosive than what was revealed in that very good movie about Hollywood life and how to make it there.  The business wasn’t about producing the best script, or even being the best director—it was more about who you knew and what they could do for you—it was mass collectivism on overdrive and that wasn’t for me.  Naturally I toyed around with self-producing but to do that you have to come up with a lot of money and its always very risky.  I’m at a point where I will likely produce a film with a budget of 5 to 10 million range with an aim at Netflix now that more options for distribution are available with less union rules.  But I decided way back in 2005 that I wasn’t going to play the conventional game and that I would go it alone in everything because technology and the market had caught up to the business in a way that decentralized it.

Ted Kopple specifically mentioned that in his piece on Rush Limbaugh citing the “fairness doctrine” from 1987. In his mind if only the “system” could have stayed in control his news on CBS would still be relevant and Donald Trump wouldn’t be president.  But because of Sean Hannity, because of Rush Limbaugh and thousands of people like me who have taken advantage of deregulation of information—the old way of progressivism can’t compete and their world is coming to an end.  As I was at a film festival in 2006 doing whip stunts for producers who might use those techniques in films, I was already thinking of how things had changed and the gate keepers were no longer needed.  If you had talent and ambition, the technology was certainly there to step around the old guards—like Ted Kopple—and do your own thing.  That is why the political left is praising Google and Facebook for censorship because they hope that they will become the new gatekeepers.  But if either company commits too far into that realm, some other company will rise up to compete with them—that’s the beauty of this age of deregulation.

I was told no by those gatekeepers so many times that I relished this age where I can write all I want—novels, articles—films, anything I’d like to and I have a means of distribution that doesn’t involve anybody really. I can say honestly, I saw it coming a long time ago.  It is much harder to get wealthy off the entertainment industry because with freedom comes abundance and these days so many people are involved that the costs have come down to the extent where the buckets of gold for a well written novel just aren’t there.  But if you are a writer who wants to write such a thing for the benefit of doing it—you can.  For a guy like me, there are literally millions of ways to make a million dollars.  I don’t need to rely on one way to get there.  I can afford to write millions of words on daily articles and publish books around the gatekeepers which does have an impact on culture in a positive way—and that is how I decided to do what I did.  Sean Hannity in his way did the same thing as did Rush Limbaugh and many others.  Some make a lot of money at it, some not so much—but they do it because they have passion for the subject and they no longer are regulated by a gatekeeper in doing it—and that’s what’s different.  That’s what obviously frustrated Ted Kopple.

In many ways Donald Trump is like the rest of us—he felt he could do the job of president better so he put himself out there starting around 2010 to start that journey. He’s not doing the job to get rich, he’s doing it out of personal passion for the job because many people like myself, Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity have softened up the marketplace to consider new ideas that the old guard held down in the news rooms of Ted Kopple’s world, the movie producers in Hollywood, and the publishers in New York controlled largely by Publisher’s Weekly and The New York Times.  They aren’t running the show anymore and haven’t been for a while.  The big difference is that now in 2017 with Donald Trump in the White House, they can’t hide it anymore.  Now mainstream people are seeing it for the first time and people like Ted Kopple—and virtually every Hollywood producer is angry about it—because all their efforts at keeping a lid on the competition of ideas has failed and their life long quest has proven irrelevant.

So yes, we’ve turned a corner. Even though the focus today is on Republicans botching the health care issue, the progressive left which has controlled everything for so long is losing more ground every day and their complete and utter destruction is imminent. We are only a few months into the Trump presidency and its obvious what’s happening.  Open borders are closing, money is flowing again, the Keystone Pipeline is about to fill with oil, NASA is getting back to work and deregulation is the spirit of the White House daily.  The Supreme Court is about to be satisfied and things are happening that Ted Kopple never imagined could—because he thought things were under control and the “system” was in charge.  So he did his hit piece on Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh and blamed the “fairness doctrine” for why things went wrong.  But the writing on the wall was there long ago and people like me started chipping away at the wall instead of conforming to it—and that is why today is so different from yesterday.  And why tomorrow will be unrecognizable for them.  And I love it!

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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Playstation VR is Simply Fantastic: ‘Rush of Blood’ pushes the market to a new game changing standard that is simply amazing

Even though the topics range often from one extremity to another, the basic theme of this information site is that of culture building—what makes us who we are in the realm of science, politics, art, history, and philosophy.  And these days one of the strongest influences on our culture is the video game industry and I find it infinitely fascinating to watch how innovation and achievement is transforming our society in very positive ways.  For instance, I am very impressed with the Leap Frog tablets which my grandchildren use for pre kindergarten learning.  I think it’s an amazing device that really is a game changer in the field of education.  I’m also very keen to get my hands on a Nintendo Switch which is next on my to-do list in the realm of video gaming.  But for the last six months I have been all about the new Playstation VR which I think is simply amazing.  It far exceeded my expectations upon getting it and now that the smoke has cleared my current favorite game over any of the personal entertainment systems is Until Dawn’s Rush of Blood VR.  What an experience that is and after playing it now since October of 2016 I think it’s time to talk about it in a very macro way—the impact it has on our culture going forward and what it means—because there’s a lot going on with it that I haven’t seen reflected in any review of the game as of yet.  It’s such a new thing that I don’t think anybody quite knows how to articulate the phenomenal impact that is going on with Playstation VR.

It started innocently enough, my wife and I during lunch one day in October just a few days after the official launch of the hot new Playstation VR game system which supplements the PS4 base unit, picked one up because I wanted to play two of the games, the upcoming Battlefront game for Star Wars where you get to fly an X-Wing into battle and this arcade shooter Rush of Blood which was kind of a mix of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom mixed with John Carpenters, The Thing from what I could tell.  Being a guy who likes to shoot guns, I thought this game would be a great way to try shooting in a virtual environment because Playstation has these cool little motion controllers that simulate guns very well.  We spent about $600 getting everything needed which was cheaper than a new gun, so I thought it was a pretty good deal.  I went home and set it all up not really sure what I was going to be experiencing and after playing Rush of Blood the first time my jaw was on the ground.  It was an incredible experience.

I don’t think the game is for everyone, but it does reflect the way I think—so I enjoy it immensely from a conceptual level.  For my readers, it you want to take a journey through my mind, play Rush of Blood levels 5 and 7 and you’ll know.  Watching videos of the events of the game really don’t pay the technology justice.  For instance, as seen on the level 5 video, the giant spider which is the main antagonist specifically designed to exploit the arachnophobia in all of us at a primal level, physically looks like it crawls up and over you.  The closest thing I’ve ever seen to something like this was in Orlando’s Universal Studios at the Spiderman ride.  For me that ride is a benchmark in 3D technology and physical effects because Spiderman physically interacts with you on the ride and it’s very convincing.  I’ve always been amazed by what they’ve done with 3D projections at Universal Studios and look forward to every visit there.  But Kings Island is where I spend most of my time in Cincinnati during the warm months.  I love the place and after hundreds of rides on The Adventure Express, I still like the feel of riding in those wooden roller coasters.  I particularly enjoy the October Haunts that they have at Kings Island where they combine haunted houses with roller coaster riding and if you combine that with the shooting gallery type rides they have at Universal, Kings Island and Disney World you essentially get what you experience with Rush of Blood mixed with the Spiderman ride at Universal Studios.  On that level 5 round the spiders climb into your car with you—the little roller coaster that you ride in during the game—and they are very convincing.  They look a lot better in VR than they do on a 2D YouTube screen.

And that’s what makes Rush of Blood so amazing—I’m comparing it to my experiences at Kings Island, Universal Studios, and Disney World yet the whole thing is available for the home entertainment market.  You literally get to bring an amusement park level experience to you PS4 home game console.  Also, keep in mind that I’m a guy who shoots real guns every day—literally, so the gun work in the game is very good.  The Playstation motion controllers work extremely well, shockingly so.  With all those elements combined, the technical leap that Supermassive Games utilized to make such a thing a reality is simply jaw dropping to me.  The graphics are just superb, the physics of the game amazing, and the sound design is insanely good.  What Playstation VR does that the big amusement parks in Orlando can’t is completely put their guests into an immersive environment.  Playstation VR covers your entire face comfortably, so you forget you are wearing a head set.  Then they have these stereoscopic 360 degree ear phones which provide sound from all around you in pure projection meaning there is no spillover noise the way you might get from a home theater system with surround sound. This is piped perfectly into your ears with great effect so noises behind you, or to your right and left are unnervingly realistic.

It took me several months to really think about this exciting new technology and I have to say that if Uncharted 4 was my favorite video game of 2016 this Rush of Blood is my current favorite for entirely different reasons.  It’s really in a category of its own.  It’s a theme park/haunted house right in your living room because you really do forget that you are on a couch instead of an actual roller coaster on a cold October evening at the Haunts at Kings Island.  And what’s even worse—or better in regard to Rush of Blood is that the monsters do invade your personal space they way real monsters at a haunted house can’t legally do—which is certainly unnerving.  I enjoy the chaos because it actually helps me practice staying calm under extreme pressure—because the monsters in Rush of Blood often get right in your face and the sounds that accompany them can be truly scary.  Your mind doesn’t know the difference between reality and fantasy when your senses are overloaded the way that Playstation VR can do.  The 3D environments are the best I’ve ever seen—there is real length, width, and depth to them instead of the flat planed look you get from most 3D movies.  In Rush of Blood, as well as other Playstation VR titles the graphics are photographically distinct meaning all the little details look the way they would in real life.  The graphics might look a bit cartoony, but it’s the proximity of things that sell it—such as a long corridor holding its depth in relation to our perspective the way it would in real life.  And as you go by rooms the depth of adjacent structures stream away and toward each other the way they do to the naked eye. I can’t imagine the computer calculations it takes to pull off this effect but Playstation VR so far in every title I’ve seen has pulled this off flawlessly, which makes Rush of Blood that much more terrifying because there aren’t little physics problems to give your mind a hint that this is only a game.  You have to consciously remind yourself of it because your subconscious accepts it as a reality which is a tremendous testament to the game designers.

What excites me as an adrenaline junkie—and let me say that is exactly why I love Rush of Blood—it’s not for everyone.  But for me, it is the perfect thing—just my speed.  I manage my stress in life with adrenaline.  I love taking chances and living on the edge—but to manage a productive life I need to get those experiences in ways that don’t wreck cars and destroy people’s lives.  So I go often to Kings Island to ride roller coasters and I get down to Florida to the Orlando parks when I can—and I play video games often.  I mean I’m an adult professional who shoots lots of guns, spends a lot of time with family and reads at least one book a week.  Professionally I work about 70 hours a week but I still have managed to put in about 840 hours into my Playstation 4 this year.  So that gives some indication of how important it is to me.  Rush of Blood lets me live at the highest adrenaline levels very personably—in a completely immersive environment and that lets me act responsibly in other parts of my life without having to give up that nature in myself—for the benefit of mankind.  This PS4 VR system really lets me live out a dangerous life without having to actually go to an amusement park—its literally in my living room now, so it will be interesting to see how other entertainment venues grapple with this new technology.  I am certainly a believer and I think Rush of Blood is the best of the best in regard to pushing the technology forward.  When I’m playing it, I’m convinced I’m there shooting inter-dimensional beings and giant monsters with all the swashbuckling appeal of the mine car chase from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

Playstation was the first to game console market with their VR and it’s difficult to know how they might improve on it because if Rush of Blood is the starting point, where things will be two or three years from now is ungodly exciting.  And for the $600 or so, it was one of the best things I’ve bought in a while just because it feeds my inner adrenaline junkie copious amounts of joy.  The shooting alone is worth the money I’d save in real ammunition if I could ever sit in a real roller coaster and practice shooting from a moving condition at actual targets.  The process of shooting alone is enjoyable in Rush of Blood, let alone all the other elements.  I can only say that it’s a fun time to be alive where options like Rush of Blood for Playstation VR are available for a home market and not some special exhibit at the Epcot Center as a potential technology.  This technology is here and now, and it is just something special that I never thought I’d ever see—let alone to see it available in my living room.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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Donald Trump had a Great Week According to Fountainheads: The news about NASA is much bigger than the health care discussion

I felt bad for Donald Trump on Friday because after all his cheerleading congress still did not have enough votes to repeal Obamacare and start the process on healthcare reform.  I understand completely how negative that whole experience was for him particularly after I read an article from the Huffington Post on Thursday gloating when it was obvious that the Republican votes just weren’t there in spite of all the hard work Trump put into the effort.  I am working on something big right now which Trump has done before in a similar way which costs millions and millions of dollars and a lot of people’s livelihoods and it is really painful to be the only one in the room who has worked hard enough to see what’s over the horizon knowing that you are dragging 50 to 100 people behind you who are nowhere near as talented as you are, or creative–yet you have to work with them on a project kicking and screaming across the finish line because they can’t see the big picture and have no desire to do the work to gain that ability.  Trump has been to this point before, but now when he does these things it’s on a national scale and political enemies are lingering everywhere to point out every negative thing that happens—so to preserve their world view.  Read what this writer by the name of Howard Fineman Global Editorial Director, The Huffington Post said in his article after the health care repeal bill was pulled Thursday night.

WASHINGTON ― If this was The Art of the Deal in action, then Donald Trump needs to write a new book.

In his first, and therefore crucial, foray into presidential negotiating, the prince of New York real estate failed miserably because he was dealing with a world and a way of doing things he never faced when he was buying and building.

In Washington, legislating, and leading the country as president, require more than simply bullying people or buying them off with borrowed cash. As a result, Trump had to postpone a vote Friday on the GOP health care plan he tried to bully through Congress, after it became clear that the legislation could not secure enough votes.

As a harbinger of the future, the situation could not have been more devastating.

“At the end of the day, this isn’t a dictatorship,” Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer, said as the bill was sliding to oblivion. He sounded resigned to the reality of legislating in a democracy. Whether his boss agrees – and learns – is the key question.

Among other things, President Trump has to learn that in Washington, you can’t simply build your own design. You have to build what other people want. Your job is to find consensus and entice others – many others ― into thinking that your vision is theirs. Projects get “built” here more with rewards than threats. It is not a brutal game of “the last man standing.” It’s “we’re all in this together,” even when the “we” is just your own party.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/donald-trump-manhattan-washington_us_58d43610e4b03692bea3e4ea

I’ve heard all that before in my own life and essentially this is the debate in the great American novel, The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand—who makes something go and who should get the credit.  Our entire society is built around this notion of collective “we” making decisions and it just doesn’t work.  Without a leader, people just don’t perform well in the human race and without that one person who works harder than everyone else, who is smarter because they are the ones who stay up all night 7 days a week doing the hard work at the front of the train—all the other people who are needed to “reach consensus” are just ornaments to the process.  At the finish line of a completed project—which is what I’m going through—when the average people can see that what’s going to happen will actually work, that is the point where all the weaklings jump on your coattails and ride your efforts to success.  Trump made most of his forty-year career in real estate under this premise.  Give a guy like Howard Fineman a million dollars the way that Trump’s dad loaned Donald money to get started, and Howard probably would have bought a Florida condo and taken all his friends out to dinner for a decade talking about doing something successful.  And after ten years, he’d be broke again with nothing to show for the money.  It takes a special kind of person to do things—and not everyone is up to the task.

Trump created about three possible trajectories for the future of health care reform so he’s hardly done—but I’m sure his faith in the human race is much less today than it was on Wednesday of last week because negative people like those opposing the house bill under Speaker Ryan just couldn’t see the big picture.  And Ryan screwed up his end too by playing cloak and dagger games in the beginning.  Trump tried to pull all those idiots together, but in the end, they couldn’t see past their own noses—and that’s how it is in most cases.  I spent most of this last week talking about furniture and completely irrelevant details which were easy for normal people to get their mind around only because they could now see that success was just ahead—and everyone suddenly wants on the train which of course slows everything down because a single mind isn’t able to just direct everyone what to do—because all of them learned incorrectly in their various colleges and military backgrounds that it is a collective “we” who make the world move—and that’s just not true. Take away Trump and there’s not even a health care discussion.  Apply his influence, and eventually a bill will get done—this time one shaped by Rand Paul which is more like what Trump wants anyway.  People like Fineman don’t understand those kinds of things, but that’s why he’s a reporter and not a doer.  He’s simply not equipped like a lot of people do make things happen.  Its people like him who have built this “consensus system” which fails to properly identify how things really work not in a theoretical democracy, but in the way human beings actually think.

Even worse is that the news cycle completely missed Trump’s message about pulling off the cuffs on NASA which is something I’ve been talking about for years.  I reported way back in 2011 how terrible it was that NASA had been virtually shut down under Obama and redirected to study Muslim contributions to science.  Space X has helped fill the void, but NASA is the government agency that got the whole thing started and they should be back at it again in Cape Canaveral.  In a lot of ways the news this week about NASA was much bigger than the health care debate because the wealth that will be created by the space agency will go a long way to solving the kinds of problems that actually drive up health care costs.  You need an abundance of something if you want to drive down costs, and right now in health care there are too many people who abuse the system and too few insurance companies willing to play the game because of the risks involved.  And with declining personal incomes in America because jobs like those that typically are conducted at NASA have gone away—people aren’t willing to spend such extraordinary amounts of money on health insurance.  So to fix one people you need the other, and unleashing NASA goes a long way to solving the American jobs problem—and that is truly exciting.

What is sad though is that Trump did a lot of great work last week, but nobody but the “fountainheads” understand it.  Normal people who are the late comers to everything don’t get it—yet they still insist that they are equal in the process of creation through consensus building.   Consensus building is the flaw of all democracies because not everyone is equally equipped.  Some people are lazier or just dumber and they are not willing to put the work in that people like Trump are.  What Fineman calls bullying are what Trump would call “working” and so long as there are people out there who don’t know the difference, nothing will work the way things should.  Stupid people cannot be allowed to hold things up just because they are not willing to do the hard work and seek to hide that behind “consensus building.”  That’s usually why they are stupid, because they keep themselves in that state by refusing to learn all the things needed to accomplish a difficult task.  And it is truly sad to see those types of people celebrating Trump’s struggles even while the very good information about NASA was coming forward even over the health care debate.  Yet nobody paid any attention because they don’t see the value in it.  And that is truly unfortunate.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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A Cincinnatian’s Perspective on the Cameo Night Club Shooting: It is culture not guns that was the real villian

OK, let’s clear up some things right now since the global media—including people in India (I didn’t know they had electricity in India) are pouncing on the shooting in a Cincinnati nightclub where 15 people were shot, and as of this writing one has died.  I live in Cincinnati, so this is my turf and let me just set the record straight—the people attending the Cameo Night Club on Kellogg Avenue by the great Lunkin Airport were not NRA supporters.  The place caters to the hip hop crowd and is known as a “meat market.”  It’s not a bunch of wholesome Midwesterners getting together for a barn raising ceremony.  The place seeks to cater to a youth market—specifically college kids—and the environment is conducive to the gangsta’ culture so prevalent in urban areas where government welfare checks are handed out like candy.  So while covering this story—make it known that it wasn’t the fault of guns—it was the culture of hip hop which breeds negativity among confused youth who are easily provoked into conflict.

The people who attend these clubs are not normal Americans—everyday people who work hard, pay their taxes and try to make the next generation better than when they found it.  These are young people gathered together to listen to violent music racially inspired who take part in a culture of victimization.  Intellectually they are not much different from animals and when dogs start fighting over the same piece of meat—we all know what happens.  You can’t mix angry music with young people not yet intellectually equipped—and sell overpriced drinks to a dance floor converted to a VIP area and not expect there to be violence.  The Cameo Night Club has built its reputation pushing that line and now people crossed it.  That is the real story.  The entire shooting could have been avoided by not putting all those dangerous elements together.  It’s a cultural problem, not one that involves guns.

As the evidence is presented, the story will be watered down when it is shown that the responsibility is more cultural and of the direct responsibility of the club itself than the firearms that were used.  I know that area on the east end well down by Lunkin Airport.  The site called Cameo now used to be Annie’s which was a rock and roll hang out that brought in big name rockers after their 80s hey days were over.  And there were fights there all the time—the same as Never on Sundays in Silverton.  Those crowds were largely white rock n roll types of the heavy metal verity.  That was music for a different generation and yes they were violent places—even back then.  If two guys had their eye on the same girl, fights did break out—often.  Now that Annie’s went out of business someone thought it was a good idea to bring hip hop music out into the east end so this Cameo place took over to essentially let people live out their fantasies developed while playing the video game Grand Theft Auto.  So not only do you have an indicatively violent activity that comes with all places that play angry music—but now you have an entire generation who has played Grand Theft Auto and want to live out that fantasy in real life on weekend nights—which the Cameo club was happy to facilitate.  Now it blew up in their face and people will have to be accountable.  In the hours that come, you will find dear reader that things occurred just as I have described and now that all these media outlets have covered the story hoping to make the gun the big villain everyone will have to backtrack when they realize that the cause was the violent hip hop culture itself and the mixing of very dangerous elements together which caused this tragic situation.

There are consequences to actions and for too long we’ve all allowed ourselves to look away from this growing problem simply because white culture has been blamed for slavery so nobody is allowed to point out the obvious.  If blacks and whites, red people and yellow people and all people in between are going to live in the same country they need to have at least the same values.  But you can’t have a bunch of slum dogs celebrating hip hop gangsta’ culture openly and expect a society to thrive.  There is nothing good about a place like the Cameo Night Club.  That culture is rotten from top to bottom and I would say the same about the nightclub that was there before it in Annie’s.  There was nothing good about those places that perpetuated the benefits for mankind.  They were places to listen to angry music and pick up people for sex under drunken conditions.  Not a good mix.  And that is the problem.  It’s not firearms.

As this story unfolds it’s time to have the real discussion that is the root cause of these violent neighborhoods.  We can’t expect black communities to assimilate with the rest of the American experience when what they think is a fun time is going to places like the Cameo Club and cappin’ the ass of cops.  We already have too many generations of people who come from urban communities that think that way and they are having kids and teaching them the same stuff—and it’s time for it to come to an end.  Instead of wasting their time in the Cameo Night Club those stupid kids should have been home reading A Tale of Two Cities, or something similarly productive.  Things will only change when they change what they put into their minds.  Because what they are doing now just isn’t cutting the bacon.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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Lee Wong’s Red Flags of Communism: Support for an accused traitor in Sherry Chen reveals what’s behind the mask

I only pay attention to Lee Wong because he is a liberal trustee living in my very Republican neighborhood and masks himself with the banter of conservativism to hold his office—like a lot of RINOs do around the country. So this story isn’t just regional because it literally spans the globe in conspiracy and of course Lee Wong is right in the middle of it—because he put himself there.  Sherry Chen was working for the National Weather Service in Wilmington when she flew to communist China to visit some family and friends.  When she returned Chen was arrested for sharing some data with a Chinese associate which was downloaded from her National Weather Service job server.  She claimed a supervisor gave her permission, but the government charged her with four felonies.  Eventually they were dropped probably because the political climate was just too intense and nobody wanted to pay the legal fees.  Never-the-less, she lost her job at the National Weather Service.

Now, if I had been Sherry Chen—thinking the way a Republican thinks—I would have had another job in about five minutes. I wouldn’t want to go back to an employer who treated me badly, especially if I was innocent. In the case of Sherry Chen—who knows.  If she has access to security information, there would have been no reason to share it with people in China for obvious reasons, so she showed bad judgment and as an employer even if she had permission from a supervisor, they all have a right to terminate employees who don’t follow the rules of their business model.  That’s the end of that story.  But what makes this fascinating is that Sherry wants her job back—as if she’s entitled to it, and Lee Wong, the RINO from my West Chester district protested at the federal building last week with about ten other losers from around the country to demand her job back also.  What were those idiots thinking?

“She’s a top scientist, a hard-working scientist,” West Chester Township Trustee Lee Wong said Tuesday to the Cincinnati Enquirer shown at the link below. “It is wrong to make this kind of accusation, unsupported, wrongfully accuse her, and then drop all the cases before the trial with no apologies or explanation. She had done nothing wrong. She is innocent. She’s an American citizen.” Really, Lee? How do you know she was innocent? How do you know she’s a top scientist, relative to what? And how do you know she did nothing wrong? Because she’s a friend of yours? Lee has a history of making bad decisions, and emotional ones at that, but I was surprised that he stuck himself on the front page of this really nothing story. If Sherry Chen is really a top scientist, then she’ll have plenty of other options to pick from—she wouldn’t need the National Weather Service. Instead she and Lee are fighting for a job that terminated her which shows the obvious liberal/communist roots of their thinking—that jobs are entitlements, and not opportunities that must be nurtured.

Several times just this year Lee Wong has talked about his record in the military and his American citizenship as if to explain away any indications regarding his obvious liberalism. The fact that he served 20 years in the military is supposed to supersede any doubt we might have about his patriotic temperament. He played that card during a trustee meeting in West Chester recently when he stirred up labor union protests against the board several months ago—and got caught doing it. He did the same in a protest for Sherry Chen. He stated comments in her defense then as if to shut down any opposition touted his military record as if that were a trump card to debate. Hey, Stanley Manning, or whatever that guy who turned himself into a girl was an active military member too, but he committed espionage quite spectacularly just the same. That doesn’t give one a free pass to be a hippie liberal or even an advocate of espionage just because they served in the military. China is a communist country and contacts they have within the United States are subject to suspicion—its guilt by association. In this age of terrorism and intellectual property theft, we must always be cautious. If Lee were such a patriot, he’d understand that. Instead, he advocates for a way of life that isn’t rooted in American Republicanism, but in communist fairness and equality much more reminiscent to a liberal. Then to proclaim it in such a way is really a ridiculous expense of political capital that shows a really poor grasp of the modern political temperament. Lee’s approach might have gone unnoticed in the last decade, but today it just sounds ignorant.

http://cin.ci/2nkurVM

Lee Wong, Sherry Chen, and all the other protesters down at the federal building rallying to Chen’s case all used racism and altruistic service as the defense against the accusations of espionage leveled against Sherry and that is when you know that the liberals have a weak case. Additionally, their assumption that Sherry’s job at the National Weather Service is an entitlement, not an earned asset further demonstrates the incredible naiveté of their liberal inclinations.  I understand that they are Chinese “Americans” trying to make their way in the world—but as I always say, they need to assimilate to American culture.

They are welcome of course, but they can’t be sharing sensitive data with family members in communist China because in spite of what the politics of the world wants us to think, China and the United States are not on the same page.  One is a capitalist country the other is a communist one—and they don’t get along.  If Sherry liked her job at the National Weather Service, she should have not shared data with anybody in a foreign country—even with supervisor approval.  Both of those idiots should have read the fine print in their employment contracts and not assumed that they could get away with such a thing just because Chen was from China and could use her race as a cover for espionage, even innocently conducted.  But for Lee Wong to even attach himself when he’s trying to fight for his trustee seat is a very reckless decision that defies the mask of Republican Party affiliation that he tries to wear just so he can get elected in a very conservative region.

If Lee lived just a few miles to the south in Hamilton, County, he’d be running as a Democrat. Just because he served for twenty years in the military and is a Chinese American that doesn’t give him a right to call himself whatever he wants.  He is to be judged by his actions—and everything Lee does as a trustee indicates that he is a liberal Democrat most elaborately exhibited by his support of such a controversial character as Sherry Chen.  People might say that supporting his friends while under fire is an act of valor, but in reality, its arrogant—because if she were so innocent and not up to some liberal activism, she would have picked up a job at some university or big commercial firm.  Instead, she is fighting for her government job back and that provides a real window into the antics of these radicals.  Democrats are all about government expansion and safety nets whereas Republicans are about self-reliance and smaller government.  If Lee were a Republican, he wouldn’t put himself out on the front line for Sherry Chen.  He might offer her words of encouragement, or even help her get another job—but he wouldn’t be fighting to add one more government employee to the tax payer payroll after being arrested for treason—and using his military service and accusations of racism to advance his argument.  That is how you can know what a person is really about—not by what they say, but by what they do.  And according to what Lee Wong does—he is such a Democrat that the red flags of communism are literally hanging from his metaphorical forehead.  And that is something that voters in West Chester have a chance to correct very soon—and should.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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