Jimmy Kimmel the big liberal Pussy: How guns are important to American morality

 

Who is this Jimmy Kimmel pussy crying about things in front of his audience of what’s supposed to be a nightly comedy show?  I was so angry about his monologue right after the Las Vegas shooting demanding more gun control legislation that I waited to respond just to keep my volatile thoughts about him in check.   Kimmel is one of those west coast softies who have obviously been coddled through life and had the fortune to be put into a high platform in the entertainment culture—and he feels he has the right to lecture the rest of America about guns going so far to say that “no American should be able to own an M-16,” and he further went on to berate the NRA for supporting efforts to knock back more legislation from panicky politicians screaming for some short-term fix to a long-term problem.  I think I’ve had enough of these east and west coast liberal losers inflicting on my American culture a value system that is as foreign to this country as an alien visiting here from Mars might be.  Guns in America are important and are at the core of our independence—and every bit as important as any other Amendment, especially the First.  Americans should be able to own anything they want, and when bad guys do bad things with guns, more laws won’t do the trick.  The problem is much more complicated than what Jimmy Kimmel the pussy is advocating.

I had an extraordinarily bad week of last where hundreds of people I have been dealing with and millions of dollars in investment were on a razor’s edge of peril and it took every skill I had in the tool box to keep everything on track.  It was a brutal life that could easily crush anybody’s resolve.  But one thing I do to manage all that stress is to balance it out with things I enjoy and to that effect I had a chance to visit with my family the Neiderman Family Farm down the road from my house in Liberty Township.  I shot guns all through the week on my Cowboy Fast Draw target range.

Then on the weekend we visited a family retreat in central Kentucky where I had the opportunity to do some four wheeling and some shooting of the big guns to blow off some steam.   All those places added up to a lot of good sanity maintenance for me—they reminded me what was important as the storm clouds swirled around me professionally and as usual, I had everything sorted out by Monday morning—because of the way I manage my stress.  Guns are a huge part of that personal maintenance.

When I talk about the big guns, I am specifically talking about my favorite gun, my Smith & Wesson .500 Magnum.  I brought the 500 grain cartridges which are getting close to the top load you can fire out of a handgun.  The S&W .500 is the most powerful handgun manufactured in the world.   With the smell of a campfire blowing my way as a spectacular sunset cast it’s gaze upon my shooting position on a hilltop the punishing satisfaction of firing such a massive bullet at a steel plate target from 30 yards away is something specifically American and uniquely manly.  I wasn’t with a bunch of drunken heathens the way Hollywood might paint that picture

I just described, nearby the women were sitting around a campfire eating camp food and talking about domestic concerns.  My niece was there with me shooting a new gun for her concealed carry endeavors.  Her husband was shooting with me also while my brother-in-law was showing me his new collection of guns.  It was very much a family event and everyone was having a good time.  When I fired my big .500 it hit the steel plate so hard that it broke the chain that was hanging the target and we all marveled at the tremendous impact and firepower of the S&W .500.  For me holding that big gun I think about the great engineering that went into making something that powerful so safe.  Aside from the fact that you need to be pretty strong to hold the gun because of the massive recoil, holding that much power in the palm of your hand to me is a miracle of modern industry—and that’s what I think about when using that marvelous gun.

But some idiot like Jimmy Kimmel would never understand what that moment was like, or those methods of personal management.  They’d say that no civilian human being should be able to own such a magnificent weapon.  Why should I be allowed to have something so powerful—according to the same culture that produces monsters like Harvey Weinstein and the Hollywood pedophiles?   Two days earlier at the Niederman Farm where my family attended the Fall Festival it was all about country living, big barns, lots of animals, tractors, and homemade jellies and apple ciders.  On the way to the family retreat down in Kentucky we stopped by Dry Ridge to eat at the Cracker Barrel there and of course the place was packed.  All the people there were similar to the people at the Niederman Farm.

They were Christian people happy with the simple things in life.  Most of them were gun advocates to some degree or another, and of course in the Cracker Barrel are signs and homage’s to the Second Amendment, from antique rifles displayed on the wall to paraphernalia sold in their famous gift shops.  It was one of the best breakfasts I’ve had in a while, and after such a rough week it really calmed me down.  But honestly it was the environment and the people who did it—it was the southern hospitality that people like Jimmy Kimmel make fun of as vigorously as the they do the gun culture that emerges from it.  Let’s face it; the NRA doesn’t have many impassioned members in Los Angeles.  But at the Cracker Barrel in Dry Ridge, Kentucky I could have stood on a table and read from the latest American Rifleman magazine and the customers would have been enthusiastically supportive.

Did I need to own and fire such a huge weapon which was right there with me while I was at the Cracker Barrel, because we were on our way down to the family retreat?  According to Jimmy Kimmel and the cast of Saturday Night Live I didn’t.  In their west and east coast viewpoints it is more moral to piss in the alley of a bar at 3 AM in New York City and to have sex with strange women which are part of their culture than to go shooting with close family members in the middle of God’s country in the American south.  I could easily look at Jimmy Kimmel’s personal life and pick it to pieces.  I’m sure I could declare a lot of things he likes to do illegal and destructive to a good American life.  At any time I could use that big gun to cause all kinds of damage, but it never crossed my mind because in having such a huge weapon it requires responsibility.  Once you act responsibly with a firearm people find that they act responsibly with other things in their lives as well.   That’s the way you find most people who are huge NRA supporters and concealed carry permit holders—they are some of the nicest people there are in the world—and they are honest.  Owning guns tends to bring out the best in people because the foundation of owning firearms is in responsibility.  Once people accept responsibility for something like a gun, they find they can apply the same values to other things and it makes them vastly better people as a result.

The problems that caused that liberal loser in Vegas to shoot up all those people are more systemic than in the right to own firearms.  Kimmel completely missed the point of the Second Amendment and it was painful to listen to him articulate all the stupid Hollywood dinner party talking points without knowing the reality of what the gun culture is.  I would argue that liberalism is the cause of such breakdowns, and that if we really wanted to solve the problems in our society—then we’d make liberalism illegal, not the physical firearms.  I shoot a lot and I love my guns—they are very therapeutic to me.   I like owning large, powerful weapons because they exercise a level of control that makes people better because of that responsibility.   I know and deal with people all over the world and I can report honestly that there isn’t anywhere quite like a gun range or a Cracker Barrel.  It’s not just I grew up with these ideas around me from my home in Liberty Township to the many times I’ve been shooting with family members.  I routinely deal with people of Hindu faith, people who are devote Buddhists—many people from every corner of the globe and I get along well with all of them.  But what’s missing from their various cultures is the kind of independence and positive American spirit that you find in places like that Dry Ridge Cracker Barrel.

The Niederman Family Farm is an expensive ticket, but it is in Liberty Township where most of the homes these days are well over a quarter million dollars.  It’s not uncommon anymore for a home in my neck of the woods to be close to a million dollars—and for the people who move to Liberty Township they want the best of both worlds.  They want access to the great industry that is common to the area in very capitalist friendly political zones, and they like being able to take their families to the Niederman Farm on holidays.  With the money they make at the Niederman Farm they pay their taxes and they improve the property every year so everyone wins.  As I ate a hot dog there during a setting sun with my grandchildren and sipped on drink I thought of Jimmy Kimmel and realized that he was a lost guy who was stuck in a bubble of Hollywood culture that didn’t like people who eat at the Cracker Barrel.  They didn’t like NRA members because guns are beyond their experience.  They are big government socialists who want to mold the world into the image of the rest of the world, which is in a lot of trouble.  I would rather eat at the Cracker Barrel in Dry Ridge or shoot my big .500 Magnum against a setting sun with the smell of wood smoke fresh from a raging camp fire than to eat noodles in Tokyo or sip wine in Venice.  That is what these gun grabbing cry babies are really scared of.  It’s not the guns, but the attitude and independence of the people who use guns to maintain a philosophy that is rooted in individualism instead of collectivism.  Jimmy Kimmel is a pussy because the weight and sorrow of the collective tragedy of Las Vegas was just too much for him.  He had no mechanisms of intellect to deal with his feelings of despair that he felt in realizing that the institution of Americanism couldn’t keep people from harm—and he wants even more laws to support his false belief in the merits of institutionalism.  But for me, and many people who carry and use guns a lot, especially big guns—it is in the focus on personal responsibility in having such things that make us hold the door open for ladies at the Dry Ridge Cracker Barrel while everyone waits in line to just be seated—and they are happy to do it, because they are generally happy people treating their fellow Americans with reverence and respect.  What drives liberals’ crazy is that the respect starts with gun ownership and is the backbone of a civil society—and that is why they cry like a bunch of dwindling pussies on a quest for their own destruction every chance they get, which is why liberalism should be illegal well before guns ever are.

Oh, and remember when I said I practiced Cowboy Fast Draw in my private range?  Well, this is what it looks like.  To me it’s like practicing a golf swing–it’s a sport–a way to test yourself against the forces of nature.  And its pretty cool and a lot better than anything liberals like Jimmy Kimmel do for fun.

Rich Hoffman

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

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