Fire Every “Red for Ed” Protesting Teacher: Public Education sucks, why pay teachers for a crappy–anti American, job

Every single teacher participating in the “Red for Ed” walkouts across Arizona, Oklahoma, and Kentucky—and anywhere else for that matter, should be fired for their radical behavior and recklessness in not doing what they are paid to do in their communities. In spite of what they will tell you their slogan means—the designation of red is a communist sentiment left over from the origins of the labor unions behind this radicalism and is the root cause of their demands for “worker’s rights.” Those rights they are talking about demanding excessively high wages and pension benefits for providing a service that has been very destructive to the education of all Americans is just ridiculous and in need of major reform. The best thing we could do for ourselves as a society is fire every teacher participating in these radical protests and replace them with one of the new automated information devices that are being produced by Google, and Amazon. I am quite serious when I say that Alexia could replace 95% of what teachers in front of a classroom provide and they don’t cost anywhere near the kind of money that an actual employee does. So fire every single one of the teachers and replace them with something much better, an Alexia. Those mechanical devices never strike, they don’t have sick days, and they don’t smell like coffee and bad perfume. Kids will learn a lot more from Alexia than they ever would some fat assed socialist teacher demanding a higher pension and pay for doing what a machine could do much better.

I would dare say that there is nobody reading this who enjoys education as much as I do. I love education so much that I hate the teachers of our modern education system because they teach people all the wrong things. Most adults functioning today are crippled from their youthful educations and their children are even more so. The situation has become increasingly worse each decade essentially starting in the 1930s when communism from FDR’s administration was seeping into the curriculum of public education. It took 30 years for that first communist wave to hit our population which unleashed the problems of the 1960s. Then 30 years after that the “no child left behind” efforts at not raising kids up, but by pulling the smart ones down to the level of the mob—up to the present. The protesting teachers are part of a very destructive process of a public education system designed by big government lovers not to unleash the power of individual thought, but to cripple minds to remain in a nicely manageable herd—easy to slaughter by those who seek to rule over others in society. Public education has been a very destructive endeavor in American society. The evidence of its crippling effects is everywhere. To see it best go to a gambling casino in Las Vegas or a Golden Coral smorgasbord.

There are plenty of opportunities to learn and that has been the bright spot in a capitalist society. There are alternatives to public education for which to learn much more effectively. Over this past weekend I was very delighted to go to The Children’s Museum in Indianapolis, Indiana and talk to some paleontologists there who were working on a T-Rex bone fresh from the Bad Lands. The lab where they worked was open to the public and you could reach in and touch the actual bone they were working on. I asked them why they allowed the oily fingers of people to actually interact with the raw bone of such a rare creature and they explained to me that at The Children’s Museum their policy is to let people interact with their exhibits—because that’s how people learn. That made me very happy to hear. Ecstatic actually, I love talking to people who are passionate about learning and discovering new things. The employees at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis were passionate about learning and were to my mind the model of what education should all be about. I don’t like public education for the same reason that I’m not a fan of public parks, public restrooms, and public libraries—there is a value that is lacking in anything that doesn’t have private ownership as part of the institution. When any of the employees use collective bargaining as their means of acquiring compensation there simply is no way to properly balance a budget without driving the cost of the endeavor beyond the scope of the project. For instance, the two ladies who were working as paleontologists at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum I watched all day, from the start of their shift to the end. I spoke to them several times and they were as interested in their job at the end of the day as they were at the beginning. If I were running things I’d pay them six figures to keep doing what they were doing with the expertise that they displayed. But for a teacher who just shows up and complains about taking work home each night, doesn’t want to work weekends, doesn’t want to work more than 7 hours a day—I’d rather replace a live teacher with something like Alexia.

I was thinking about all these problems as we drove back from the Children’s Museum back to Cincinnati, Ohio. I used Google Maps on my iPhone to locate a Cracker Barrel outside of town, far enough away to thin out the rush hour traffic. As I plugged in my phone to my car my music played seamlessly while giving me directions to the highway street by street working far better than any atlas I ever owned. I was slow to accept Google Maps because I’ve always been naturally good at directions and reading maps, but I have to admit that Google Maps is far better than the atlas book I used to keep under my car seat. While I was driving people called me and the navigation system, the music, and the people I was talking to all seamlessly worked through my car’s speaker system and I was able to interact with everything without taking my hands off the wheel. That is a lot better than how things used to be, and education is no different. There are many better ways to educate people than the old system of a dominating authority figure in the front of the room designed to press students into a peer group—a concept invented to spread communism into American society during the 1930s under president FDR and his New “communist” Deal. That old way of education has crippled so many people intellectually, why would we continue to throw so much money at it? What are all these teachers thinking who are protesting now for higher pay and pension security? We aren’t living in that world any more just like nobody uses an atlas to navigate while traveling. It’s archaic to even think about it. Education has even more potential for reform than navigation and the only reason we haven’t yet gone there as a society is because these labor unions scare people into taking away their baby-sitting services. Because that’s all that’s happening in public schools, parents get to drop off their kids as a babysitter paid for by the state. In exchange the “state” gets to try to program children into the ways of big government communism, thus the “Red for Ed” campaign.

Most people don’t really want communism as the means to a social philosophy, even though that’s what they’ve learned in public school. I’d say that the quality of public education has been garbage rooted in Marxism that has been proven to be crippling to the human race and should be abandoned knowing what we do today about the nature of that social philosophy. But this article is about cost. Why should we pay so much money for something that produces such bad results as public education does? People obviously aren’t very smart coming from the public education experience. Observing the poor conditions that most adults live in intellectually, public education could be said to be as destructive as smoking, or alcoholism, crippling the mind of the participants to the point of uselessness. At this point anything would be better, and I actually think people would learn better with Alexia, or some other similar device. That means that every protesting teacher in Arizona, West Virginia, Kentucky, Oklahoma and everywhere else could be, and should be fired for any form of collective bargaining protest. Their education methods are not good. Their service to the community is old and outdated. And their epistemological foundation for the passion for learning is missing leaving their students crippled for their entire lives thereafter. So why should we spend all this money on public education? The answer is, we shouldn’t.

I’m willing to spend a lot of education. In my life I can say that my family has spent a small fortune on education, not institutional education, but the essence of education which is discovery and emotional exploration of personal intellect. I value speaking to other people who are very passionate about education as well, such as the two employees I mentioned from the Indianapolis Children’s Museum whom I promise conduct their work and never think about the money. They do a good job in their fields of endeavor regardless of how much money they get paid and that’s what I expect in a teacher. Compensation is for management to sort out in a capitalist country. If someone is valued a good manager will find a way to pay employees what they are worth. Bad employees are a dime a dozen and get a lot less money—and that’s how it should be. This collective bargaining nonsense is as useless today as an atlas under the car seat. It’s not good for the teaching profession and it’s not good for the recipients of the education. It makes the bad equal to the good and that is just stupid—and it shows. I don’t want to pay a fortune to teachers who complain about their work day, who complain about their work they have to do at home, or about the amount of kids they have to teach in a classroom. I want teachers who love to teach whether the room is filled with 26 students or 2000. I want teachers who are into the job 24 hours a day, seven days a week, all year-long. And I want teachers who spend their spare time reading and getting better, not sitting around watching sitcoms while making their assess even fatter with potato chips and nachos bitching about their bratty students to their friends on Facebook when the school day is done. Those types of people aren’t worth the money we spend on them. Alexia could do a much, much better job, and kids would learn more in the process.

Rich Hoffman

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overmanwarrior

I write, and write, and write. And when I'm not writing, I'm thinking about writing. I have too many hobbies. I read too many books and I don't sleep. There's just too much life to be lived to waste it for even a second.

6 thoughts on “Fire Every “Red for Ed” Protesting Teacher: Public Education sucks, why pay teachers for a crappy–anti American, job”

  1. They are comparing their starting salary as a part time employs to a full time engineer, Doctor, architect etc. Most professions do not pay overtime. Walter E. Williams says that those going into education have the lowest ACT scores. Many teacher’s union contracts are for a 180 day year with sick days, personal days, emergency family days etc. etc. Add o his sweetheart contract all of the weather related paid days off. Yet, they still complain. Most college grads can verify that their friends in the schools of education have the easiest classes on campus. Many party nightly while those in other fields have to burn the midnight oil every night. Check out the appearance of most teachers. I have not seen many that look professional. They must not have a dress code. You get the respect that you deserve.

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  2. We have thrown enough money at the problem. The solution is not paying part time employees a full time wage. It is changing the system. Remove all administrators and start from scratch

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  3. Very well put, you ask any teacher why they chose teaching and they will tell you “it’s my love for children”, my ass! Every single teacher that walked out left their students hanging, some role models!

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  4. Education and learning are more than just something for which the states cut budgets. Education. Our schools are all part of our national identity, indeed, our national security. As a nation, we need to support our schools. We need to pay teachers more money for what they already do.

    Buy this one to show your support for the public schools, community colleges, and universities whenever you need to demonstrate “Red For Ed.” #RedForEd!

    $upport Our Schools America!

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