How Alex Jones and David Icke Contribute to a First-Rate Mind: Just because things are considered conspiracies, doesn’t mean they are false

When critics of mine say that you can’t listen to my topics on politics or other serious matters because I also cover topics of conspiracy and pseudoscience, they are speaking of their own limitations, not the actual way that information is obtained. And to that aspect I do find that people like Alex Jones and England’s David Icke contribute to the advancement of understanding by simply asking outlandish questions then seeking evidence to support it. What critics are saying about themselves when they insist that only certain types of information are relevant to any discussion, such as those endorsed by institutional behavior, but not information accepted by institutional understanding they are actually pointing out how misunderstandings are perpetuated in civilization. My method of obtaining truth to anything is to take in information wherever it comes from then using deductive reasoning to chip away at the truth. It’s what I consider a first-rate mind who can take all the puzzle pieces wherever they come from and assemble them into the facts we must all work with. It’s a method I use professionally which is far superior to my peers in industry. When I’m trying to solve a problem, I don’t just look at the accepted institutional evidence because honestly, if someone wants to hide something, the way to do it is to hide it behind institutional trust. And this is becoming increasingly difficult to hide from people these days because information has become so decentralized, and that is why conspiracy theorists such as Alex Jones and David Icke are so popular today. They ask lots of outlandish questions and make proposals that sound crazy to the typical institutionalists. But if taken as just part of a pile of evidence, there are useful concepts introduced that advance thought, which is why I never disregard anything until truth proves something false.

I’m a big believer of brainstorming and I can say from firsthand experience that my methods really piss people off. Such as in business, if I am trying to solve a really complicated problem I invite everyone I can think of to a 15 to 30-minute meeting, from the highest in a company to what might be considered the lowest according to an organizational chart. I ignore the organizational chart because my goal is not to appease the people who are high up on the chart, but to get to the truth, so I bring in everyone, treat them with equal respect and pick their brains and see what they can throw up on one of my “white board meetings,” where anything and everything is considered. I often get a mess of crazy ideas but mixed into them all is some grain of the truth that if you sift through it leads to the answer you are seeking. I look at it like mining for gold. Gold never comes out looking wonderful, you have to dig for it and clean it up before its ready to use. And that is my method for obtaining obscure answers to complicated problems. It is the method of the way any first-rate mind would proceed, and I can say that over the years the people who most hate it are those who are high up on an organizational chart, because they either want to believe that the common people under them are stupid, or that they (as higher ups) have something to hide that they want to keep concealed from the people lower on the organizational chart. And that is exactly what is going on within our own Federal government presently, and why Donald Trump is so hated, because he has a similar method of obtaining information. Its quite a common thing among successful business people to have a decentralized flow of information flowing to them as an executive. Even the guy who pushes brooms all day long has valuable things to say about their observations, so nothing should be left off the table.

When David Icke puts forth that a reptilian race is controlling a few families on planet earth and is trying to flow all politics through them there is some interesting things to sift through. Humans certainly do behave in a strangely maniacal way toward ritual and superstition. Even so-called wise people do believe that spiritual aide can help them overcome earthly challenges over their rivals so that belief comes from somewhere. Until we know where, we have to consider the possibilities. Is it an alien group of reptile people? Who knows. What matters is that some people believe them to be a factor so we have to consider the who, what, why, when and where as to how. Are the villains actually reptilian people? I say it doesn’t matter, but what does is the propensity of some to cleave to a social elite status that then interrupts proper management of our civilization. And of that observation, David Icke has done some fantastic work—it doesn’t matter if its aliens or a bunch of people who went to Yale and wish to protect that institutions reputation with skewed social data. The impact on the world is the same.

When I started years ago my public education crusade my assertion was that public schools were focused on one primary thing, brainwashing children into liberalism and they gained permission from the parents by offering free babysitting services making it all too easy for the programing to take effect. When I said such a thing, critics called it a tin hatted conspiracy on the level of David Icke or Alex Jones. But reality has shown me to be completely correct and it doesn’t sound so crazy these days, because the evidence has been quite apparent. The reason is that information has been decentralized and the state no longer can suppress the data from voters. For instance, my home district of Lakota schools has thrown many millions of dollars of payroll at teachers yet the performance of the students has gone down instead of up. Paying teachers more money has never been a direct contributor to the quality of the public-school system because the schools were never really about education. Past the fifth grade the emphasis of public education has been to fit children into some social demographic and process them into institutional controls, so test scores are not reflective of the reality because the goal was always assimilation, not education. When I said it, it scared people, but these days more people are ready to admit the mess that public education has become. Even though people didn’t want to admit it, when I said the things I did about public education the institutionalists wanted to believe it was all a conspiracy theory, but as it turned out, I was more than correct, even in the early days of speculation.

The controversy of Alex Jones going to Washington D.C. and all the trouble he brought with him is just another example. I thought Alex Jones was baiting Marco Rubio with the whole hand on the shoulder thing. There wasn’t much that Rubio could do to fight a guy like Jones, there was no way to win without being willing to slug it out with Jones. That is why Alex Jones has been taken down from all social media platforms, because the belief is from the institutionalists, for which Marco Rubio is certainly one of them, is that they make the world. Jones was a reminder that there were forces shaping the present world that were outside of those institutional limits, and that’s why Rubio went to the default defense of trying to pretend he didn’t know who Alex Jones was. It was Rubio’s way of saying that if the institutions don’t recognize you, that you have nothing the world wants; therefore, I don’t know you. But when Alex Jones called Rubio a bathhouse frat boy, there was an accuracy to that statement that cuts across all party politics, and ultimately points to the reason that Marco lost the primary election to Trump.

Information, wherever it comes from is not dirty or even crazy. I have found that even the most disjointed mind sometimes produces great intelligence even if the reality of possessing that knowledge does make them a little eccentric and off the wall. It takes a first-rate mind to take all that information in and to put it to good use, and those that can are wonderful problem solvers. Those who are afraid of that truth call information they don’t like conspiracies, as if to marginalizing it out of usefulness. But the evidence says that you can never give institutional knowledge a monopoly on results. Even if the information comes from someone who believes that a reptile species is controlling us all, or that ancient aliens once settled the planet, or that the Illuminati is asking for blood sacrifices in modern politics to skew election results in their favor, there are aspects in truth to everything, even the most outlandish story. But it takes a good mind to extract that value. And just because a majority of people do not possess such skills does not make the usefulness of those skills less valid. Only more so.

Rich Hoffman

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