“Operation Varsity Blues” is only the tip of the Iceberg

I think personally it’s a crime to be born a human being and not to develop your mind to the furthest extent that you can. And the concept of college was intended to do that. But I have never felt that the college experience was productive or even fruitful in what it was supposed to do. I would generously call the entire education system across the world to be a gross example of mismanagement. I work with highly educated people every day, but one thing that they all have in common who I would consider good is that their educations were not limited to the classroom, but were part of their daily life and continued far after they graduated. The college experience might have obtained for them a job higher up the ladder than people without the college degree but the will to education was a lifelong experience, not something that was purchased then kept for the rest of their lives. And that is the problem at the heart of this massive college scandal titled “Operation Varsity Blues” where the ring leader William Singer led the way in bribing colleges in various ways to get their kids into elite schools. Mindless actresses and other members of the Hollywood community, such as Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were openly cheating the system to get their ungrateful children into schools just for the ability of having talking points to discuss in their social circles. Obviously, nobody cared about actually getting an education, they just wanted the title of an elite school next to their child’s name. And that attitude is really at the heart of the problem, for the schools and the idiots who pay so much money to send their kids there. I would say that the entire college experience is a scam these days, a worthless journey into liberal instruction that does far more damage to a young mind than it does for good and I base that on personal observation and experience.

I have never been a fan of the college experience. I lived on the campus of the University of Cincinnati for several years and had several friends who were in the fraternities and were able to see what those experiences were really about up close. I went to college because everyone told me I had to in order to get a good job, and I challenged that all the way entering each class with a mind toward how stupid the whole set-up was. So to say the least, I thought the entire college experience was dumb, and slow. I couldn’t wait to get as far away from it as possible. The entire system relied on neurotic parents who have failed their children all through their childhoods to believe that by sending their kids to college with extraordinary entrance fees and tuition that they can buy their way into the category of good parenting and in general our social system has supported that false belief. Most often the kids going to college only do so to get away from their parents and to have the experience of partying. And the parents really just want to brag to their peers about what a good parent they were because they spent hundreds of thousands of dollars sending their children to a school with a great reputation.

I had the occasion not so long ago to attend an alum experience at the University of Cincinnati involving the Bearcat basketball team and I was not impressed. It largely consisted of older people reflecting on their youth as they attended the university and their sentiments were etched into time as loyalty to the institution of the college, not what they learned while attending. Any successful person will declare honestly that it takes a lot more work than just a college education to do well in life. All the college experience was doing for people was establishing themselves in a pecking order artificially created by below the line people to tell the world they were paying money to be above the line, a kind of fake it until you make it mentality. I saw the entire alum experience to be no different from the kind of people who attend science fiction conventions and spend all their time playing board games. The experience itself was meaningless, it was the social aspect of it that gave meaning to the participants who largely lacked personal courage needing the approval of others to function.

And that is at the core of this massive college scandal. I would not be surprised to find that all this is only the tip of the iceberg, that many more such scandals are happening every day. Public schools cheat all the time to get their test scores up for their students because federal money is tied to those performance standards—and the unions must have their money. So it shouldn’t be a surprise to nobody that the same cheating culture finds its way into the college world. Everyone is literally in on the game so most of our society is guilty of playing. Lori Loughlin was a terrible, but very typical parent. You can tell in her kids who are destined as a result of that parenting to be losers all their life. All Lori cared about was being able to tell her friends in social circles that her children were going to the best schools. She couldn’t care less what her kids learned there, or even if they would be successful as a result, Loughlin only cared that people believed she cared, and she would have spent any amount of money she had in the world to prove it—just as most parents do.

It’s the same old belief that people have about raising children, they waste their kid’s lives through the first 18 years believing that this school or another, public, private, or college will do great things for their children and that money will do the work they should have been doing as parents. And that never turns out to be the case. If you suck as a parent your kids will suck as adults. End of story. No school can do the job of parenting and that is the real crime of this story. It was the belief that money could buy a title with a school’s name next to that and success in life for a child would occur magically and without effort. That’s how stupid most people are about the college experience and the schools themselves are more than happy to run the scam front and to take the money. In most cases they are only the new breed of snake oil salesmen selling the belief in good health but nothing of any real content.

When I told some of my recent overman stories about how to view life correctly and with authenticity, I had a terrible time with family members and peers when my own children became college aged. I was worried that college would ruin them, and did not encourage them to go even though it put me at odds with most everyone I cared about at the time. I see colleges as dangerous to intellectual development and they certainly aren’t committed to education. In the condition they are in now, they are just a massive scam that needs to be exposed. The problem goes far beyond Operation Varsity Blues, its at the core of our entire culture and the time is here to reevaluate that relationship. You can’t cheat the world with money or fake commitment. You have to be above the line in even your most intimate thoughts and if you really want success, you have to be an authentic personality. Public acceptances get you nothing but an invite to a neighborhood block party and a lot of wasted time talking to people who aren’t worth the air that comes from their mouths while conversing. And that is the lesson we should all learn from this latest, but not the last college scandal.

Rich Hoffman

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