No Outrage Toward College Sports Sexual Abuse: Yet Ambassador Yovanovitch feels threatened, Roger Stone was convicted and the NFL suspends the great Miles Garrett–explaining it all to you

Without question there is a lot going on, however people’s interpretation on it depends on how much they have been broken, like some horse due to their exposure to institutionalism. As an example, and you can see this in most any office environment where people proudly display their continued loyalty to the college they graduated from, and will put on their garments ahead of a big weekend football game with genuine excitement. In my part of the country it is common to see such references to many colleges, especially Purdue and Ohio State, whereas in the North East its Harvard, Princeton, MIT and other such listings. Yet when bad news comes out that the sports doctor for Ohio State had been molesting athletes for decades and people knew about it, nobody knew what to say. The same quandary occurred and still lingers over the Penn State sports program due to the massive amount of homosexual molestation that was going on in their sports program. And in so many ways the events of Friday November 15th 2019 were so earth shattering that the institutionalists who are so trained to think only in that fashion were completely lost.

I am of course referring to the impeachment trial of President Trump as given by Ambassador Yovanovitch, the guilty conviction against Roger Stone, the president’s first campaign manager and behind the scenes confidant, and the massive fight that took place between the Pittsburg Steelers and the Cleveland Browns where the Browns player, Myles Garrett ripped the helmet off the Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph. The world watched in horror as if the entire event came straight out of Westworld where the robots revealed that they were aggressive and potentially dangerous. The trial and conviction of Roger Stone is that institutional way to pretend that all is safe, that the parameters of danger could be controlled by the processes put in place by the institutions and these occasional outbreaks of violence and rebellion, such as the election of President Trump, the fights that happen between NFL players on and off the field could be controlled. And when the evidence is so overwhelming in just how evil the institutions truly are, such as the sexual molestations of student athletes in college sports programs there are no thought processes to prepare them for that reality, so they just ignore the information and stare at their college swag, their coffee mugs dedicated to Ohio State, their photos of a Saturday game and pretend that all is well.

I didn’t see anything wrong with what Myles Garrett did. What does anybody expect? With the level of trash talking that goes on and the expectations to win, tempers are bound to flare up. I’m sure Myles and Rudolph will be friends again. In fact, if the event didn’t happen on television in front of millions of people, they likely would have gone to dinner together an hour later and made up. They are guys, and that’s how guys are with each other. But this window into a primal world for which the NFL has placed itself where safety and good social conduct are supposed to take place over a priority on winning, the fans are noticeably not happy with that direction of the business model. Even though these kids playing football all come from these institutional colleges and were the best that came from those sports programs even knowing all the bad things that go on behind the scenes, fans in the stands are never supposed to see the inmates rebel with such examples of blood letting as was seen in that Pittsburg/Cleveland game. I have seen fights like that in the stands of a Pittsburg/Bengal game between the fans. Football is a violent game and fans love it. Why the NFL or anybody else is so outraged is a bit of a mystery, unless you understand the dysfunction of institutionalism itself.

Such a dysfunctional understanding about the way the world works was obvious during Ambassador Yovanovitch’s testimony against her experience with President Trump. Here was a career bureaucrat that had been released of her duty by Trump for being an Obama era holdover that he didn’t want in the position and the crux of the entire questioning revolved on the termination of government employees from one administration to another. Most people in the position of the President have been broken into thinking that the system is greater than their opinions so that they don’t go and try to change that system. Trump has shown that he doesn’t need any of them to help him make a decision which is just reprehensible to the institutionalist. They are aghast about the entire process and the lack of respect that Trump and his supporters have shown for their value. They are so upset about it that they have been attacking anybody close to Trump, such as Roger Stone as a warning. Stone’s conviction isn’t about doing anything wrong, its about being close to the President and daring to work against the established system of institutional control.

The behavior traces back to any average public education high school environment where peer pressure is used to control all participants so long as the objective is agreed upon by the institutional rules and regulations. For example, molesting children, labor union activism, and transgender bathrooms are outside the scope of institutional instruction as progressive society is establishing those issues as part of their greater agenda of destroying the American family, or families in general so that borders between homes are lowered and the parental aims of government can then replace such sentiments of tradition. However, if an individual wears the wrong shirt to school or shows anger toward some established norm, like gun possession, the enjoyment of a non-establishment form of music, or does not like the local college sports team, then the institution supports violence of any kind to apply peer pressure toward those individuals. They will either be destroyed or converted, but they are not allowed to have their own thoughts for things. Even the most robust anarchist plays their part in the process, they are used most by the institutional to drive peer pressure, they are supported as the threat of enforcement from being socially castigated. They are used in the same way that the government used ISIS and terrorism in general, to say, “see, you need our protection from those bandits, (that we helped to create) join us, or die.” And that is what the institutional told Trump, “follow us or we will put all your friends and even you out on the street. We control the courts, we control the rules and regulations, and we ultimately control you, not some measly election by a bunch of NFL lovers who would rather see a fight than a good old handshake at the end of a game between rivals.

Rather than be upset about it though, it is fascinating to watch and I’m intrigued to watch this social monstrosity, known as intuitionalism die this death of the ages. These are not new thoughts, they’ve have been around since the city states of Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley and the long history of ancient Egypt. But America was born with all the nationalities of the world to rise against that trend, not to preserve it. And that is beyond the scope of their learning, the “institutionalists.” They are process driven due to their natural timidity exacerbated by their life-long journey toward institutional instruction and in this modern age of rebellion, by people not so broken that they know enough to vote for President Trump, the impact of that resolution is far beyond them. They only know that they should punish Myles Garrett and throw Roger Stone in jail and hope that institutional controls will outlast this rebellion as it has for many, many centuries. But I don’t think so. Rather what I think is that I am going to go out and buy myself a Myles Garrett jersey. Because after that game the other night, I think I am more of a fan of the Cleveland Browns as a result.

Rich Hoffman

2 thoughts on “No Outrage Toward College Sports Sexual Abuse: Yet Ambassador Yovanovitch feels threatened, Roger Stone was convicted and the NFL suspends the great Miles Garrett–explaining it all to you

  1. Hi Rich

    My name is Jennifer Gross. I met you a year or so ago a a school board meeting and helped a few years ago when we fought the school levy. I’m running for the Ohio House of Representatives. Would love to meet with you about my candidacy and earn your vote and support.
    Attached is my first mailer. I look forward to seeing you again.

    Respectfully,

    Jennifer Gross
    Candidate for the Ohio House of Representatives
    District 52

    Cell 513 378 5668

    Like

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