What’s Behind the Derek Chauvin Case: We know the façade, yet that is only the beginning

Like a lot of news outlets, I have been asked many hundreds of times over the last few days what I thought of the Derek Chauvin case.  Much to my surprise, very few commentators understood the essence; Tucker Carlson and Candace Owens were pecking around on the surface of understanding, comprehending that it was a fear of the mob behind the verdict. Still, the situation is much more profound and is elusive to the usual analysis.  So, I offer my thoughts on the matter in the video above.  I understood what the judge was doing and can sympathize when he addressed the defense team about Maxine Watters activism that set the stage for an appeal.  She was wrong to fly to Minneapolis to stir up trouble within the black community, attempting to create a mob of extortion to use the crises to establish much broader political power grabs.  And her actions will likely destroy the entire case.  The judge just wanted to get his courtroom off the front page and protect the jurors any way within his power, which was noble.  What else could he do with a mob outside his window?  Without a doubt, the jurors were feeling the same thing.  Not one of them would dare utter a not-guilty verdict for fear of what the mob would do.  But Maxine gave the judge a way out, and he took it with his very unusual speech to the defense, signaling to them what their next steps after a guilty verdict should be. 

What we witnessed this week with the media urging on the mobs of insurrection was truly disgusting.  It was the same unified voice as we saw over election fraud, where there was no evidence, even though nobody wanted to look at it spread out for all to see.  The media refused to acknowledge it and continued to drive a narrative that told the political story they wanted.  An insurrection of President Trump and the America First populist movement to install a progressive dictator operating behind the puppet presidency of Joe Biden and hiding their massive crimes behind vote tampering and media compliance.  After the Chauvin verdict, the media lined up in the same way, sending out pictures of the former police officer in handcuffs, being checked in to the jail—being processed as a criminal.  It was symbolic of what progressives want to do to all police in America.  They want to destroy law enforcement so that they can rebuild our society with a socialist mob and destroy our Constitution in the ashes of that activism.  For them, Chauvin was a victory for them no matter what the innocence might be contemplated.  The mob drove the verdict, and it showed them once again that being a bully works and is how you get power these days.  Republicans won’t stand up to the bullies, and this only confirmed it further for them. 

But what are we supposed to think about the criminal act itself?  As I said in the video, I see it as an unfortunate circumstance of two pairs of opposites.  Chauvin was an aggressive, power-hungry police officer who collided with the tapestry of progressive below-the-line thinking, the drug addict George Floyd and a well-known criminal past.  Progressives sought to exploit the tragedy in similar ways to bring communism to Russia, China, and Cuba.  South Africa comes to mind too.  People forget that Nelson Mandela was a raving communist, and that is the same effort behind Black Lives Matters and all the mobs protesting police brutality.  They make race the issue when it’s much more complicated than that.  But the death itself was just an unfortunate accident between two people who knew each other from their days of working at a nightclub together and bouncing around with wild women and drugs each night at that establishment.  Chauvin married a woman who would soon be a beauty queen, so his life took a different turn but obviously, the past between these two people played out on the day of that death of Floyd.  Floyd being drugged out, and Chauvin showing off to his peers how to subdue a suspect. 

The marriage of Chauvin is another sad story.  His wife from Laos, who could barely speak English, was late in life when she beat out her rivals for the crown.  Good for her for taking a shot and putting herself out there.  But everyone saw what was going on, here was an aging minority woman in a politically correct world of beauty pageants.  They had to give her the crown, but it was enough for the shallow Chauvin.  It was bragging rights when he asked her on a date while working at a local hospital.  She was happy to have the attention of a person of authority and the two married.  But the moment Chauvin killed George Floyd, the power trip was over, and she filed for divorce.  She did not stand by her man of 10 years of marriage.  I only mention all that because it points to a problem with Derek Chauvin.  He cared too much about what people thought about him.  He didn’t care that his new wife was only into him for his badge.  He only wanted her for the bragging rights of having a beauty queen for a wife as well, so they both were getting what they wanted—until she couldn’t get what she needed out of the marriage once that relationship ended with his arrest. It’s a more subtle footnote to this tragedy built from the ground up on looks rather than reality.  Including the use of mobs to drive the verdict toward communist spread through the black communities using force as power. 

With the analysis of the wife and the competition of nightclub life, even as bouncers and security guards, you can likely understand that perhaps Chauvin put a little more force with his knee on Floyd’s neck due to those memories. I have some experience with these things from my early days.  I was a bouncer for a local nightclub, and women offer lots of things to get an advantage to the VIP sections.  And other men see these advantages that you have, and they try to kill you or hurt you any way they can. No doubt Chauvin was the kind of guy who enjoyed this power.  And it would also hurt him to see a guy like George Floyd getting the real attention from such ladies once the girls got into the club.  Hey, wild girls live and die by the sword.  Chauvin was a little too stuffy and strait-laced for those types of women who love to do crazy things with crazy big men of color.  Of course, we’ll never know for sure because nobody talks about these things, not even the men involved.  Likely Chauvin wasn’t smart enough to even consider what his subconscious motives were with Floyd.  He just knew the man from their shared past, and this was an opportunity to show off for the guys and impress his beauty queen wife when he got home that night.  The stoic cop she was attracted to being a big man on the job.

Much of this is speculation based on known conditions and experience.  But the question is not hard to determine whether or not Derek Chauvin went to work that day intent to kill George Floyd, and the answer is obvious. Derek Chauvin likely didn’t think too deeply about anything, even what he would have for breakfast on that particular day.  So he did not go out into the world intent to kill a black man that day.  Now when an old nightclub rival put himself at the mercy of the law and was intoxicated with drugs while Chauvin was instructing other cops on how to make proper arrests as an officer, well, you can see how things would have gone wrong.  But was it murder?  Or just an accident from two delinquents burdened with the responsibilities of manhood when in fact, neither was ready.  Yea, there was a lot wrong with this case, but murder wasn’t one of them. Instead, it was used to hide all the other intentions that are much more menacing. 

Cliffhanger the Overmanwarrior


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