The Call to Adventure: A 52 Week Project which photographs authenticiy

It was strange recently getting yet another notification from the Ohio courts of Butler County that I’ve been selected for jury duty because my name ends up in the hat so often due to my voting patterns.  I noticed while filling out the form which included my wife and kids that none of them have what you might call—“traditional” jobs.  My wife is a happy housewife, my oldest daughter a professional photographer who is very highly sought after and my youngest is an illustrator.  As I write this she, (my youngest) is doing a commission piece on the Batman villain The Joker shown below.  But none of the ladies in my family have a “traditional” job where they go to work, punch in and sell away their day for cash.  I know that’s the typical way that we measure economic success, but I’ve always been a big supporter of that type of freedom—especially for women because they tend to invest more into children, households and the emotional nurturing of a family as a whole.  When people are free of that primary concern of having to sell away their time for money, it allows them to invest in less tangible aspects of family building, so it makes me proud to see that among the women closest to me, they are all on that type of path.  They don’t have a “boss” out there they must yield to, and that is something I think is very important to family development, because it makes them the authority figures of their own lives which is why that question is asked on a jury selection form.  Attorneys obviously want to know that the people in their pool are “normal” people miserable like everyone else—so the way I answered that question likely will knock me out of the selection process.

My photographer daughter has really impressed me; she is taking her business to a new level as seen in these included videos.  She’s doing something called the 52 Weeks Project where each week she is picking a subject to photograph then she shows how she comes up with the shots and how the editing process goes on arriving at the final product.  She’s a full-time mom, but on both of these efforts she was up at dawn before her little boy woke up wanting breakfast and conducted these pictures for her project squeezing in a lot of creativity into an already packed day.  She’s been busy with booked appearances for several weeks now and coming up shortly after this publication she has a photo shoot in Chicago.  So what you see here is a very developed photographer who is expecting herself to be one of the great ones.  What she does is out of pure passion which I liken back to having the ability to be free of having a “boss” in her life who governs her away from home while on a time clock. That freedom has allowed her to expand her personal life in ways that I think are quite extraordinary—and necessary to achieve the level of art that she is shooting for.

Even her subjects are unique in the scheme of the photographic community.  Her first entry into the 52 weeks project was “A Call to Adventure” which I thought she managed to squeeze a lot out of while working in a very limited area within Cincinnati.   For those who don’t understand why a “Call to Adventure” is important it’s a classic motif most appropriately defined by Joseph Campbell in the telling of mythologies.  Usually after the first act of a movie or the introductory phase of a novel the main character is faced with a jumping off point from the static patterns of their normal life and into the promise of adventure provoked by some dynamic force. For some people the “Call to Adventure” might be as simple as a stranger approaching you from the back of a cab at a stop light while you’re walking to work in New York and asks you to help them get to the airport.  You must then decide to help or not because if you do, the static patterns of your day will be disrupted and that could have unpleasant consequences.  Then for others it might be an opportunity to fly to Cambodia to do sex traffic rescue work in some steamy jungle nightmare, but while there you make a new archaeological discovery that changes the world perspective on our knowledge of history.  The “Call to Adventure” is often how you can dramatically enrich your life for the better with vast experience, but to do so you must step away from your static patterns and allow dynamic forces into your life.

For instance, a friend of mine who worked on the Trump campaign in 2016 called me on a very busy day last week and asked me if I could appear on CNN the next day.  I had scheduled a lot of events and I really didn’t have the time.  After all I had an oversea meeting planned at the very same moment I was supposed to be on with Anderson Cooper.  So did I answer the call and go on CNN which was likely just going to do a hit piece.  As it turned out the CNN people were very gracious and were not the kind of gotcha people who Rush Limbaugh surmised when he talked about the event on his show.  I did the CNN segment along with some other peers and it got people talking and was fun to do.  I still managed to get all my work done—although it was different from my usual day and I could point to many times in my life where answering the “Call to Adventure” directly led to some very unusual experiences which ultimately enhanced my life.

I have learned over time to never get too rigid about things.  The “Call of Adventure” is something I consider so important that I often go out of my way to find it with a very laissez-faire approach to living and personal management.  I may start the day with all kinds of planned activities but by the end of it, I end up doing things I never thought I would at the start and that comes from saying yes to the “Call of Adventure.”  So it made me particularly proud to see my photographer daughter out there capturing not only dramatic photos but articulating that difficult concept artistically.  She, standing at the entrance of a forest goes back to some of the great Arthurian legends of the Middle Ages where the knights would all enter the forest of their various adventures at different points basically to establish that no two paths of adventure were the same for other people.  People must pick their own paths in life to be living truly authentic lives so here was my kid showing this rather difficult concept to explain with a simple photograph.  But as you can see from the editing process, it’s not so simple.IMG_4644

This brings me back to the importance of my girls not being encumbered with a traditional job—especially while raising their children.  If they put their children in daycare, there would be many fewer opportunities for the kids to experience the wonder of a life lived authentically, because the static schedules of daily living prohibit it—and true intellectual learning is often crippled in children as a result.  But for a mother who is there ready to answer that “Call to Adventure” at the slightest provocation a simple trip to the grocery store on a sunny summer in July might lead to a lifetime of discoveries that stay with young people forever because if the schedule of acquiring food is relaxed there may be opportunities for adventure that come up along the way—someone might need help changing a flat tire or a snake may be caught under a car in the grocery store parking lot and need help getting over to the cool grass before somebody runs it over.  You just never know—but there is tremendous value in following the “Call to Adventure” and it makes me feel very good to see that my daughter has matured to a point where she can understand it well enough to photograph.  That takes talent!

Rich Hoffman

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The Great Middletown Mound: A proper excavation is needed to discover the giant humans inside

IMG_4365Before there was ever an Indian Jones movie my teachers were telling me through those scholastic aptitude tests you take in elementary school that my three most likely occupations that I was most suited for were as an archaeologist, a test pilot, and a daredevil.  Of course those last two they didn’t take very seriously, but the first came after watching me with the other kids at COSI in Columbus where I often went off by myself to study things that interested me and I asked questions from the workers that were unexpected.  Over the years my wife talked me away from being a professional daredevil which has cheapened the cost of owning a car—so that’s a good thing.  Being a test pilot required training in the military and that is way too conformist for me.  On the skill side, it would be no problem, but on the taking orders side—forget it.  And archaeology didn’t pay enough.  I wanted a family and I like to spend time with them, so running all over the world getting dirty all the time for very little money wasn’t appealing as a career.  But I do enjoy it as a hobby and have never really put it away.  As a kid I grew up in Liberty Township and watched many neighborhoods develop over top of Indian burial mounds which didn’t bother me much because I like seeing new things come from the human race.  But the land that I grew up on always seemed to me to be holding some key to civilization that needed to be unlocked, so when opportunities came for me to live in different places around the world like New Zealand, New York, Los Angeles and Florida came up—I passed because I honestly feel like I live in one of the best places in the world—and I’ve traveled plenty to know the difference.

But it was only after reading Fritz Zimmerman’s very good book, The Nephilim Chronicles: A Travel Guide to the Ancient Ruins in the Ohio Valley that I noticed that the so-called Middletown Mound that I’ve read about before was actually across the river from my house quietly hiding in plain sight.  It was only then that I realized that the mound was actually about the same size as the Miamisburg Mound which I just revealed to everyone who reads here–contained the skeleton of a species of ancient giant.  That skeleton measured in length to around 9’ tall.  After that discovery the excavators packed up and never returned—which to me is an enormous mystery.  It is my challenge to the scientific community to return to that site and conduct a proper modern excavation and learn all they can about the culture that built the thing and discover where they came from—because likely the roots go way back to the British Isles and even further to the times of the Sumerian—pre deluge times if you believe in that kind of thing.IMG_4370

Thankfully, because of Indian Jones movies archaeology has seen a tremendous uptick in interest for the last three decades and a lot of very good discoveries have been made around the world and things are starting to become quite clear.  Of course the stubborn old academics are grudgingly holding onto their old theories about things, and modern politics has built a tremendous industry around the victimization of Indian tribes using those beaten people as a platform to win elections—but we are discovering that ancient giants lived in North America well before Columbus ever sailed the ocean blue to “discover” the New World.  It was new to Europe, but the rest of the world including the Chinese were already there and thriving.  And the evidence is in these mound building cultures which has been acquired by many inspired professional and amateur archaeologists that have set the stage for new conclusions about old things and their origins.

So as I was reading through Fritz’s travel guide I noticed that the Middletown Mound wasn’t just some little thing like the ones that many Liberty Township neighborhoods were built over—it was 88’ tall originally which made it as large as the Miamisburg Mound and nearly as tall as the Silbury Hill at Avebury in England.  And the thing was literally sitting right within my site—but nobody knew about it.  Even the people living near it would just point at it and say—“yeah, that’s where them there Indians have some ‘ingines’ buried.”  In reality, and its hiiiigglly likely, there are 8’ to 9’ people buried within the Middletown Mound given what we know about the one in Miamisburg and the surrounding gravel quarries along the Great Miami River.

Of course I went down to see it and you can see the results from the pictures shown here, it’s a location protected as an archaeological site of Historic Places beginning in 1971.  So thankfully, nobody can build on it, but otherwise it’s just sitting there waiting for us to discover and give it some attention—which it clearly deserves.  It is clear that archaeologists had dug an exploratory trench through the middle of it and that the top had been pulled away, but the incomplete nature of it is incomprehensible to me.  How could anybody call themselves an institute of science and leave something this significant sitting in such a dilapidated state?  It is beyond me that politics and religion would be allowed to hinder us from proper scientific discovery of facts sitting right in front of us.

If this Middletown Mound site were in England the English Heritage people would have built a theme park out of the mound and used the money to fund their excavations and trickle their excess funds into museums like the Museum Center in Cincinnati.  Looking at the site there is enough to work with to conduct a significant dig while hosting it to the public for families to visit and get to know better.  And if giants are found in the mound—they need to be properly woven into our historical record.  If not, we still need to know more about the people who built it and not just rely on some raw assumptions that it served as a high point for communication upstream.

And honestly, this is why I have never left Liberty Township.  I think this area, and in general Ohio, hold a key to life on planet earth that is still preserved from wars which have destroyed the Middle East—where I think these mound builders originated.  Fritz Zimmerman’s books confirm much of what I’ve suspected with hard evidence of rather intricate ancient ruins and the Middletown Mound is more than just a high spot built by an extinct people.  It’s an ancient ruin likely dating back to before Christ and it needs to be understood clearly—not half cocked with speculation by underfunded grave robbers.  After visiting the site of the Middletown Mound I think there is at least 80% potential that what could be discovered inside would change the very nature of archaeology forever—and drive infinite amounts of money in new funding toward the science.  And we’d be crazy not to do something about it—which is why I’m writing this.  The people who read here know who I’m talking to.  Let’s get our thoughts together and do something about it.  Such an important archaeological contributor is in Butler County, Ohio and we should do it justice for the benefit of everyone.  I saw what they did at Stonehenge recently, which was very impressive.  Some might say that this kind of thing isn’t as cool as Stonehenge, but let me say this—I just came from that mysterious place, and the Middletown Mound holds its place in the category of mystery that is equitable.  We should be doing more with it than just letting trees grow on top of something so potentially significant.  But forget about the whole argument about the site being a “Native American Graves” site, because as I’ve stated, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), Pub. L. 101-601, 25 U.S.C. 3001 et seq., 104 Stat. 3048, the United States federal law enacted on 16 November 1990 needs to be repealed so that proper discovery can take place of such sites—because “Native American” is not a proper term for the people who lived in North America unless you count the Giants of Ohio who lived here well before Europeans arrived after Columbus.

And we can’t properly do that work if we are always apologizing for the sorrows of westward expansion.  That is mostly why that great Middletown Mound is sitting there in limbo—and we are compelled to change that status.  The lineal descendants of the relics found in the Middletown Mound won’t be the Shawnee, Adena, or the Hopewell Indians, likely they will be the members of the current Middle East who have a heritage with Sumer. So don’t worry about tracking down whatever Indian tribe might own the relics found in the Middletown Mound to Oklahoma or South Dakota, or wherever.  The lineal descendants who have proper heritage possession of the mound’s contents are those of us still alive in the United States to tell this global story for the benefit of all mankind.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

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Cliffhanger’s Exopolitical Theater: Giants, a galactic alliance, and human immortality coming to ‘The Curse of Fort Seven Mile’

While I was on the air with Matt Clark during his WAAM radio broadcast recently he wanted me to talk a bit about my latest Curse of Fort Seven Mile series.  However, time ran out and we couldn’t get into the details.  Actually, I don’t think I could cover all the details in an hour show, or a 10 hour show.  For me, what started as a simple pulp fiction series has evolved into something I would term as a philosophy for the 22nd century.  The below videos will help with the context but essentially what I’m doing is this: over the next one hundred years we are going to discover that we are not alone in the solar system, let alone the galaxy.  We will learn to defy death.  We will unlock all the potentials of a Type 1 civilization and that will require us to completely revisit our current political and religious philosophies—because the present ones just won’t be sufficient.  That’s not a knock on anybody, but the discoveries of the next century will just unlock a massive amount of potential that isn’t even forecasted on the horizon as of yet—and people will need some means of thinking about those things if they want to survive.

I have been pretty adamant about my hobbies and positions.  I essentially grew up studying mythologies and religious cultures, but I like to make money, so I chose professional endeavors that I could raise a family on—but there is a lot about me that is very sympathetic to the Nathan Drake video game character.  The people I most admire these days are people like Josh Gates and his friend Erin Ryder.  If I did not love family as much as I do, I would have loved to live the life that they have—and believe me I have no regrets.  But I do read and watch a lot of what those fantastic people have put out as far as discovery over the years.  When they tackle some crypto mystery much of it comes out to nothing, but it’s the asking of the questions that I find absolutely amazing.  There are a lot of people, many whom are featured in these videos who have committed enormous amounts of time and resources to asking hard questions about mankind’s origins—and I’ll be honest—I love each and every one of them.  When I listen to their lectures and read their books I think in the best case scenarios, they may be getting 50% of any given idea correct.  But even 1% of what these people are saying they are major game changers for the entire human race and the world at large.

In spite of my love of guns, capitalism, business entrepreneurial activity, innovation and pop culture, I am most at home with books, museums, and very smart people.  One of my best friends growing up had an IQ of around 170 so I know those types of people excessively well, and I love being around them.  Some of the people in these videos like Steve Quayle remind me of that friend.  They are too smart for mainstream society, and they are usually defined as lunatics by a society which embraces too openly—sheer stupidity.  As long as I’ve been on earth, I have asked similar hard questions and sought the answers and I have a general theory about the reason that ancient cultures collapse—actually all cultures including recent ones.  I published my thesis in a screenplay, which won a few awards along the way called The Lost Cannibals of Cahokia.  While most archaeologists and anthropologists will point to environmental conditions and say that the reason that a culture fails is related to a loss of water, or of food supply—usually those opinions are corrupted by their left leaning educations.  My theory is that cultures fail because of the human inclination to the Vico cycle—where they just can’t seem to get off the treadmill—and they have been like that for their entire existence.  That screenplay would probably make a good movie and I should probably push it more toward production—and maybe I will.  My goal in writing it was to get the thesis down in an entertaining way that people could enjoy—but come away from the story asking hard questions like—what is the primary driver of a successful culture—then offering the answer as the climax amid the usual expectations of exciting storytelling.  After I shopped that script around it became obvious that I’d have to produce the picture myself to do it right, and honestly, I didn’t have the time or patience to “collaborate” the way it takes to make a movie.  So I shelved it and offered it as a legitimate thesis about the rise and fall of civilizations.  On the surface, it was an action adventure horror story, underneath was something that meant a lot to me which was based on many thousands of hours of reading and personal discovery—traveling all over the world checking things out for myself—a little the way Josh Gates has—only with fewer frequent flyer miles.

Lately, there has been an explosion, likely because of the Internet, of conspiracy theories and examinations into a hidden past that does not agree with the Leaky evolutionary theories.  The latest revisions are probably driven more by Jurassic Park’s DNA examples and the popular Lord of the Rings movies about Middle Earth—art has helped our society ask new questions from a fresh perspective—and the answers to those questions might just be explosive.  If only 1% is true, mankind is in for some startling revelations.  The best movies and books are the ones that make you ask, “what if,” and as the videos included here surmise, there are some very smart people who are asking lots of questions tainted by their personal backgrounds.  But it is what they agree on that has stimulated my thinking and focused my mind on the hard evidence that is rapidly pouring in.

I wanted to write another Cliffhanger novel but I wanted it to be relevant to the world 100 years from now the way I read Jules Verne, Ayn Rand, H.P. Lovecraft or even Shakespeare.  My favorite play of his is Titus Andronicus.   His use of extreme violence to tell the moral story of love and loss—as well as dedication are the kinds of things I find infinitely fascinating and it doesn’t matter when in history we read such a story—they still communicate a truth which is valuable.  Having these kinds of interests I couldn’t just write some average piece of fiction reviewers of today would like—I wanted to write something that people a century from now would marvel at and would still draw inspiration from.  Yet I also wanted to make the argument that the values America had from around 1870 to about 1900 were the best the world had ever seen, and that those values should be captured in a bottle and examined in actually a scientific way—as having merit on culture building itself.  The economic means of the country was explosive during that period, morality was respectable, and collectivism was being defeated wherever it was encountered—namely during westward expansion.

For about forty years I have had in my mind a really terrible antagonist and a concept for painting it into a story against the ultimate protagonist—but I needed to collect a lot of information to tell that story.  Finally, I feel like I’m there.  Once I had all the details worked out, I went to work writing it—and as I thought, it has turned out to be the byproduct of a hyperactive imagination, a technical background, legitimate scientific investigation and all the life experience learned in every hard way imaginable.

Knowing that over the next couple decades history will have to reflect what we are learning now—and that we will learn that not only are we not alone, but that we are currently in a relationship with thinking beings not from earth’s origin story and that the essential ingredient to a successful society resides within individual behavior as opposed to collective salvation—and that once that process begins—where democracies run by a mob take over the individual input of actual leaders—that all civilizations stop functioning and regress back to their beginnings.

Even as my protagonist, Cliffhanger fights bad guys with flaming bullwhips all in the name of justice—it is important these days to define the merits of that justice.  It is not enough to simply show bad and good—it has to be defined by actual universal rules of engagement as defined by the observable conditions of our cosmos.  To do that we have to step beyond our veil of politics and modern philosophy and take the next step.  Taking that step is what and why I’m committing so much time to this new Cliffhanger story.  Similarly to that Cannibals of Cahokia story—this Curse of Fort Seven Mile has the benefit of an additional twenty years of hard living and earned observation.  Like H.P. Lovecraft I have a love for pulp fiction written in a romantic fashion—and on the surface that is what these new Cliffhanger stories are.  But, my protagonist, Fletcher Finnegan in The Curse of Fort Seven Mile is actually named after one of my favorite literary figures of all time, the giant in Finnegan’s Wake from the James Joyce classic.  My goals with the work are not to reach the New York Best Seller’s list, or even to get reviews from Publisher’s Weekly.  It is to offer a useful philosophy for people grappling with real significant challenges to everything they believed was true for over 10,000 years and to provide them a softer landing philosophically—so to maybe for the first time in human history to provoke a change in mankind’s propensity to always revert back to the Vico cycle.  Thus Spoke Cliffhanger.

If you want a preview of this work they are available on the sidebar.  But the real meat is yet to come and why I am dedicating some specific time and resources to completing it.  To get a sense of it, just watch all these videos and you’ll get your mind ready to read what I’m putting into a story intended for readers of the next century.  I’m not giving up on politics.  But rather it is too small of a shoe for me now.  The next obvious evolution is exopolitical theater and the vast changes it will bring.  Currently it is a bit on the fringe side, but that will change rapidly—and when it does–well, people will want a point of reference and fiction is a good place to begin—by bridging what we know with what we will come to understand.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

Life on the Moon: The ancient past and modern activity of alien life above our heads

I don’t say things until I’ve considered the evidence intently and one of the reasons I’ve been most insistent to write The Curse of Fort Seven Mile with an emphasis of late is because of a realization that I’ve discovered through quite a lot of research.  These rumors of some type of life on the Moon of our earth have some weight to them.  From the 1976 book written by George Leonard Somebody Else Is on the Moon (linked below) compelling evidence from actual NASA photographs open the topic profoundly.  It’s an expensive book to get, but well worth it.  Additionally I think it is the remarks of the astronauts who have actually walked on the moon, people like Edger Mitchell and Buzz Aldren who have provided such virtuous testimony—some intentionally, some not so much so.  The evidence points more to the fact that there are constructions on the moon that shouldn’t be there and that there is presently, or has been, an alien race active on its surface.  If you can’t afford the old Leonard book feel free to watch these following videos for some supportive evidence to the fact.

http://www.amazon.com/Somebody-Else-Moon-Artifacts-Leonard/dp/1499250797/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1462071157&sr=1-2&keywords=ulos+unidentified+lunar+objects

One of my first big memories as a kid was visiting the Neal Armstrong museum at Wapakoneta, Ohio while my family went on a trip to Put-in-Bay—I was around four years old.  Years after that, my class went on a field trip to the museum there while in grade school and I oddly enough remembered  most everything because I had been there before.  I was the kid who always read the literature on the exhibits, so I felt very much at home compared to the other kids who had seen the place for the first time.  Armstrong was a professor at the University of Cincinnati—which was in my hometown and his life occurred very much around me—and I was aware of that growing up.  Aviation was born around me as well, so I’ve always taken some pride in the Wright Brothers and old test pilots like Neal Armstrong who was obviously the first person to walk on the moon—at least that we know of.  What always bothered me about Armstrong was that he had turned inward after the experience.  He wasn’t like Buzz Aldren—Armstrong didn’t relish the celebrity of being the first man on the moon—he had a secret which he avoided talking about and obviously took to his death.

Given Armstrong’s Midwestern roots, I think the guy didn’t like lying to people about what he saw on the moon when NASA switched to a private broadcast while he and Buzz were standing on the surface in July of 1969.  I was one year old at the time and my parents were standing me up in front of the television to see the event.  All I remember of the occurrence was the shape of the ship and the sounds of the transmissions which I recognized at the museum years later in Wapakoneta.  I didn’t understand the context at the time, but the layers of memory solidified it in my thinking for years to come.  While everyone was impressed that mankind was standing on the moon, Armstrong had confirmed much of what NASA wanted to see, which wasn’t filmed with cameras that were made public.  We were not alone—not by a long shot—and it haunted him for the rest of his life—apparently.

I’ve talked about the moon before, there are several things not right with it—it’s a little too perfectly positioned and it is locked in a type of orbit around the earth that never shows its far side.  That is a little weird as well.  And apparently on the far side there are even more strange photographs of things that should not be there if Neil Armstrong was truly the first life form to ever walk on the surface.  This of course has led to a lot of speculation through science fiction but those entries into are rooted in fact.  For me the most compelling evidence is that we have not returned—and neither has any other country.  The technology is clearly available to us now, yet we aren’t going back after those initial Apollo missions.  Some of the astronauts involved in the Apollo missions are now very supportive of alien life in space even if they do preserve their disclosures agreements with NASA which is after all a government agency which thinks it knows best how to preserve the religions and social order of the society it is supposed to serve.

Just a few miles south of where the Wright Brothers ran their bicycle shop which invented aviation the bones of an undocumented giant species of man was found in Miamisburg—one very large skeleton at a gravel quarry near the Great Miami River and the other under a large tree which was uprooted at a farm which bordered the mysterious Miamisburg mound complex.  Strangely enough, Hanger 18 which housed the wreckage of the Roswell crash was also nearby and to prevent proper excavation of the Miamisburg site by archaeologists and anthropologists a nuclear weapon facility was built on the land called Mound Laboratories.  That certainly stopped any real research into the region by credentialed scientists.  I currently live on the banks of the Great Miami River south of that Miamisburg site, so all these conspiracy stories have been with me for my entire life—and nobody wants to give any real answers to the probing questions—which feeds the conspiracies.   My conclusion is that there is much more to the story which is why everyone is so tight lipped.  The authorities in this case would rather not confirm or deny—they’d just prefer to avoid the topic.  But the evidence is rather compelling–it’s is all around us—we just need to look at it.

Given all that evidence, it’s just a matter of time before we have to go to the moon and discover what NASA has been avoiding to tell us.  Private space companies are headed to the moon and within just a few years of now, there will be hotels on the surface—and by then we’ll learn the hard truth—it won’t be a secret any longer.  There is a presence of some life other than our own on the moon right now and they watch us from there for reasons that we’ll discover.  I would propose that it’s a kind of interplanetary base camp and they find our civilization interesting and likely some kind of social experiment that they check up on frequently.  Just yesterday I drove by the Serpent Mound site in eastern, Ohio and scientists are no closer to figuring out the reason for that strange mound than they were twenty years ago.  In fact, they have more questions now than answers.  If our science cannot figure out the meaning of things in our own back yards, then they surely aren’t prepared to deal with what’s on the surface of the moon—an entire celestial body that has not had any of its history covered yet by modern development.  It’s an open text-book of mankind’s past and whoever was a part of helping to shape it from inception.  And it floats there above our heads—all the answers we seek—yet we do not dare to uncover.  Actually, you and I might dear reader—but our governments want to hold onto their power for just a while longer.  The evidence is there for us to investigate and when we do we have a lot of hard questions to answer about ourselves.  Of course the first step will be in returning—and I can’t wait for that to occur.  I’d rather know the truth than live with illusions.

Europeans did not discover America–the giants in the Ohio mounds prove that.  They were in North America before there was ever an Indian or a Christopher Columbus voyage.  And we did not first walk on the moon.  Someone was there before us and they are still there. ………………………………

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Sign up for Second Call Defense here:  http://www.secondcalldefense.org/?affiliate=20707  Use my name to get added benefits.

1-40 Tunnels: Explaining the next phase

I have to address a couple matters, one is fun, and the other is a clarification. First off, the picture shown here is the twin tunnels on I-40 in North Carolina just 4 miles south of the Tennessee border. For those in the media who are reading the advance copies of my new novel and have read the very exciting scene involving the roadblock at the twin tunnels, that scene takes place on the other side of that mountain at the mouth of those two tunnels. It is easy to see why the gunfire and explosions caused so much trouble when you observe how rugged the landscape is in that region.

I put that picture up because currently road crews are closing that tunnel at night diverting traffic through a service road so that the tunnel can undergo much-needed maintenance. For those who have read the novel, the kind of thing that happens in the story is a serious threat in that area, and requires constant maintenance. For those who have not read that scene, you will soon find out. Loud noises and violent behavior are not good for such areas. But it’s a fun fact of the novel to know that such an extreme occurrence is quite possible, and care must be constantly taken to avoid such catastrophes.

The other thing is attached to my new book as well. Some of my readers here–people I respect a great deal–are concerned that I may lose my credibility with the school levy issues by appearing self-serving because of all my promotional efforts over my new book. This deserves a bit of explanation that is needed at this point for my readers who visit Overmanwarrior’s Wisdom every day. To begin, a reminder of what my life was like before I got personally involved in the Lakota Levy in 2010 needs to be seen. The video below is a sample of the kind of life I lived before joining forces with the people who would eventually make up No Lakota Levy to defeat those tax increases. The efforts of my previous book, and several film festivals along with my other exertion in a professional sense had me constantly on the road, going to award shows, trade shows, and many other adventures that come as part of that life, which I put on hold to help solve community issues.

In 2010 I put aside some of these fun occupational endeavors and took a few years to contribute something to the battle that is raging in our nation. I started helping local liberty groups where I could, as I still do. I started this blog site as a way to offset the information that the newspapers wouldn’t cover, and I took on the Lakota School Levy because it was a lie being told on the backs of children, and looked to be devastating to a community I grew up in, and is currently in my hands to protect. I was between books anyway completing The Symposium of Justice in 2004, and was writing Tail of the Dragon and doing my research to make that manuscript into a saleable story that American Book Publishing would eventually pick up.

Working around progressive entertainment types I knew what kinds of things pro tax advocates would attack in my character, so when the Enquirer did the article about me featuring my whip work, I knew how the politics would play out. Believe me; it was very much by design. The pro tax people ridiculed my use of whips which helped me figure out who was who. I used that information to my advantage. I didn’t fight those levies to be mean, or destructive. I did it because it was the right thing to do. My ultimate message was the importance of traditional values versus progressive values being taught in school, and I didn’t then nor in the future wish to pay higher taxes for a “progressive” education. I could have went around the country doing dozens of whip shows trying to promote traditional values, or I could do the unthinkable and apply those skills to explaining Keynesian economics which is how public schools function much to their own detriment. Of course I chose the latter.

Before the start of the last levy campaign I told my friends in No Lakota Levy that I had a book coming out in 2012, and they needed to find another spokesman for the levy fighting effort. I told them I’d still fight the levy, but I didn’t think it would be right to do media stuff for my book, and do media stuff against the levy, because the mixture would appear self-serving. For that very reason I avoided any elected offices, even though many wanted me to volunteer, because when Tail of the Dragon was ready to come out, I would have to put my effort behind that promotional endeavor, and being formerly involved in Tea Parties and other official positions while promoting a book is tacky. I don’t like it when others do it, so I sure wasn’t about to do it myself. I hoped that after two solid years of fighting levies that other people had learned how to do it, and could become the face of those efforts in the future.

In February of 2012 it was time to make a change which had been talked about ahead of time, so I picked the fight that would bring all the rats to the surface so everyone could see who was hiding where. The pro tax supporters conducted a negative survey against me outside a local Kroger store, so the time to act was then. I let my anger go, because it was well justified and it created the opportunity I needed to take this next step. This allowed new people at No Lakota Levy to pick up the baton and carry on. I of course would continue to cover things as I had, but I needed the freedom to move on to book promotion mode.

I know people who successfully have their hands in everything, but I’m not like that. I enjoy my time to myself, so I don’t like being too busy. If I’m going to promote a book, I’ll put my effort into it, since it’s something I already believe in. When the time comes to fight for another community issue, I’ll be there. If the group we have in place is not ready, then I’ll assemble another one to meet the challenge. It’s that simple. But life is always in motion, and especially at my age, it is very busy.

A lot of people on the inside believe that Tail of the Dragon will do well. They believe it’s a very good book, and I am inclined to agree. But you just never know. The public may reject it, the timing may not be right, there could be problems. Any number of things can happen, and they often do. I hope the book does well, because if it does I will get the chance to write a book I’ve been thinking about for over ten years, called The Trial of Fletcher Finnegan. That book looks to be well over 1 million words. It will be considerably larger than Atlas Shrugged and will be quite an effort. I will need a good showing out of Tail of the Dragon to free my time up enough to be able to write the new book because it will be an exclusive task of mine for a number of years.

So I am putting out a lot of promotional material. These days, that’s how it’s done. For my daily readers, some of which have already read and loved the book, they are getting tired of seeing all my promotional stuff, because they’ve already been there and done it. It’s a good memory for them, but it isn’t new any longer. But for many people every day who come here for the first time, I put those ads up for them. Today alone I have multiple readers from 13 different countries ranging from Sweden, Romania, and Saudi Arabia to New Zealand and Australia. This is pretty normal, and as it would be thought that these readers are tuning in to see what happened in the Colorado shooting, ironically most of the views come from my articles about school levies. All those countries mentioned each had more than 10 hits each, so the Tail of the Dragon ads are important to gaining international exposure. Even though my daily readers are used to the Tail of the Dragon cover and blurbs, many of these international readers are just seeing them for the first time.

If I were in an elected office, or was an official spokesman paid by someone else to represent a product, I wouldn’t cross promote my personal projects with Lakota stories, or political material concerning the presidential election. But the fact of the matter is that I have deliberately made myself free of those obligations so I can do what I have been planning for quite some time. At this time there isn’t a levy at Lakota to fight, and there are plenty of ground troops in the liberty groups to handle the administrative stuff. I do my part in giving a local voice to many contemporary issues that get missed in the mainstream media outlets, stuff the liberty groups need to advance their positions, being someone who can untangle the complicated web of modern politics so it’s easy for others to see.

I offer the work at Overmanwarrior’s Wisdom for free, because there is a need for it. If I make money it is not from memberships, or any donation. It will be because someone bought a book of mine. I work through many of the problems that will be in future stories by putting my thoughts and notes up for all to see, so I can refine those thoughts into more articulate works in actual books in the future. A good portion of these articles are my personal notes that I share for the development of ideas. I figure that if I need to resolve my thoughts on a matter than others do as well, so by putting the articles on this forum, I hope they help others.

But I don’t formally belong to any groups so I can have the freedom to pursue my own path, so that I cannot be accused of indulging in self-serving messages. Once the novel comes out, I may change that, but for the time being, that’s the way it has to be due to the nature of public relations. I support many groups, and I may attend their meetings. However to avoid the accusations of being self-serving, I keep my involvement limited to a supportive role. For me the most supportive role I can think of is to help frame the argument so others can see it clearly, and act on it. I had an open window between projects to offer myself publicly to controversial subjects, and I will have an open window again. But as of now that window is closed. That does not mean I will not write and contribute articles for analysis as I have, but my official spokesman roles for those endeavors will have to be on hold till my window opens once again.

I hope that clears things up for those who were wondering. It is much easier to answer the question this way as opposed to separate emails. When it comes to these kinds of things, constant reinvention of roles is very important so that stagnation does not set in. When you get a chance to work on a project that has national exposure, you take it, because the results will be useful later.

____________________________________________

This is what people are saying about my new book–Tail of the Dragon

Just finished the book and am sweating profusely. Wow, what a ride !!!  Fasten your seat belts for one of the most thrilling rides ever in print.

Visit the NEW Tail of the Dragon WEBSITE!  CLICK HERE!

Rich Hoffman
https://overmanwarrior.wordpress.com/2010/12/04/ten-rules-to-live-by/
http://twitter.com/#!/overmanwarrior
www.overmanwarrior.com

“Community Conversations”: Lakota spends a QUARTER MILLION DOLLARS on manipulation

I personally think Ben Dibble as president of the Lakota School Board is a better fit than what we’ve had in the past. I can deal with people who don’t think the way I do, since usually the differences are in understanding. But I refuse to deal with thugs who wish to convince me that a lie is the truth. When Ben said “We need more direction from our community on where it thinks our school district should be heading and what level of service it’s willing to fund,” the school board president is speaking from his perspective and political affiliation. Unfortunately flowery progressive types who don’t have much business experience see the world through rose-colored glasses, which corrupts their decision-making. The elements missing from Ben’s statement is that the cost of that funding is up for negotiation. Cost is not a fixed item and that is the heart of the problem at Lakota and every other public school in Ohio and across the country. Public education has a monopoly on education because of government involvement. It is because there is no competition that education costs are so high, and that is why there are not enough tax dollars to fund public education, because the salary expectations are simply too high because there’s no competition to keep the costs low.

In private conversations most of the people on the inside know what the problem is, but they lack the fortitude to confront the situation. So they go on the attack against people like me who point out the problem with varied degrees of coercion. Anyone who knows me personally understands that sending a bunch of latte sipping prostitutes outside of a Kroger store to take a survey against my name with the intention of running me out of the town is not the smart thing to do. That kind of thing is an act of war in my opinion, so that is not the way to solve problems; it will just piss me off. School superintendents and school board presidents know that there are serious problems with the education funding formula and they know it is caused due to their monopoly power. So to close the perception gap and keep people from looking too closely into their affairs without thuggish union coercion is the reason they hire public relations personnel and consultants.

Lakota even though they have agreed to not put the community through another tax increase in 2012 is already making aggressive plans for the near future because they just don’t understand at a fundamental level that the gravy train of the teaching profession is over, and that they must adjust their costs to the market value that is trying to establish itself. Instead, they have decided to fight the community once again and they have loaded up on public relations help in a big way to help put them over the top. On July 16th Lakota approved the contract of Randy Oppenheimer to serve as community relations consultant paying him $67,000 for 50 weeks. It looks as though Lakota was not happy with the work of Elliot Grossman who they paid $73,000 from October 2011 immediately after the $90,000 payout to the previous public relations consultant Laura Kursman, to the present. Lakota has spent a lot of tax payer money on trying to hide their budget management problems which are locked in archaic union contracts that have driven up their employee costs. The public relations consultants are hired to deflect attention away from this problem and place it upon the students who attend the school creating an emotional argument for many parents designed to defy logic.

Without question Superintendent Mantia is excited to see that Oppenheimer worked as a public relations consultant at Fairfield which just barely passed their school levy in the most recent election. Mantia and the Lakota gang hope that Oppenheimer can pull the same strings with his connections to the Middletown Journal and other papers to use those publications as mouthpieces for higher taxes actively promoting the school without journalistic appraisal.

But Lakota didn’t stop there. They are taking the extra public relations step of going on the offense by hiring a very progressive political group called Citizens for Civic Renewal to come from their projects in Over-the-Reign and the Freedom Center to Lakota with a program they call “Community Conversation.” The actual term for this action Lakota is spending tax payer money on, should be “Community Conversion,” because what the Citizens for Civic Renewal are planning to do with “Community Conversation” is just a different name for The Delphi Technique created by Saul Alinsky. For this service Lakota is paying $40,000 to Jeffrey Stec who is the executive director of Citizens for Civic Renewal to “engage” the community and convince them of why they should “step up” and pay higher taxes for the school in their district.

But here’s where Jeffrey will run into problems. What he will run into at Lakota as opposed to his work in downtown Cincinnati is that the people who live in Liberty Twp, and West Chester live there because they wanted to move away from the kind of people Jeffrey is, who is a progressive big government guy attempting to keep all the New Deal and “Great Society” policies progressive politics has enacted over the last century that have driven up taxes, particularly in the metropolitan areas. Jeffery’s group is in denial of those costs and the actual merit of those services. Since he is viewing the world in a progressive manner, he believes that the rest of society has a social contract with each other to always support the policies of those communist leaning programs created during the Cold War in direct reaction to the political conditions of the great Soviet threat. One of those programs was “collective bargaining” for public unions which didn’t start in Ohio until 1983. It has been a failure, and is directly responsible for schools like Lakota to operate at uncontrollably high costs.

There are neighborhoods in Lakota, like Four Bridges, that are filled with younger families who have found themselves in well-paying jobs, but are still immature and lacking world experience. Because they are busy parents they feel insecure in parental roles and wish to believe they can purchase through higher taxes good futures for their children. They tend to support school levies, because they lack worldly experience and just don’t know any better. Jeffery with his group is being paid to further perpetuate that myth. But a majority of the communities in Liberty Twp., and West Chester are older people who have been around and have raised families of their own. Many families are actual entrepreneurs and business managers who have had to make hard financial decisions in their businesses, so they see the truth, and those people will not have any sympathy for Jeffery and his progressive group. Most of the people moved or stayed in Lakota to avoid progressive types like Jeffery, so his “Community Conversations” will not be well received.

I’m sure Oppenheimer will manage to convince the Pulse Journal to write flowery articles about Jeffery’s attempts, and Michael Clark at the Cincinnati Enquirer will eat out of Oppenheimer’s hand, since Lakota has convinced Clark to choose between me, and the school. Newspaper reporters know they need the school stories to keep their livelihoods going, so they will choose who puts money in their pocket 100% of the time, and I don’t put money in the Enquirer’s pocket. The coverage of these “Community Conversations” is already set. It’s bought and paid for with our tax dollars in a hope to convince Lakota tax payers to approve higher taxes on themselves in a district with declining enrollment, where layoffs will become necessary for the next 10 years regardless of levy passage. The housing boom in Butler County is over. There will still be real estate sales, but at nowhere near the levels that the levy supporter, real estate agent, school board members like Joan Powell have enjoyed in the past. They are in denial of their personal circumstances and are hoping that Oppenheimer and “Community Conversation” will supply them once again with the kind of financial gravy they enjoyed in the previous decade.

The cost of that gravy is enormous. In just one calendar year, Lakota has spent a quarter million dollars on four public relations consultants to bring them to this initiative of “Community Conversation” and a structure to help sell it to the public. $250,000 of tax payer dollars has been consumed at Lakota to sell the concept of higher taxes to those same tax payers. At best it is disingenuous to the intelligence of Lakota residents to impose on them more political games by aligning the school of a conservative community to the nonsense of goofy, idealistic progressives whose only answer to everything in life is to spend more money.

My hopes that Lakota would listen to the community and actually manage their finances have just flown out the window. They just can’t get it through their minds that the members of the community do not exist to create jobs for education professionals. We just want our kids to get an education, and for busy parents, they need a day care facility while they work two jobs to live in homes that have $5000 a year property tax obligations. The quality of a school is in the people of the community, not in the employees of the school. As I’ve said thousands of times, every employee at Lakota could be fired and replaced with cheaper new employees, and the quality at Lakota would not decrease, because the kids come from quality households. And those households moved to Lakota to avoid progressive fools who think “big government” is “hip” and an obligation for society. It is in the quality of the people who live in the district that makes Lakota great. It is not the school, or the quarter million dollars spent on public relations to attempt to convince conservative families in the Lakota District otherwise. The problem of education funding is a result of an education monopoly driven by unionized labor resistant to technological changes. The purpose of public relation firms is to hide that fact from the tax payer with glossy, emotional stories about children and community pride. The intent is to survive just a bit longer when the market conditions are demanding changes, so the current employees can preserve their salary demands and meet their retirement options. In the end, it’s far from being about the children, it’s all about the money and the endless desire for more sold behind the mask of “Community Conversations.”

____________________________________________

This is what people are saying about my new book–Tail of the Dragon

Just finished the book and am sweating profusely. Wow, what a ride !!!  Fasten your seat belts for one of the most thrilling rides ever in print.

Visit the NEW Tail of the Dragon WEBSITE!  CLICK HERE!

Rich Hoffman
https://overmanwarrior.wordpress.com/2010/12/04/ten-rules-to-live-by/
http://twitter.com/#!/overmanwarrior
www.overmanwarrior.com

The Banality of Evil: Why Joe Paterno is just as terrible as Barack Obama and Adolph Eichmann

Hannah Arndt upon witnessing the trial of Adolph Eichmann, one of the Holocaust organizers against the Jewish people, was shocked that Eichmann did not appear in public to be a vile monster oozing desire for death and mayhem. Instead, he maintained an apparent, “everydayness” that shocked her, leaving her to conclude that evil does not come from malevolence or a delight in doing wrong. Instead she suggested the reasons people act in such a way is that they fall victim to failures in thinking and judgments. In Eichmann’s situation he allowed himself to believe that by killing Jews, he was doing good-by the Nazi Party. Killing a millions of Jews made tens of millions of Germans happy, so he rationalized his sinister actions as party loyalty. As ridiculous as that sounds such evil is not regulated to an event long ago, in a far away land. Former FBI Director Louis Freeh, recently released a report that shows Penn State coaching legend Joe Paterno and the rest of university leadership knew that former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky was anally raping young boys and they conspired to cover it up from the public to protect the university.

The crimes against children advocated by a major college university is a very serious crime. Yet, Penn State is not alone. At this very moment, many such crimes are being committed right now, and many people know about it, and like Joe Paterno, they will put the good of the institutions they serve ahead of their individual sense of right and wrong. This essentially is no different from what Adolph Eichmann was doing as a founder of the Holocaust death camps. When Joe Paterno spoke, people listened, and to this very day hundreds of thousands of people are shattered to learn that a person they looked up to let them down, and they are seeking to rationalize Paterno’s evil with the same observations that Hannah Arndt observed.

The evil at Penn State began with a sick lust for pedophilia by the defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky. The Freeh report shows that the entire university knew about the crimes, yet their approach was to cover it up and quietly remove Sandusky from the public eye allowing him to retire hoping the scandal would disappear. The leadership at Penn State was afraid of the loss of enrollment into their school if such a public relations nightmare escaped their control. It is well-known that colleges depend on college sports to justify their extraordinary social costs in tax money consumed and actual services offered to society. Through sports, colleges unify their students, the parents and the communities who pay the taxes into a sense of collectivism that rationalizes evil in favor of the institutional success.

Unforgivable evils are committed when institutions and their sanctity surpass the value of an individual. Paterno no matter what he felt about the anal rapes of young boys in the showers just outside of his office placed the value of Penn State above the value of the boys being raped. Every member of Penn State leadership contributed to the evil by seeking ways to cover up Sandusky’s acts instead of helping the young boys, because to them, they were following the concept of Marxism, the needs of the many out-weigh the needs of the few. It was Spock who said that in the Star Trek film The Wrath of Khan, which is the contemporary example of Jeremy Bentham’s 1789 book The Principles of Morals and Legislation where he states all social and political decisions should be made with the aim of achieving the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people. Bentham’s premise is collectivism, Spock’s premise is collectivism, and Paterno’s premise is collectivism. All believe that the evils committed against individuals do not outweigh the survival of the collective institution.

In the Penn State case officials had been taught all their lives to regard such examples of collectivism as an honorable thing and are dumbfounded as to how to respond Sandusky’s antics. Do they suspend Penn State from the juggernaut Big Ten football participation? If they do that what will happen to all the revenue attached to Penn State Football, or even the Big Ten? Even officials in the NCAA are willing to look the other way to save their institutional commitment to Big Ten Football. They will do something now that the FBI forced their hand, but prior to all this, they looked the other way. Everyone knew about Jerry Sandusky’s obsession with little boys, that’s why nobody offered him a football job after he retired. ESPN is in the same boat. They make their livings talking about the great distraction of sports, and such scandals might turn people away from sports, which could seriously harm revenue.

Right now It’s well known that President Obama is undoing America. Since he took office American wealth has declined by 40%! Obama because of a commitment to his biological father’s beliefs in anti colonialism is committed to the big idea of leveling America from a wealth standpoint so that Brazil, Venezuela and other small countries can thrive. Being a globalist, Obama trusts the institution of government as the means to equalize the world. He does not consider the impact on individual American lives, or even the life of America as a country. He is a global citizen, who is concerned about the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people.

Coming back around to why Obama is evil for destroying America, or Paterno is evil for hiding crimes to preserve the university, or Eichmann was evil for killing Jews, they all share in common a commitment to collectivism where their evil is justified by their dedication to making the greatest number of people happy. For Paterno, what made people the most happy, a football win on a cool Saturday afternoon against a Big Ten rival or seeing one of their beloved icons going to jail for raping little boys. The answer is in his actions, and because he tried to make people happy, they loved him for it—even to the extent of being in denial that one of their personal heroes committed evil.

Evil is seldom ever as pronounced as the villains we see in our movies and read in our books. It would be nice if they wore scary masks and spoke with sinister tongues so we could know that they are evil people. Hannah Arndt believed that she would see in Eichmann a monster during his trial, but instead she saw another human being eerily similar to herself, which was a frightening prospect. It’s frightening because we all want to know we’d be able to identify evil if it confronts us, and when people we think are good turn out to do evil, vile things, it leaves an unsettling feeling that disrupts our happiness greatly.

The unlikely indicator of evil is not to look for it in menacing social features, but in the actions of the people being observed. The chances are very great that if a person tends to serve institutions before their own interests, they have a tendency toward evil. If a person rationalizes the sins of singular acts by placing focus on a collective whole, then evil is the motivator. Evil lives and breathes in collectivism. Jerry Sandusky had a charity not for the sake of helping young men, but as a way to bring young men to his pedophilic desires. And Joe Paterno knew about Sandusky’s exploits and chose the happiness of the greatest number instead of rights of individuals. That’s why Joe Paterno is just as evil as Adolph Eichmann, or Barack Obama—because all these evil people seek personal redemption through collective salvation—which is the pathway to hell, paved with good intentions.

____________________________________________

This is what people are saying about my new book–Tail of the Dragon

Just finished the book and am sweating profusely. Wow, what a ride !!!  Fasten your seat belts for one of the most thrilling rides ever in print.

Visit the NEW Tail of the Dragon WEBSITE!  CLICK HERE!

Rich Hoffman
https://overmanwarrior.wordpress.com/2010/12/04/ten-rules-to-live-by/
http://twitter.com/#!/overmanwarrior
www.overmanwarrior.com