There is a Storm Coming: Lakota better have a boat

I think the best thing that could happen is that Julie Shaffer would lose her seat to a new school board candidate in this upcoming fall 2019 election. Jim Hahn is a potential for that, he’s running and is a business guy, and if the Lakota school board could pick him up and keep Todd Parnell, and Lynda O’Conner, there would finally be a three vote conservative presence that could avert the current levy plans that are in place for attempts beginning as early as 2020. If there is another tax attempt, I will say right now that I am all on board to resume the fight against it, and I understand that others are also interested. A gentle message to Lakota and all the real estate agents that spawn off the school system, there is a storm coming, so I hope you have built a boat, because the next levy attempt will be a bloodbath. The liberal activities of Brad Lovell Kelley Casper and of course Julie Shaffer along with the very disappointing sentiments that have evolved from the new superintendent Matt Miller, they have squandered a very good opportunity, a great budget with declining enrollment that has even further inflated the payroll for teachers who clearly aren’t worth the money, and they have been caught in gross mismanagement. The two conservative school board members have shown a bit of hope in properly managing the district, but the school board itself hasn’t gone far enough—the liberal activism is still a problem in the management of the government school.

I have no love for Julie Shaffer, we have a history together. When she couldn’t defeat my arguments back in 2012 she had to turn to identity politics to separate the No Lakota Levy group I represented for their 2013 attempt which they ended up winning by a very narrow margin. But it wasn’t Lakota who did anything to turn the tide, it was Sheriff Jones who wanted to put armed cops in the schools to protect them from mass shooters, or the potential. As it turned out, just as I said it would be, the whole thing was a scam, the money from the levy wasn’t used to cover cops or even security. Lakota did do those things, but ultimately the money was only to give teachers raises for their very high wages. My argument back then was that it didn’t bother me that Lakota had several teachers with six figure salaries, but that through collective bargaining the labor union wanted everyone to have those extraordinary salaries and back then the average wage was over 70K per year. We always hear stories about how low teachers are paid, well that’s not the case at Lakota, the teachers are well paid and the union props them all up and makes it nearly impossible to fire problem employees like the recent drama witnessed by the ex-Lakota employee, the transgender activist Emily Osterling. She sued the district for her proposed termination, and she won a settlement of $175,000 which the tax payers had to cough up ultimately.

Lakota is in my back yard so I want them to do well, but only until they become a pain in the ass in asking for too much money. I am proud of Lakota as long as they aren’t asking for money and by looking at their annual budget of over $220 million per year it is clear that the school board has not managed the money correctly. Now to their defense, the collective bargaining agreements by the union make normal value stream assessments nearly impossible. It takes three solid votes to really manage a district when there are five board members. It has taken a long time to get the two good ones that we have now and a lot of pushing and shoving. I have been asked many, many times to take on the job, but for my part, I have no desire to negotiate with a labor union all the time and I think the education system should be completely dismantled and recreated with a school choice competitive option. So its not a job for me, but we do need smart people who understand value creation to do the job. In that regard, there is an option in Jim Hahn.

However, the union vote will come out for their own preservation and they will vote this November for Julie Shaffer, so it will be a tough climb for Jim Hahn. He’s going to need some help and a good turnout. The union will not want him on the school board because they are against anything that does not stop the upward mismanagement of financial resources that are set to run out by 2023. Most of that $220 million budget is all in teacher salaries and that is just ridiculous. In an age where kids are learning more from hand held devices such as smart phones and personal computers, physical teachers are going the way of the drive-in. The test results just do not show that a teacher in the classroom make or break much in a student’s life. Most of the feel good stories are propaganda by the unions which young people are prone to be sucked in to, but are shallow in credibility at best. Just take a look at the Lakota website and their reported financials. They are short on substance but are flashy with surface points and comparisons to other districts who are every bit as much of a disaster as they are—because they are all driven by unionized employees hungry for inflated wages and as little work to do as possible.

The bloodbath that I am promising will be simple value stream analysis of what Lakota really does for our community, which is very little. The high school football games are only important to the students and their families, the other 100,000 people who live in the Lakota school system could care less and people like me without kids in the school system go through our daily days not even noticing the school buildings or their occupants. Life is busy and there is a lot for people like me to do that has nothing to do with the school system, and people like me are in the majority. All it takes is to get them to show up to vote, and they can easily out vote the union radicals which is why it takes Lakota an average of three levy attempts to get a tax increase passed. And to do that they have to resort to guerrilla warfare, not the goodness of people’s hearts. I would personally rather have the bloodbath rather than harm future business growth in our region with another Lakota tax increase, and argued that way, the way all businesses are measured, the story is quite clear. Lakota is not a value to our community, but a hindrance and the product they produce is failing and will continue to fail until the unions no longer run the government schools. That is, unless a third conservative is elected to the school board, and the budget crises that is coming can be averted. The value of the district won’t change but the bad reputation that will put Lakota through a lot of pain could be averted. And I would think that to be a good thing.

Rich Hoffman

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ: Understanding why America has a gun culture and to the level that it needs

Not that I ever questioned the meanings of our various constitutions, the United States one, and the one from my home state of Ohio, but it was good to read them anyway fresh off the calls for gun control that occurred recently in Texas and Ohio, even by members of the Republican Party. In some cases, it was even Trump supporters who were trying to justify new bans for “assault weapons” and mental health red flag laws. I’m glad that I particularly read the Ohio Constitution again because it is written so beautifully and is so clear on the matter. Guns were never gifted out by a nice government for target practice recreation. They are part of our constitutions both state and federal because there is likely going to occur many times in the history of our country a period where we would need guns to take back our government and instill new management. And with them controlling our military, people would need equal firepower to rise up against them and stop them. That is why there are 100 round magazines available for people to purchase and why there are silencers that sell next to beef jerky. Because we may need them to rip our government out of the hands of bad people and return it to a constitutional republic instead of some chaos driven democratic socialism that is hell bent on anarchy then total control of our way of life.

I am not one of those ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ types who are tattooing the words on my body or flying a flag in my garage warning off the government with the words “come and take it,” asking for a fight. The Greek phrase comes from the Battle of Thermopylae, which was recently popularized by the movie 300. It’s the battle where the Persian Empire of Xerxes was attacking Greece out of revenge for the previous defeat of a Persian emperor and they were met with a small force that did well as they were greatly outnumbered but ultimately fought to the death. Our modern equivalent to that statement and sentiment is “Remember the Alamo” for much the same reasons. In both of those cases the emphasis is on death and being outnumbered and I reject both of those ideas. In our present state, we outnumber them by a lot and I have no plans on dying. When you are better than they are, smarter than they are, and all other things are equal, why would we be the ones to die in such an engagement? So I am not one of those who use such phrases to articulate my position on guns. I’d rather them not come and try to take it because I wouldn’t want to hurt anybody.

However, what is being proposed by all sides of the political discourse on gun control as a result of these mass shootings is talk of government buy backs, and expanded back ground checks by the same government that obviously is doing everything it can to get rid of Donald Trump as president just aren’t on the table. For them to be we would have to trust our current government completely and just do whatever they tell us which obviously would be a dumb idea. I would argue that we are in a civil war right now. Donald Trump is the result of that war from my side against the government forces who have been making a joke of America for a long time. I prefer the election method as opposed to the armed opposition to something like what we have learned about the FBI, that they have been dirty cops picking winners and losers in the political theater, and they have been caught only because Trump was president. Many of us have known for a long time that such a thing was possible, but now we have proof. Gun control and more legislative turmoil isn’t even in the realm of consideration. We are one election away from open and hostile conflict similar to the first Civil War, the people against the government forces rather than North and South, so especially now, it is not the time to talk about gun control. We are presently fighting to keep our Republic intact from a socialist incursion. That is essentially the case of the mass shootings and why they are happening more often, the results of social decline similar to what we have seen in Venezuela. The gun violence is there to mask the Democrat failures just as Nicolas Maduro does in Venezuela.

It’s not that a liberal dog whistle was cast to inspire these Manchurian candidate type shooters to go on mass shooting rampages just hours a part in a period where Democrats are obviously losing in a big way to the Trump administration, and they needed to change the story. But all the kids who led these attacks are products of our liberalized public education system and are fringe leftists with limited intellectual development that I would consider deliberately functioning from clipped wings of brain development in our young people with bad educations, addictions to sex, and an over reliance on drugs, illegal and prescribed. Most of these modern victims won’t grow up to be mass shooters, but liberals know a certain percentage will, even if they don’t know them personally. It’s a numbers game and when those kids snap, Democrats are ready to make the tragedy an advantage for their side, and way too many Republicans are willing to share in the guilt and go along with the proposals to look like they are playing a bipartisan game. But its not about cooperation at all, its war and everyone knows that deep down inside. And if our government fails to protect our interests from internal domestic enemies, then we have to rely on our guns to hold our ground and take back what belongs to us—our country.

In my interactions with people, as I’ve said, I can read the Ohio Constitution or the federal Bill of Rights and understand the intent without a supreme court justice telling me what they mean. I get it, and I participate in the political system to keep the peace. I write on this blog and do many other things to do my part to keep things from getting out of hand, but to ensure that my side wins. And when I say my side, I mean the side of our founding documents and a rejection of progressive politics and the generalities of global liberalism. I also know that there are vast amounts of people who are tattooing ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ on their arms and across their backs and they mean it when they say, “come and take it.” Undoubtably when the police come to try to take their weapons away because they may be victims of some future “red flag” law they will turn them over without incident. But some of them will make the Waco incident and Ruby Ridge looking like a preschool coloring book project. There isn’t any outcome where America does like Australia or New Zealand, or anywhere in Europe and just gives over their guns and puts their blind trust into a government when we know better. Its just not going to happen.

What needs to happen as a result of these shootings is an educational issue, not a physical law that puts everyone back to sleep and gradually erodes the Second Amendment. Our founding documents specifically warn against just these kinds of intrusions on our liberties, especially by a political class that is so full of hatred and class warfare as the Democrats are. It was their activism that has turned up the pressure for which these shooters acted, whether we are talking about the psychedelic effects of marijuana legalization, broken homes where the mothers are married to government welfare checks instead of good, solid male role models, or failed liberal policies that have turned up the tension to the degree that potential mass shooters want to do something to help their “people” such as the Dayton shooter did. But their activism becomes our problem when one of these pimple-popping young people takes up guns and tries to kill a bunch of innocent bystanders. When that happens we have an obligation to stop them. And clearly the state is not equipped to protect us from such acts. We need expanded carry laws so that we can all defend each other on a moment’s notice. Because these killers are just getting started. I predict much more carnage rather than less, and the fault is in our education systems, not in the guns themselves. We have a failure of government and we are at a point where we need to replace it. We have taken steps to do so with Donald Trump. But that may not be enough. If that proves to be the case, we will need a lot more guns, a lot more ammunition capacity in our clips, and more power behind them.

Rich Hoffman

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Democrat Policies Have Caused Mass Shootings: If we have Red Flag laws are we going to arrest all of them as potential terrorists?

Ahead of President Trump’s visit to Dayton, Ohio the Democrat mayor of Dayton was very disingenuous toward his intentions and toward guns in general. Rather than talk about the victims and the circumstances leading up to the recent mass shooting she made an open pitch for gun control which would have done nothing to stop the problem. Rather, the shooter was from her own political party and actually was an advocate for gun control. The shooter didn’t really care to live, and he knew that if he did conduct a mass shooting that the debate on gun control would rage, largely by his own making. So it was rather astonishing that Governor DeWine surrendered so quickly to appease gun control advocates when it was really political radicalism antagonistic toward President Trump’s successes that caused the violence. Yet nobody covered that issue. A few reporters tried to get the Dayton mayor to say something about the political motivations of the shooter, but she ignored the questions and deferred. Meanwhile, most establishment Republicans did exactly what Democrats wanted them to do really without any reason whatsoever.

Now rather than talking about the cause of the violence, everyone is talking about “red flag laws” which is a very dangerous platform. In the future, no matter what they say now, once we accept that red flags brought up by friends, neighbors or family are a means for preventing crimes then we have essentially entered the realm of the “Minority Report.” It will be the next level of social control which Google and Facebook are already performing for the government with censorship and is a direct attack not just on the First Amendment, the Second Amendment, but the Fourth and Fifth. Red flag laws are an absolute abomination of American law and serve only one purpose, by giving government more control for which they don’t deserve.

There were plenty of red flags surrounding the life of Conner Betts, but our government didn’t act on any of them. There were plenty of people including many mainstream reporters who were interacting with his extreme liberalism on social media, and he had a history going well back to high school that showed a propensity toward violence. Yet there he was running around in the world planning a mass killing. The solution to him was to have more concealed carry holders there on the spot to kill him within the opening shots instead of waiting for the 30 seconds that it actually took for the police on the scene to engage him. Because it was a nightlife district, there were plenty of police there with guns, so the carnage could have been much greater. But it could have been reduced even more if the engagement was within 5 to 10 seconds. I have a few guns that I carry that would have stopped that guy with or without body armor, and to be honest, in a society like the one we have now where moral conduct has lost its grip, that is the only solution for the short term, until we can restore some structure to our society once again. But we are a long way from that. Until we deal with the real problems, more concealed carry holders are going to be needed in traditional gun free zones so that we can cut down the reaction time from when a shooter reveals themselves, to when they are stopped. If politicians, especially on the liberal side of things don’t want Wild West shootouts in our streets, then they should have managed their cities better.

The Dayton mayor really made me sick over these last several days of news coverage. We have been talking about how Democrats are ruining cities and Cincinnati and Dayton are certainly no exception. I like both of those cities, but the evidence of Democrat leadership is grossly obvious. Yet the mayor only wanted to talk about laws like red flag and how to keep CCW holders from expanding into day cares. As she spoke it took everything I had to keep from leaping into the TV to explain to her that if we truly did what she wanted the entire Democrat party would have to be red flagged, because their rhetoric and activism against the flow of the nation makes them all a menace. Are we really going to arrest them all and throw them in jail because they “might” do something illegal and against the safety of society in general?

All liberals want out of these mass shootings are more laws that they can use later to get more control over all of us. Red flag laws once started will then be used to attack political opposition just as Google and Facebook use them now to attempt to control the First Amendment. Democrats are seeking to attack the entire Bill of Rights and they aren’t shy about it. And for most of us, we should see that as an open assault. Democrats in general don’t care about the people who died in these tragic shootings, they only want to see how they can advance their cause on the backs of them.

In Chicago, which is an important story, over 1500 people have been shot so far in 2019 to the date of this article. Most of those shootings have occurred in the south and west sides, which is filled with years and years of socialist government experimentation. The results have been a completely failed society that is obvious from the air when landing at O’Hara. There were 59 people shot the weekend of the so-called mass shootings. 7 people actually died which is just as bad as the Dayton mass killings, but nobody is talking about that with equal vigor. That is because the cause of the shootings are the results of Democrat policies and social tampering. Guns are already illegal in Chicago yet they have no control as a police force of how to stop those killings which are happening every day. More laws won’t do anything to stop the problem because the causes are in education, social safety nets and their effects, low moral conduct—no dads in the homes, drugs, and poor economic outlooks. Neighborhoods that are poor have generally adopted socialist policies over the years pushing capitalism to the suburbs which cause bad options for jobs and micro economies. High taxes, high government tampering into investments, and government run housing that nobody wants to live in are all contributing factors. To fix all those things we have to admit that it is liberal policies that have failed. No new law can mask that.

It is good that at least President Trump gets it and he showed as much on his visits to El Paso and Dayton. The political class under him are still functioning from unearned guilt, but maybe they will follow his lead and stand up for themselves. Red flag laws are already in place, but what are you going to do when we have an FBI and CIA who see and monitor this activity but fail to act. Yet Alex Jones and many other conservatives are de-platformed off social media for uttering nothing even close to the kind of rhetoric that Connor Betts participated in leading up to the shooting. The lack of attention to his activity almost look as if authorities wanted him to commit a mass shooting so that more anti-gun legislation could be enacted. That isn’t the kind of thing many of us would utter in the light of day, but we all think it within the confines of our minds. And it isn’t Democrats that are changing their tune, they are demanding that Republicans change. That is outlandish because it is Republicans who are offering and have been offering solutions. Democrats have been making them, and their lack of responsibility in the matter is truly astonishing.

Rich Hoffman

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The Poker in Red Dead Redemption 2 Online is Great!

I had a nice talk with a friend recently while we were reflecting on the Tea Party days and the direction of today’s youth. By normal visual standards, the socialized instruction in public schools, and PC counterculture has everyone strapped to the body of Moby Dick at the end of that old story. And the drug use that has permeated everything that young people do, by conventional measure things look pretty hopeless. But two things happened over the weekend that I continue to be impressed with and they will certainly have an impact on how our culture is measured.

The first was a visit to Kings Island where the Festhaus was hosting a professional video game tournament. The place was packed to the brim and young people were everywhere and were quite happy competing on stage against each other with popular titles like Fortnite, and other video games that are part of a culture a lot of people over 30 don’t even understand. As I watched the activity I was thinking of a report that friend had said to me about Mason schools going even further into removing competitive events and statues from their public school—the everyone gets a trophy or none of them do type of thinking—and it was obvious that the politics might be moving in that direction. But the video game culture gets it. There are more opportunities for competition there than when I was a kid. Traditional sports are not the only ways to compete in life, or to learn to. Video games are all about capitalism and they are the preferred medium of young people’s entertainment experiences.

For instance, one of my favorite video games not just of last year, but ever is Red Dead Redemption 2. When that game first came out I was so excited about it that I took a week off work to play it, and for me it was a kind of vacation. It’s a western by Rockstar Games and for me it was like going to the West World of the popular HBO series. These video games are so immersive that they begin to simulate reality. They are different than the passive experience of movies so their impact on culture is something we just aren’t measuring yet. But in the case of Red Dead Redemption 2, it sold 24 million copies in just three days which amassed $725 million, and is still climbing. The earnings report for these video game companies are actually higher than many movie and television studios. Take-Two which is involved in Red Dead Redemption reported a Fiscal Year 2019 earnings report confirming so far $2.66 billion. Those are Disney type of numbers so this is not a market of entertainment that is obscure by any measure.

Red Dead Redemption 2 came out in October of 2018 and I played it several times a week through the turn of the year. I spent about a hundred hours playing it on story mode then I played the Beta development mode for the Online portion of the game. I had to capitalize that because their online concept for the game is a thing of itself. It’s quite an extraordinary attempt at hosting a very brutal and capitalist natured arena. In that meeting with the same friend we reflected on the near elimination of dodgeball from our society deeming it politically toxic. Dodgeball for us when we were kids was something that happened every day. Well for the kids of today, its these online arenas. A great video game must at least have online content where players can compete against each other in player versus player situations which are much more intense than dodgeball. The biggest difference is that one is virtual while the other was physical. But the mentality is the same.

I played the Beta for a while but I couldn’t give the game the kind of time it demanded to be good in that mode so I backed off and moved on to other things. Well, this past weekend Rockstar Games finally finished with their Online offering for Red Dead 2 and put it up on their latest update, which meant the official game went live, around six months or so after the original release, which of course keeps people buying copies of the game and keeping it going which is something to say about how video games tell their stories, over much longer periods of time than movies or other forms of entertainment. So I played the game again to see how things were going and was very happy and surprised to learn that the many bars of gold that I had during the Beta phase and all the money I earned carried over into the official release. And also I was very happy to learn that they had opened up the ability to play poker with other live players which is really the purpose of me writing this article. I was immensely pleased with the way the game was set up and I spent most of the weekend playing just that game mode.

I would not call myself a gambler or even a card player the way that people think of such things. I’m not a drinker, a womanizer or any of the things that are associated with the game of playing poker, which in my understanding of history has been advanced by socialists to attempt to demean the games of the Western frontier so that culturally people would be inspired to move away from those activities, so not to celebrate them. But I do love poker. I love watching it. I love playing it. And I love its history as an American game developed in the frontier days of New Orleans and spreading westward with the gunfighter culture. The game and the mind of gunfighting in the American West are synonymous and I love it for that attribute. Playing poker is a fun game that is uniquely very American, and I love it and including it so prominently in the online version of Red Dead Redemption was a technical feat that really impressed me.

Playing poker was part of the original game, the story mode as they call it these days. And I enjoyed it immensely. I am not the kind of guy who likes to gamble money so I’m not a guy who enjoys hanging out in casinos at all. But I do enjoy the function of the game and the way its played so just gambling the chips is enough for me. I like the way poker chips feel in my hands and how they are used strategically to win or lose the game. It’s a very fascinating game and I spent many, many hours playing it against NPCs in the story mode. But having an online poker game is a whole separate situation. You have random players always coming and going and everyone has to play their hand and getting all that rolled into a fluid video game experience is difficult. The way that Rockstar set up their poker games in actual saloons in their various towns and cities was visually stunning and functionally very satisfying. I played a lot of poker over the weekend and I didn’t even have to leave my home.

As I played and saw how many people were playing the Online Red Dead Redemption 2 game, from poker to all the PVP combat that is involved it was obvious to me that this is where the world is at. Many kids wouldn’t even learn how to play poker if not for a game like this, or would they learn anything about westerns since they’ve been nearly eradicated from American culture. But in the world of video games, the western is alive and well and millions of young people are participating in that world and enjoying it. And with billions of dollars at stake in this growing industry, I don’t think anything that is politically underway to dismantle the American way of life is going to stick. Capitalism is alive and well, especially in the saloons and towns of Red Dead Redemption 2.

Rich Hoffman
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If Trump Paid Zero in Taxes I would Respect him Even More

It’s interesting how new people come in and out of your life over the years and what they think of you as. A few decades ago if someone said bullwhips, my name was synonymous. Then it was my nickname of “Taxkiller” that carried with it a celebrity status that was inescapable, because of my work in reducing taxes in Ohio in the pre-Trump days of the presidency. And these days its more of a suit and tie relationship that I have that is a strange combination of guns, golf, and grandpaisms. Each decade had its own priorities and people come and go from your life, yet I have always been essentially the same person. But the world and the priorities of living in it do change and people do tend to define their memory of you based on some limiting definitions. In my “Taxkiller” days it was considered taboo to even talk about tax cuts, or in not paying them and I certainly did my part to change that culture for the better. Yet in all honesty, the moral conditions of taxation have always remained the same and the issue has returned to the surface now that congress has no other means of getting at President Trump but through the billionaire’s tax returns.

Paying taxes is like playing golf, which is why that game has sort of evolved into the game of the business person, the goal is to get the lowest score possible. Not the highest. To win at business and in life, you don’t want to over pay for things because to do so you are endorsing the value of it. Paying taxes means essentially that you are endorsing the way government spends money since they are the managing parties involved in the exchange. But we all know that’s not how it is, politicians are not good stewards of money and the only thing they really know to do is to ask for money like some chocolate bar obsessed child in a candy store always asking for more because they spend it like its going out of style. This is a well-known attribute in politics, that politicians do not spend money well, so it is inconceivable for a smart businessperson to throw money at those types of people knowing that the money will just be flushed down the toilet anyway.

What congress is trying to do to President Trump is hold the ridiculous position that there is some kind of moral rule that paying taxes is a duty to country and our system of government. So whatever is in Trump’s tax returns as a billionaire, which probably reflects the way the game is played in business, is to pay as little as possible, just like the game of golf requires the lowest score, the assumption of congress is that because Trump is rich, and because he sits in the executive branch that he is tied to some notion that government be fed tax money in measures of whatever they demand. And especially if you are rich, that a high percentage of that income be tossed to altruistic purposes that are managed by exactly the same kind of stupid people. Either way, the government view on taxes is to feed the machine infinitely and to like it.

My view on these things is that when you pay taxes you are endorsing the behavior of the management handling the money. If you continue giving government money they will grow proportionally. So if you are a small government guy, like I have always been—even from the time that I was a fetus—then paying more in taxes is an abomination. You should always seek to pay as little as possible, no matter how much money you make. I have been very active in the business world for all those decades mentioned above. Before the decade of my bullwhips I was known as something of a very reckless entrepreneur and I had a reputation for doing things that nobody else would even try. I was very young, something like 25 years old at the time—when I was in the Mayor’s office in Cincinnati working out solutions to complicated problems and I learned that the majesty of politics was simply left over garbage from our cultural inheritance from Europe, that it was too expensive and rather useless. The mayor at that time was the very liberal Roxanne Qualls so it didn’t take long for me to realize that all the tax money we would spend on people like her was just wasted anyway, so why should we work so hard only to throw it away on their governments. Not smart, so I learned very early to look at taxes as a waste of money and any intelligent person would always seek to pay as little to that vile system of government as possible.

I would be disappointed if Donald Trump paid too much on his taxes. It doesn’t matter to me that other presidents were elected but first submitted their tax returns. The only standard that measures is to what degree people blindly throw money to government, and very few prior presidents were like Trump, who came straight out of the business world. Measuring the value of a president based on his tax returns is one of the most ridiculous things I’ve ever heard. But in the case of congress it’s the only thing they have left to shoot after all their past efforts have failed against the President. However, and this is how it should be in all aspects of government, more businesspeople should be managing the money sent with taxes because the old system has failed. I didn’t just wake up one day and was known as the “Taxkiller.” My opinions about taxes formed over a very long period of time with great experience on the matter. And my books and other work that have taken me through other reputations were about themes formed while learning about how much waste government actually produces with our hard-earned money. I mean I like roads; I like the idea of an education—certainly not the way it’s done now—and I like police, military and even NASA. But not much else. Government wastes a lot of money and the more you know about the process the sicker you become about it. Any reasonable businessperson would find it reprehensible to consider how the IRS works as a strong arm of government to confiscate private property just to fulfil the spending zeal of the government. It’s a reprehensible process. So in business it is considered smart to pay as little as possible, because in over paying, you are essentially announcing to the world that you don’t know how to manage money. And in business management, that is the name of the game, not to overpay, but to keep costs down.

Who knows what other names I’ll be remembered for in the decades to come, but one thing will always be consistent for me, taxes are bad and inflate a government that I consider to be dangerous due to its size. I am proud to have a president who doesn’t think we should all pay the maximum amount of taxes as possible and that his means of generating revenue is in production. The world is a lot better with Trump in the White House. I don’t care if he paid zero in taxes over his past decades. It would tell me that he is as smart as I think he is. Only an idiot would think otherwise.

Rich Hoffman

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The NRA Meetings in Indianapolis–All is right with the world

It was a great day, the temperature outside was ideal, the sun positioned just right in the sky. I had met my family at Kings Island for dinner and to have some of their great potato wedges by the train at Rivertown. Then to end it all I was able to watch President Trump give a magnificent speech at the NRA Annual Meetings in Indianapolis. Additionally, a few days ago my latest edition of American Rifleman arrived in the mail and I was eager to read it, so I did as Trump gave his speech to cap off the evening. It was a version of a perfect day that was like a warm blanket to wrap in that let you know that all was right in the universe.

I can understand that a love for these kinds of things is regional, and traditional. I came from a family of farmers in a part of Ohio that is essentially the buckle of the Bible Belt. Everyone I ever knew had guns, shot guns, cleaned guns, and traded guns, so to me they are a fundamental part of American life. Critical even which is why liberals are so eager to get rid of them. If you want to redefine America and make it into something else, you must take away this whole concept of a 2nd Amendment. Liberals after all want more than anything to have a ruling class that centrally controls everything, and gun ownership is all about individual liberty. Those two things don’t go together. That makes it exceptionally joyful to have all those liberal elements removed if just for an evening so that you can just enjoy the things that make life better, and the culmination of the Trump speech in Indianapolis at the NRA event was just such an occasion.

Its one thing to be accepting of other points of view. Most NRA members that I know are very accommodating of other sentiments. Personally, I have been around the world more than once and know people from many countries and I understand their beliefs and cultures where guns are not part of their daily thought patterns. It is inherit in most cultures to believe theirs’s is the best based on their own point of view because they are functioning from a lack of knowledge which paints their world view. However, as I’ve said there is a right way and a wrong way of thinking. Not all concepts of thinking are correct or lead to a successful civilization. So my joy of the NRA events have more weight behind them than just hometown sentiment. If I’ve said it once I’ve said it thousands of times, guns in a culture are the means to freeing it from the tyranny of the mistakes that have plagued mankind from the beginning of time. They are a philosophic contribution to the mechanisms of freedom which ignite all culture as an original thought, not some reflective diatribe passed down through the ages. What is needed in all life-giving exercises is imagination and the platform to think freely. A culture of guns takes away the premise of oppression and paves the way for a mind not concerned about authority figures, but for its own survival and fruition, which therefore becomes the boost for cultural contributions. Therefor, the gun and the ownership of them are a basic epistemological necessity for any successful culture not living off its warlike past but building a bridge into the future with new ideas and approaches to the challenges of the universe.

They usually don’t explore these needs at the NRA events such as the one that President Trump spoke at. Mostly they tip toe around them and it comes out in their need to rebel against static government approaches to culture building. Slogans toward such efforts are sufficient to rally up the crowd but it is never really considered just how important guns are to the creation of a free society and that is where the real value of civilization resides most. It’s not the back in the train government types, Plato’s philosopher kings which universities promise you can be if only you pay over $100,000 in tuition to their liberal professors to get the Oz certificate that says you have a brain and therefore ruling power over the earth. In order for that scam to work guns have to be removed from society so that those types of people can then rule, and justify all the cost they spent to acquire that leverage. The hatred of the gun by such people traces back to their basic problem. The gun is the great equalizer and if all things are equal, those types of people just can’t compete in the world and that is their real fear. That’s why they want guns removed from society, so that their world view can have a chance. But they need the power of government to give them that leverage. They don’t get it from the natural world.

Trump is the right kind of president to have such a speech at just that type of event. Trump isn’t exactly the kind of conservative that was born in Ohio, he’s from liberal New York. Like a lot of people who are successful in life he has learned along the way what works and what doesn’t. Not all thoughts are equal, there are right ways to think and wrong ways, and through his life he has come to the right way of thinking. Because to be successful at life he has had to. There are liberals who have done well. They have managed their businesses conservatively and turn toward socialist action to prevent competition from nipping at their heels, but at some point in their life they had to think correctly about things to become successful. And that is Trump’s story. He wasn’t lucky like I was to get a head start in correct thinking by being born in a place where they had it right all along. President Trump had to get there on his own, which is a common occurrence for most aging people. There aren’t many people like Bernie Sanders out there who arrive at old age as bleeding heart socialists who just never learn the right ways of thinking in life. During the speech Trump announced that he was withdrawing from the UN Arms Trade Treaty which was a pretty big deal symbolically. Doing so assured an artificial value system from a global perspective would not be adopted in the United States, but that a recognition of gun rights would be solidified in legislative thinking which then would be implemented domestically. In short, we would rule ourselves as a country and not revert back to the Vico Cycle of global mess which is plaguing the world currently with all that hinders it.

As a gun owner and advocate I naturally have to spend a lot of time putting up with people who don’t yet get it, and it does wear you out. It’s not nice to rub people’s face in it, I think its good to let free minds be free, which means they need their time to come to the values of conservatism the way that Donald Trump obviously did over the years. Sometimes it takes them many decades to arrive there, but I believe in letting people figure it out on their own. If they want a guiding light, I’m happy to help them. But I’m not willing to yield value for conformity to a system of thinking that clearly is wrong in its foundations. So personally, an evening with President Trump and the NRA is a welcomed treat, a chance to be free of all the slow thinking dysfunction which swallows up so much global potential by following the paths of the past back into the hells of Dante. For one brief day and just a few hours at that, all was right with the world.

Rich Hoffman

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The Losantiville Dining Room at the Cincinnati Museum Center

I wouldn’t say that it was the fanciest room in Cincinnati or that the food was the best, although it was certainly good. But the meal I had recently at the new Losantiville Dining Room off the main rotunda at the Cincinnati Museum Center turned out to be my favorite dining spot in the southern Ohio area and was quite a treat. I had never been in that room before, even though the Museum Center is a place my family has gone often to over the years. There have a been a few times that I had been invited to fundraisers held in that room but didn’t quite make it, and other events, but I had always wanted to go inside. Now, after the two and a half-year restoration which just had reopened the museum known for its massive rotunda and murals part of their new restoration strategy was to making dining at the museum not such a cavernous exercise. Previously the only way to grab a bite at the Cincinnati Museum Center was to eat in the large rotunda that captures every noise acoustically known to mankind. It’s nice to look around, but not very relaxing. Opening up the new part of the museum to dining was a nice surprise for me, and to top it off, the food was good and the whole event very relaxing.

It’s taken a few weeks for it all to settle in. As has become a tradition, for my birthday this year my family went with me to a museum. Last year it was the Children’s Museum in Indianapolis, this year it was the newly restored Union Terminal in my home town of Cincinnati. We had taken the grandkids to the Children’s portion of the museum during the restoration, but not much else over the last two and a half years, and I had been missing it. I’ve spoken before about my love of the Natural History and Cincinnati History Museums that have always been a part of the Center. And I like the Omnimax Theater and occasionally enjoy a movie there. More than anything I enjoy the art deco style of architecture, the entire place reminds me very much of the great Ayn Rand literary classics, Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. So more time in those environments are nothing but good for me, and going there for my birthday with my family was something I knew I would enjoy. The surprise came from discovering the new opening of the Losantiville Dining Room.

The room is absolutely wonderful, the décor quite stunning. The room feels intelligent, and majestic. It’s the kind of place that I would just visit to grab a hamburger, not even to go to the various museums. It was a good move by the Museum Center to improve their dining options, and the food wasn’t overly expensive. It was nothing fancy, but the tater tots were exceptionally tasty, not sure why they were so good, but they were. I was happy to be somewhere comfortable with my family on my birthday where we could relax between all the walking around but I didn’t expect such a nice room. I am proud to say that my expectations of a good museum are the British Museum in London and The Louvre in Paris which I have attended while my hometown Museum Center was under renovation. While those big European Museums were bigger and had more to show, I don’t think for a second that they are better than the Cincinnati Museum Center. But certainly the food options which are important when you are at a place you plan to stay all day, is needed. For us my wife and I ended up eating outside at the British Museum and all that was offered were sandwiches and cold cuts. And I’ve reported my extreme displeasure at The Louvre’s lack of bathrooms and proper dining. They do have restaurant options, but the seating is terrible and crowd control atrocious—they behave like a socialist country, terrible service, terrible movement of people, and the efforts at imaginative offerings were despicable. I found it stunning that some of the best tourist attractions in Europe had such bad food offerings. Now I understand that food, especially big carb offerings are not European priorities. The people in Europe are smaller and skinnier than their American counterparts largely due to diets of excess which are common in the States. But for a global museum you’d expect more.

All the museums at The Museum Center were not even 100% yet, and still we arrived at the opening and were leaving as the place was preparing to close around 5 PM on a Tuesday afternoon. We were there a long time and during long visits like that food certainly becomes a priority. While the British Museum and the Louvre might argue that they are there to exhibit great works of antiquity and art, people get hungry and want to take a break. That is where the Cincinnati Museum Center has done so well. Even in the United States, the Field Museum in Chicago and the Natural History Museum in New York this Losantiville Dining Room is just a real treasure with now good food options and beer availability that sets it at the top of museum going experiences. I was even hoping for a better deal at the Children’s Museum at Indianapolis which turned out to be way too much cafeteria like in its approach. It wasn’t the kind of place that you’d want to buy a book in the gift shop and sit down there just to read it. But the Losantiville Room is just that, a place conducive to intelligent discourse, and it was built that way from the beginning as first a train station hold over room, which has evolved over the last century into a fine dining room.

Intelligent is the key word for the place, it was built as a testament to the best that the human race had to offer architecturally, and it fits well with the intention of museums as the most basic foundation of assumptions. I like a place that doesn’t insult your intelligence. Even at Jags in West Chester, I’m not a fan of the phony library look of some of the rooms. I like the intent, but it comes off as cheap to me, even though I enjoy eating at Jags quite a lot. I enjoy more a place like the Losantiville Room more even with the plastic chairs and standard tables to sit at. The room was intelligent and was far from phony, it wasn’t trying to be something that it wasn’t and I appreciated that. It was a great decision for the Museum Center to use that room for something other than occasional fundraisers. It was definitely a good idea to build off their natural assets.

I’m not a big fan of tax payer bailouts and the way that places like the Museum Center renovation was funded. Cincinnati as a whole needs to do a lot of things management wise to get better and to better distribute their revenue. But the Museum Center was certainly not a waste, they did the most with their money and it shows. It is certainly a treasure for the city and southern Ohio in general worth a trip from many miles around to attend. And honestly, I’d go to the museum now just to grab a bite to eat, just to sit in that room and relax. Just as it is nice to speak to intelligent people, it is every bit as nice to sit in places that exude intelligence and hope, and that is certainly the case at the Museum Center.

Rich Hoffman

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