House Bill 6 in Ohio is a Good Thing–if you want free markets, then provide them

There has been a lot of criticism about the passage of House Bill 6 which is the “Ohio Clean Air Program” because both sides of the political spectrum are missing the point. The bill essentially is a government bail out of the Akron-based First Energy Solutions nuclear power plants. The hippie liberal communist environmentalists don’t like that the bill strips away cash credits for “renewable energy,” such as wind power and solar while raising $200 million per year to cover the costs of the plants as a government heavy highly regulated industry that continues to lose money to the point where they won’t survive past the year 2021.

On the other hand there are the free market capitalists who don’t like that the utility company has donated over $1 million to Republicans to keep fossil fuel energy production alive, where the Obama era administrators sought to kill the industry in 2008 with more government mandates. Given the climate of government intrusion to begin with, and the need for good, reliable energy in Ohio, H.B, 6 further allows for local townships to vote by referendum any wind or solar powered take over of land and other assets to launch their “renewable energy” proposals, meaning the government can’t just decide to put up wind power plants by force. People in local areas would have the right to vote on them, which has the radicals infuriated. But equally infuriated are the capitalist who think that the whole deal is just another example of crony politics, where politicians will do anything for the donor base.

Here’s the deal, and I have been talking about this for a very long time, our utilities companies are monopolies that are directly attached to government management. And they shouldn’t be. If they weren’t “public” utilities then the management burden wouldn’t fall on government to have to solve, and Republicans in Columbus wouldn’t be tasks to bail them out or otherwise watch them fail down the tubes. And if the companies fail, what’s that do to our ability to produce nuclear power? Letting them fail at this point simply isn’t an option. And putting regulatory barriers on that industry just to facilitate hippie energy isn’t going to solve the problem either. What is truly needed in the long term are true free market solutions, which I suggested in Thorium, where every single home could generate their own power off a government regulated grid, kind of like how each home has their own air conditioning units. The technology is there, but government needs to get out of standing in the way of it, and when it does problems like what First Energy Solutions is going through would then become a private problem instead of a government problem. That is where the real issues reside.

The current state reality of energy creation is that it isn’t privatized, which by no coincidence is precisely why the health care industry is going through the same problem. If health care were privatized competition would bring down the expensive medications that are on the market. Government intrusion raises those cost and puts all the power in lobbyists. Until health care is privatized, costs will continue to be high and no easy solution for providing health care to people will be conducive to reality. Energy is hampered by the same restrictions. Power companies are government mandated monopolies, made that way through the incredibly high barriers of entry into the market. Regulator considerations destroy anything but the deepest pocket investors who then look to government to protect their investment. It’s much like the railroad situation at the turn of the 19th to 20th century. Someone had to build all those railroads, then someone had to manage the trains themselves and the people getting on them. Public utilities do great work, but they are expensive, and they are vulnerable to mass outages which hampers so many people because they must maintain and old grid of power supply that is in this present time old and obsolete.

But until we invent a better means of power generation, such as personal Thorium power plants the size of an air conditioning unit on a home for every home in the nation, government is stuck keeping the old dinosaur alive, which is what H.B. 6 in Ohio essentially is. The future of power generation isn’t the government mandates for solar and wind power plants passed down from the communist oriented Obama administration, its in private investment and personal maintenance, such as moving public transportation from the train to a car.

I love camping and always enjoy the sites of an RV park. Sure, while they are stationed in these weekend warrior hideaways, they are plugged in usually into the campground system of power and water maintenance. But in looking at all those great RVs within most of them are generators and tanks that allow them to function independently while traveling along the vast highways of our nation. It is from them that we should be learning how to push technology into each of our homes and businesses with more independent power generation and to get there we need to allow competition into the public utilities, which of course they don’t want, but that is the ultimate solution. We have allowed government to stand in the way of that energy independence so we really shouldn’t complain when they are called on to manage the trouble.

In that regard I completely support the Republican position on H.B. 6 and the Governor DeWine’s reasoning on the matter. They are dealing with dinosaur technology to supply the energy needs for a sustainable Ohio. The goal thankfully isn’t to pander to the flimsy hopes of the environmental terrorists, or the communist desires to destroy capitalism in the United States through heavy regulations tied to the backs of “Green Energy” but to deal with the two nuclear power plants that we do have, which have already cost a lot of money and do employ a lot of people. We need to use the energy we do have to bridge us into a 21st century solution. Likely the utility companies won’t like that solution but that is a bridge to cross when we get there. But we do need to get there.

Independent energy has to be the answer for the future, and free market competition to bring down the costs. Government needs to be out of all these economic transactions so that real free market solutions can come about, just like it did when the telephone utilities were deregulated. That is how the cell phone came about. Imagine what would happen if utilities were deregulated to allow for new methods of power generation to emerge. It amazes me how good some of the RV power generation innovations are these days. Imagine what it would look like if every home in the nation had their own source of power. Think of the lack of destructive impact to any economy that happens during every major storm where power grids get knocked out and hundreds of thousands of people are out of power for days, putting many people at risk. The option could be that every home treated their power supply like they do their air conditioners or heating services. A few downed trees wouldn’t kill the power for several neighborhoods. Instead one or two homes might be affected who could solve their problem with a simple service call from a competitive repair person. If we really want free market conditions, then let’s get government out of the utilities market and put them in the hands of the private sector.

Rich Hoffman

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The Great Trump Poker Game

In case you haven’t heard, there are even more text messages between Lisa Page and Peter Strzok that show directly that the Clinton campaign was involved in the FBI cover-up of DNC tampering into the 2016 election which Donald Trump won anyway. But now the skin is off the cat and its quite serious. It doesn’t seem that way to the mainstream media outlets because largely they refuse to cover it, but people like James Comey Clapper, Brennan and many, many others involved directly with the Obama White House are in deep trouble, and they deserve to be. It’s getting worse for them week by week and is why they came out against President Trump from day one, because they feared this day, where they no longer controlled the flow of information in government and could be tied to many crimes they knew they had committed to stay in office against the wishes of an official election. Meanwhile the state visit of the Trumps to Buckingham Palace in London was something even the most cynical person against Trump should have been very proud of. For those who have always supported Trump, it just made us prouder of his presidency.

What makes the Trump’s so good at these oversee visits with rulers, kings and queens of the world is that they’ve been there before. Long before Trump became president, he had become the very definition of the rich and famous, so looking comfortable among the most elite of the world is nothing new to him. And Melania is just such a great first lady, always looking and acting like the best that America has to offer. I can’t think of a single Democrat or Republican who could pull off one of these visits with the Queen of England so well, as if it was second nature to Trump. Which of course it is. I mean before the White House he and Melania actually lived in a tower of gold named after him. That lifestyle has certainly put him at ease in events like this one in London and I am personally glad. His approach certainly represents the way I think America should sell itself to others. Not just as an equal partner, but as a respected leader of the world and something others should feel a need to live up to.

But that is also why there was so much opposition against Trump to begin with. For many decades the plan was to diminish America’s role in the world and to cheapen our leadership in every way possible. So when we elected Trump to the Presidency the powers that had been engaged in all this diminished activity were inflamed to protect what they had been destroying. They certainly didn’t want Trump to repair our status around the world, which is precisely what has happened. Do you want to know how you can tell that Trump is unbeatable in 2020? Just look at how he has been playing the game. If his presidency were a poker game, which I’d say it is, he held great cards from the beginning, and now that the River has been revealed he has a 100% chance of winning the hand and the massive pot in the middle. The reason is that the Democrats went all in with what they thought were great cards, even cards they stuffed up their sleeve. But Trump had the aces and during the flop two more aces were revealed along with a King a Queen and a Jack. The King was the Mueller investigation, the Queen was the Strzok and Page FBI text messages, and the Jack was the phony Russian dossier paid for by the Never Trump establishment helped along by the Republican John McCain. And the other two Aces were the tax cuts and the great economic numbers that came from Trump’s policies. The two Aces Trump had all along were his great ability to lead people and generate excitement wherever he went, and his ability to be independent of the stuffy establishment with his own personal wealth.

Trump always had a great hand but once the Mueller Report was finished and the economy was continuing to truck along boldly, there wasn’t much anybody playing the game against Trump could muster. They had nothing and what’s unusual about politics played at this stage is that Trump knew how to play the game all along without all the advisors who whisper in the ears of leaders and usually guide everything in the direction they desire—who are completely controlled by establishment objectives. That made Trump a very unusual political figure, and one who couldn’t be beaten playing the game conventionally. And Democrats don’t have a candidate on the horizon who can match him.

That seemed to be the understanding of the English who finally did this state visit and put forth all the pomp that would be expected by such an occasion. When Trump was first elected, I was in London and saw how the local news had been covering him. I was at Big Ben and saw the massive protests around it trying to steer English politicians away from embracing the new American president. So, no doubt, the Queen waited to see how things went, so no immediate plans for a state visit were entertained. Now, two years later, as all the gas has gone out of the opposition forces, Trump is going to be around for a while, so the English might as well embrace it, so that had even a bit more sauce for this fine meal. Capitalism was making a comeback and any world leaders who didn’t want to be left behind understood that they needed to make friends with this American president, which is why the smartest of us elected him. We were tired of the bowing and apologizing that had been going on and decided to take matters into our own hands, and Trump was a great hire.

Personally, I was very proud of the Trumps at Buckingham Palace and the performance of the whole family on that very important trip. Even while the theater of pomp was in full bloom, the Russians called Trump up to indicate they were withdrawing their support from Venezuela. Mexico was reeling from the proposal of new tariffs, which will cripple their already deficient economy, and China is being bent over backwards from the tariffs that are now in place and is really bringing much needed pain to their economy. Its good to have an American president who understands the Chinese book on strategy, The Art of War. Finally! It’s not hard to beat them at their own game, we just need people in leadership positions who get it, and Trump does. There is just so much to be proud of even the biggest Never Trumpers that there are realizing that their efforts are futile. Trump has all the good cards in this game and he knows how to use them, and the best thing that everyone could do is to fold, before they lose everything. The Queen of England knows the story and she was very gracious in receiving the Trumps. They may not be her cup of tea, literally. But she is a smart woman and she knows how to play the game too, and for her and everyone, that means giving Trump credit for getting this far and still having Aces. Most of the chips on the table are on Trump’s side of it and as an American, that’s what I expect to always see.

Rich Hoffman

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Politics and the Banned Books of the Bible

I think the most interesting thing in the world is not how we all evolved out of some single celled creature swimming in the sea, or were molded literally out of dirt by a god and cattle prodded into existence while mating with our brothers and sisters, but in why mankind has a perpetual need to regress. And that is the trend if you look back over the many years to the beginnings of things. For instance, even while we may marvel as I have at the antics at Stonehenge and Avebury in England the Egyptians and Sumerians were conducting life not so different from our modern day needs and desires in America. Then visiting those same places today, the Middle East has not progressed from accomplishment to accomplishment always building higher, but is now considerably less sophisticated and much less economically viable. Places around the world do not evolve at the same rate, while one part of it may be on the cutting edge of technology the other parts of it has clans of rock throwers and superstitious psychotics sacrificing their first born daughters to some gods hoping to make it rain so they don’t all starve to death.

Then there is the problem as to why we desire to hide that reality from ourselves behind veils of culture, religion, economics, even history. One thing that has always really bothered me about the Bible in the Christian tradition is that the book was essentially conceived around 100 AD, a century after Christ had died. A few hundred years after that the Roman emperor Constantine wanted to unite his empire using Christianity as the glue so the first Bibles were organized and over the next several hundred years scriptural scholars decided what books to put in the Bible and which ones to leave out. For instance in the days of Jesus he was known to have been well versed with scripture, but what scripture are we talking about if the nature of the Christian religion in the New Testament is all about him. The Old Testament had been picked through by so many “authorities” that it really doesn’t hold any historical reference any longer. The scripture that Jesus had studied is obviously long, long gone. There is a long section of Biblical history that is just ignored, especially if you go back and read the banned books of the Bible, the Book of Jasher, the Book of Enoch, and the Book of Jubilees.

For all we know the ancient books of the Bible were passed down for millenniums and mankind had been coming and going for all that time scratching at the surface of civilization while continued pockets of failures went back to being spear chuckers and forgetting about the massive ziggurats they had built with great effort to satisfy somebody somewhere. That span of time could have been three of four thousand years to tens of thousands of years. Yet if you go to the National Geographic Museum in Washington D.C. they will insist that all over the world we all developed as hunters, then planters, then city builders to where we are today. But then using modern science to peer back under the veil of history we see that all over the world, especially in regions today that we might call “third world” we see the evidence for massive lost civilizations that just don’t follow that assumption. All along the Amazon River we see evidence of major cities buried under the jungle canopy waiting to tell us their stories that occurred long before the Inca were even thinking of building their empire in South America.

We are learning that the Maya were much older and much bigger than we ever thought they were. What we know about all these cultures is really only captured in stone and stories. How much truth is there in the myths of all world cultures and how much of it is made up fantasy to represent metaphorically a need that minds had, like the modern myth of Star Wars. There are deep human needs in most mythologies that are revealed in those stories, but how much of them are truth and how much based on desire? All we really have are guesses and deduction from looking at some pottery and making assumptions based on our modern life. How many Göbekli Tepe temples are there buried under a hill in Turkey out there all through the Middle East and extending into Asia, even North America? The date for that location is well accepted now by mainstream science to extend back to the 10th millennium BCE which would indicate that life there was an advanced culture in the area of the Biblical regions well before the Temple of Solomon was built, or the City of David had laid its first stone. We tend to walk the streets of Jerusalem and think of the Old City as…..old. But when you consider the evidence of Göbekli Tepe as being five to perhaps even ten thousand years older it makes you wonder how many other places around the world might view Göbekli Tepeas the newcomer.

I grew up with Bible study, my family attended church often and I enjoyed learning about religion in the Christian context but as I grew older I started studying comparative religion and wondering about how so many different versions of the same stories percolated out into our nation building. Then I couldn’t help but wonder how much of our myths and legends were actually true, how much of the tall tails were in all actuality laced with fact. And by just a casual observance you learn really quick that most of the governments of the world do not want to know the truth. And they will actually use violence to keep anybody from discovering our true historical context to the distant past. Every culture wants to think they are the first to arrive at some grand conclusion and are therefor the authority to follow. But in reality, they are just the latest, many have tried before and that will continue well into the future. My question is and remains, how do we stop the cycle?

I have some pretty good ideas on the matter, and I have my thoughts on the past and the future that I have discussed in some detail. My interest in politics and economics have spawned off this basic question as to why societies rise and fall so often and unlearn everything they worked so hard to develop. Is this the first time for instance that a world culture has developed the means to leave the planet and head to space? I don’t think so. In the politics of Democrats for instance I hear in them a deep yearning to crawl back into the cave and to paint images of a deer hunt onto the dark walls of Lascaux. Even among most Republicans is the desire to use capitalism to advance mankind into a hopeful future of discovery and triumph, but while hanging on to parts of Biblical history that insist they were the first and only attempts at civilization and that we not deviate from the pages of a book built by the Roman Empire to control their territories. To my study nobody really wants to “get it” and that is the biggest mystery of all, and something that deserves some consideration. Because in that answer is a treasure trove of understanding that holds a key we all could benefit from. And it only takes a little courage to unlock.

Rich Hoffman

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The Hope of Comics

Even though it’s not why I do it, because in the beginning I considered this blog to be a fun extension of my life and my many interests, it has become something bigger and much more literate. And with that come judgments from people who just aren’t very intellectual presently, or perhaps never will be which I consider worthless. The difference between me writing these many articles for myself, which I have for many, many years and sharing them in the form of a blog is that in the back of my mind I hope to help people realize that there is more to life than what they are presently living. I think by any measure I am a very well-balanced person and an excellent thinker. True, I could be another Alex Jones, I certainly have interests in that direction, but I could also be a sports star, or any number of things. But what I am is a lot of things and I like it that way. And I share those things with my audience purely for the sake of their own uses, certainly not mine. What I do for myself is know that I am trying to help people live better and more authentically, and when the refusal of that offer is openly rejected I do get mad about it. I don’t force people to do anything and they certainly shouldn’t expect such a thing from me. The things I do object to in life however is anything that leads to below the line thinking and when I see such a thing I do get pretty vocal about a need to rebel against it erupts. But sometimes even for me the disappointments about how people choose to live and paint themselves into a corner gets to be too much and on those moments I give myself a breath by going to my local comic book store.

As I’ve said before, I like every sport there is. The reason I didn’t enter professional sports as a young person was that while I liked the objectives of winning, I didn’t like the compliance of building a team. I always related more to the coaches than the players and the elements of leadership so sports took up too much time and there were too many social stigmas about what success or failure meant and I had other things I wanted to spend time on. But I’m certainly not one who is an either or person, either the life of a jock or the life of the geek who hangs out in comic book stores avoiding life while others chase balls around and get headlines in the newspapers because of it. Those divisions were always absurd to me and still are. I enjoy reading all types of things, including comic books. They are usually full of ambition and the artwork is usually very energetic.

So it was with that zeal that my oldest daughter, my youngest grandson and my wife went to two comic book stores on Saturday which was a combination of Star Wars day and free comic book day. What I really wanted was the new comic about the new Star Wars land at their theme parks called Galaxy’s Edge. I’ve always been a Han Solo guy so I am quite excited that the plot of the new land was featuring him and that it was highlighted in the new comic, and I wanted to get it. I can’t recall the last time a theme park decided to tie modern mythology in this way and I found it very interesting. So for the history of it I wanted to collect it for reflection 50 or 60 years from now in the future. I was also curious how Disney would attempt to tie all these media platforms together into a big unified story.

Much to my surprise they were sold out of the Galaxy’s Edge comic that I wanted at the first comic store, but otherwise it was a very bustling place. I didn’t see any kids there, but a lot of adults and they were all talking quite vibrantly about various comics, the recent Game of Thrones episode, the Avengers climax with Endgame and the upcoming Cincinnati Comic Con which my other daughter is planning to attend as an exhibitor. I couldn’t help but wonder if Socrates ever thought for a second that any culture on earth would have so much mythology produced and that people would gather in a comic book store to talk about them with such passion. I am encouraged by such places, they often restore my thoughts that people are worth saving when I read comics and see the bold desires there that are unfurled by obscure artists revealing their hopes and dreams through fantastic characters that are translated onto colorful pages full of art. There was more art produced just in that one comic book store than the entire Renaissance period of Europe, which I think is every bit as good.

We ultimately had to go to a comic book store in Mason to get my Galaxy’s Edge comic. I picked up far more than I had planned to and I enjoyed reading them later while I watched the Reds game on television and for me, all was right with the world. But more than anything I enjoyed the people. There were a lot more people participating in the free comic book day events than I would have thought which led to a lot of contemplation for me. My daughter and I discussed it over lunch. Her generation has grown up in a lot of hapless situations. The political system has let them down, their educations were a joke, their parental structure often broken. It was in their last hopes for participating in mankind that they go to the comic book store looking for heroes to believe in. Some people would say they were escaping from reality, but what I saw was that it was for their own good. Their love of comics was a survival mechanism to the disappointments of life and I saw in all those people a desire to not just accept a “bla” existence, but to at least learn through the mythology of fantasy characters that there was more to the human experience than just accepting defeat then eventually death.

To say I’m excited about Disney’s new Galaxy’s Edge would be a severe understatement. I read the comic pretty much in the car on the way home because I couldn’t wait to see how everything would be tied together and I was happy with the ambition of it all. I personally needed the break in thought myself. For me it’s never about going backwards. When I get disappointed in the ambitions of the human species, I too look for reasons to feel good about it all again and comic book stores do it for me. They are filled with hope not just in the artists who produce the content, but in the participants. In all their geekdom, they are essentially out for the same thing that the baseball player is, or the golf enthusiast, or Fantasy Football player, everyone wants a win. And if there are things that comics are typically selling, its victories of the human soul overcoming adversity. And unfortunately for most, such concepts are a fantasy. But at least they haven’t lost sight of the need for such a thing.

Rich Hoffman

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Golf and Guns

My problem in the world is that I enjoy too many things. But to be successful, traditionally, we have a culture that values specificity, where we immerse ourselves into one particular thing. For instance when it comes to this blog site, there is a political context and a narrative that has to be fulfilled for it to work. And since my audience is largely Trump supporters and Second Amendment advocates, going off the rails too far on a tangent doesn’t fulfil that market necessity. So I talk about guns and my love of Cowboy Fast Draw a lot as opposed to other kinds of sports, like baseball and golf. But to my mind they are all the same. In fact, I view Cowboy Fast Draw as another kind of game not at all unlike golf or bowling. We make games at life to represent our culture in various ways and to me they are all the same. The gun and their use is purely a sporting activity and are directly applicable to other sports. Truth be told, I enjoy every sport though. When I go to a sporting goods store, I am absolutely in heaven because every section is something I enjoy. I love baseball, I love football, I love the outdoor section, I love soccer, golf, I love everything. And to me they are all one big story.

I do resent being put into a classification with people who are limited in their scope of enjoyment of life though. I understand their limits and I hope that at some point they overcome them, but it certainly isn’t my task to yield myself to their handicaps. This is an issue that has come up more than once recently among several people. A politician friend recently asked me to take them out of a video they appeared in many years ago because their life had changed and they now had a much higher social profile, and political enemies were using it against them. One of the weapons that was used against this person was that I am a “gun advocate dressed to kill” which is shown on this blog site quite audaciously. But that’s not how I see it. To me a gun and holster rig with the gunfighting garb of Cowboy Fast Draw is no different from a group of people hitting the golf course with a dress code that would otherwise be laughed at during a visit to any local mall. Or a baseball player stepping off the field and without changing going to a nice restaurant. The baseball outfit would be considered odd in any other public setting except for a game. So the gunslinger outfit to me is something of an American heritage, no different from the Japanese reverence for their samurai or some other warrior reference that a culture wants to remember honorably. If you take away the politics all these sports are fun and have their place and I enjoy them all.

I was thinking about all this while I was looking for a nice golf bag and I found one, a really cool red, white and blue patriotic golf bag that I thought was really cool. Then I found a great baseball bat that was all decked out in patriotic colors, and so it went for several hours that day, I had a great visit to the sporting goods store. But I was also thinking about the objectives of those games and how they fit culturally into our society. And also specifically, they have a very unique style of dress for each of them. Something we have culturally come to accept. Except somehow the way I dress on this blog site was considered by some to be politically dangerous, and divisive. But the game of golf wasn’t? Both sports had the object of hitting targets. In shooting there are obviously targets to hit and you are measured by your success or failure in hitting them. And in golf the whole point of the game is to hit the target in as few strokes possible. Where is the problem with guns, other than they have been made politically volatile by a political class that has sought them out for their own purposes? In America guns are a sport like any other sport and I am personally offended that its even an issue.

One of my very good friends, an old radio guy, who was very talented had to completely erase his social media imprint into saving the Republic of America, which he felt very strongly about. But to work for this company they made him make a choice. A six-figure income or he couldn’t be promoted into this new position and as I held that American flag baseball bat I couldn’t help but think of how dangerous that offer really was. I understand the decision he made; he picked the money. A lot of people would. I obviously haven’t. I’ve had similar offers and I picked the blog, my books, my guns and the generalities of my life because in the end those are the things that the people who really matter to me care about. But such a choice should never have to be made, and honestly, we have been stupid as a civilization to let people make such divisiveness over anything, especially among our sports.

A visit to a sporting goods store shows just how rich our American culture is. I’d love to explore them all but unfortunately there is only time for a few of them. However to allow politics to ruin any of them is what I consider reprehensible. To allow a censorship of some with an emphasis on others is a further hypocrisy. Golf especially in the business world is considered a game for upper management, and I can see why. The goals of the game are very similar to those in the business world. Get to the goal in the shortest way possible using the various tools in your golf bag to get there. We don’t think about the people who actually kill other people with golf clubs every year when we play the game even though often the number is higher than with rifles. Yet liberals want to ban rifles and the game of golf is promoted, especially in business as if the two were radically different. But they aren’t different. Both sports, guns and golf are all about hitting targets. Both represent aspects of culture that are valuable and metaphorical, yet one is attacked and one is supported and that standard is very hypocritical.

I think we should enjoy everything, and I do. And I personally resent any judgments cast against me when what I do is part of the sport of shooting. The views that I value about an America that predates this liberal censorship trend that is going on in our media, companies and our politics is dangerous. That it is even considered radical to proudly display a gun rig that I am very proud of is a disgrace. Now if I was in a picture with that new golf bag which would cost about half as much as the gun and the holster rig then the world would be happy. That is not how things should be and it’s a shame we’ve let it become that way. I’m certainly not going to change the way I do things, but it’s a shame that so many people are forced to, just to fulfill a social norm that has been shaped by anti-American forces. It is my assertion that we shouldn’t have such limits.

Rich Hoffman

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Yes, I like the $2 Trillion Idea of an Infrastructure Plan–but only on one condition

I personally don’t have a problem with the proposed 2 trillion-dollar infrastructure conversation that President Trump had with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer. In the great chess game, it shows bipartisan effort and puts the need on the table for discussion the way it should be. The problem I do have is who and how we pay for such a thing with our current debts well into the 20 trillions now. However, we are the best economy in the world. The United States is the destination of hope for the world, so our roads, bridges and other aspects of infrastructure should reflect those attributes. When you land at an airport anywhere in America, it should be more like Orlando and less like La Guardia—which is to say—a tired old arm pit well past the need for care. Orlando is vibrant and new, reflective of the massive wealth generated there by tourism. La Guardia reflects the results of socialism that have crept into the New York area over the years.

I know a lot of politicians and it continues to be a common occurrence that they ask me to run for something in my local community, because they know professionally that I am good at what I do, especially in the context of management. They know as do I that most of government ends up with the worst manager types that our human civilization produces. Mostly they are idiots who couldn’t manage a McDonald’s let along $200 to $500 million in annual sales. For me the private sector is a lot more rewarding, especially if you don’t care about the thrill of winning a popularity contest every four years or so. That kind of thing isn’t for everyone, so we tend to do what we are good at, and politics formally is not one of my dreams. And I’m certainly not alone in that, many feel just as I do. A nice lady just a few days ago asked when I was running for president and I simply told her that I viewed politics as a possible retirement job. I’m still young, so I wouldn’t dream of such a thing at my age. Maybe when I’m in my 70s or 80s. But not now. And in that regard, I can certainly understand Donald Trump who did exactly that. He made the presidency his retirement job. There is far more power in building an economy than in managing the table scraps that are taken from it in the form of government. And government doesn’t build economies. People do.

Thinking of the $2 trillion price tag for Trump’s infrastructure plan makes sense if the culture that is paying the bill has something above a 6% quarterly growth of GDP, which I think is very possible. We are at just under 4% right now with the Trump deregulation and tax cuts that have been initiated. Getting barriers from holding back our economy is the way to get to those kinds of numbers. If growth is paying down the national debt and covering infrastructure, then so be it. I’m happy to indulge. But the bad management of particularly the Democrat party likely just won’t get their arms around that kind of utilization of resources and their way of paying for it will likely include higher taxes and more regulation which will kill any such bill in the Senate until after the 2020 election.

I personally think we can get to over 10% GDP growth if regenerative medicine, hyperloop technology and the commercialization of space are unleashed over the next three years. New markets emerging with explosive job growth, that will far outpace the supply of human labor are the only ways to really pay for $2 trillion in improved infrastructure and those opportunities are before us right now. The human capital problem isn’t really an issue either as robots and artificial intelligence is coming about to fill many of those jobs in the expanding economy. Yes, we’ll continue to have low unemployment, but there will still be millions of jobs created that have to be filled by something, and robotics will be the answer, even if that makes traditional market watchers anxious.

All the ingredients are there to make a 2 trillion-dollar investment into American infrastructure, the problem is who manages all this, the government or the private sector? You don’t get to that kind of growth with more government. You only get there with more market expansion from the private sector. As I said, government tends to bring about the worst managers that there are. The good managers stay in the private sector, unless like in Trump’s case, they are doing the job as a retirement gig. I know personally how much effort goes into the management of industrial resources and in my vast experience with government types, they ain’t doing it. So that is the problem, not in having the ability to do it, but who will do it. This is essentially why socialism always fails. The current situation in Venezuela is just such an example. We are supporting as the United States the removal of a communist, but what will replace him is a socialist, so the people of Venezuela don’t really have a shot at any kind of good government in the foreseeable future. And their culture has run off all the great intellectual aptitude by way of management because government has long ago taken over their industries leaving inept people to run those companies into the ground for nobody’s benefit.

That vast stupidity is also reflected in Joe Biden’s presidential race announcement where he stated that the labor unions built the middle class. Biden is a great example of a government type who is a terrible manager. He doesn’t have even basic understandings of cause and effect and is therefore paralyzed into making even fundamental management decisions. Any CEO of a major company could do his job but Biden could not run even a small company with a staff of ten people, because he doesn’t understand the basics of a management concept. For most in government their entire management plan is to take more in the form of taxes and spend it on their promises they made to get elected. But they never understand that their interference in tax collection halt the growth of an economy, so they are perpetually looking to blame someone, anyone for their failures, just as bad managers in any field do often.

In its current form this infrastructure plan will die in the House and Trump will be able to say he at least listened. But between you and me dear reader I’d actually like to see it happen. Not with Democrats running the House of course, but it would be good to push for 8% to 10% GDP growth in emerging technologies and to see those improvements end up in our roads and bridges. I like shiny new things as much as anybody, but it can’t be built off debt, it needs to be built and reflective of actual growth. If that’s what it takes to get the $2 trillion into those projects, I am happy to support it. Excited even. But the basic assumptions of management must be considered, government isn’t capable. The only thing they can do to help make that happen is to get out of our way.

Rich Hoffman

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The NRA Meetings in Indianapolis–All is right with the world

It was a great day, the temperature outside was ideal, the sun positioned just right in the sky. I had met my family at Kings Island for dinner and to have some of their great potato wedges by the train at Rivertown. Then to end it all I was able to watch President Trump give a magnificent speech at the NRA Annual Meetings in Indianapolis. Additionally, a few days ago my latest edition of American Rifleman arrived in the mail and I was eager to read it, so I did as Trump gave his speech to cap off the evening. It was a version of a perfect day that was like a warm blanket to wrap in that let you know that all was right in the universe.

I can understand that a love for these kinds of things is regional, and traditional. I came from a family of farmers in a part of Ohio that is essentially the buckle of the Bible Belt. Everyone I ever knew had guns, shot guns, cleaned guns, and traded guns, so to me they are a fundamental part of American life. Critical even which is why liberals are so eager to get rid of them. If you want to redefine America and make it into something else, you must take away this whole concept of a 2nd Amendment. Liberals after all want more than anything to have a ruling class that centrally controls everything, and gun ownership is all about individual liberty. Those two things don’t go together. That makes it exceptionally joyful to have all those liberal elements removed if just for an evening so that you can just enjoy the things that make life better, and the culmination of the Trump speech in Indianapolis at the NRA event was just such an occasion.

Its one thing to be accepting of other points of view. Most NRA members that I know are very accommodating of other sentiments. Personally, I have been around the world more than once and know people from many countries and I understand their beliefs and cultures where guns are not part of their daily thought patterns. It is inherit in most cultures to believe theirs’s is the best based on their own point of view because they are functioning from a lack of knowledge which paints their world view. However, as I’ve said there is a right way and a wrong way of thinking. Not all concepts of thinking are correct or lead to a successful civilization. So my joy of the NRA events have more weight behind them than just hometown sentiment. If I’ve said it once I’ve said it thousands of times, guns in a culture are the means to freeing it from the tyranny of the mistakes that have plagued mankind from the beginning of time. They are a philosophic contribution to the mechanisms of freedom which ignite all culture as an original thought, not some reflective diatribe passed down through the ages. What is needed in all life-giving exercises is imagination and the platform to think freely. A culture of guns takes away the premise of oppression and paves the way for a mind not concerned about authority figures, but for its own survival and fruition, which therefore becomes the boost for cultural contributions. Therefor, the gun and the ownership of them are a basic epistemological necessity for any successful culture not living off its warlike past but building a bridge into the future with new ideas and approaches to the challenges of the universe.

They usually don’t explore these needs at the NRA events such as the one that President Trump spoke at. Mostly they tip toe around them and it comes out in their need to rebel against static government approaches to culture building. Slogans toward such efforts are sufficient to rally up the crowd but it is never really considered just how important guns are to the creation of a free society and that is where the real value of civilization resides most. It’s not the back in the train government types, Plato’s philosopher kings which universities promise you can be if only you pay over $100,000 in tuition to their liberal professors to get the Oz certificate that says you have a brain and therefore ruling power over the earth. In order for that scam to work guns have to be removed from society so that those types of people can then rule, and justify all the cost they spent to acquire that leverage. The hatred of the gun by such people traces back to their basic problem. The gun is the great equalizer and if all things are equal, those types of people just can’t compete in the world and that is their real fear. That’s why they want guns removed from society, so that their world view can have a chance. But they need the power of government to give them that leverage. They don’t get it from the natural world.

Trump is the right kind of president to have such a speech at just that type of event. Trump isn’t exactly the kind of conservative that was born in Ohio, he’s from liberal New York. Like a lot of people who are successful in life he has learned along the way what works and what doesn’t. Not all thoughts are equal, there are right ways to think and wrong ways, and through his life he has come to the right way of thinking. Because to be successful at life he has had to. There are liberals who have done well. They have managed their businesses conservatively and turn toward socialist action to prevent competition from nipping at their heels, but at some point in their life they had to think correctly about things to become successful. And that is Trump’s story. He wasn’t lucky like I was to get a head start in correct thinking by being born in a place where they had it right all along. President Trump had to get there on his own, which is a common occurrence for most aging people. There aren’t many people like Bernie Sanders out there who arrive at old age as bleeding heart socialists who just never learn the right ways of thinking in life. During the speech Trump announced that he was withdrawing from the UN Arms Trade Treaty which was a pretty big deal symbolically. Doing so assured an artificial value system from a global perspective would not be adopted in the United States, but that a recognition of gun rights would be solidified in legislative thinking which then would be implemented domestically. In short, we would rule ourselves as a country and not revert back to the Vico Cycle of global mess which is plaguing the world currently with all that hinders it.

As a gun owner and advocate I naturally have to spend a lot of time putting up with people who don’t yet get it, and it does wear you out. It’s not nice to rub people’s face in it, I think its good to let free minds be free, which means they need their time to come to the values of conservatism the way that Donald Trump obviously did over the years. Sometimes it takes them many decades to arrive there, but I believe in letting people figure it out on their own. If they want a guiding light, I’m happy to help them. But I’m not willing to yield value for conformity to a system of thinking that clearly is wrong in its foundations. So personally, an evening with President Trump and the NRA is a welcomed treat, a chance to be free of all the slow thinking dysfunction which swallows up so much global potential by following the paths of the past back into the hells of Dante. For one brief day and just a few hours at that, all was right with the world.

Rich Hoffman

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